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Olivier Theatre, the National Theatre


Upper Ground, Lambeth, London SE1 9PX 020 7452 3000

  • Where to buy tickets
  • Best seat advice
  • Seating plan/s
  • Getting to the theatre

Buying tickets online

www.nationaltheatre.org.uk the venue's own website provide the service.
This venue allows individual seat selection for most productions. You can also view the auditorium via photographs taken from various positions within it.

About the show:

Death of England: Delroy

Dick Whittington

 

Booking fees per transaction:
There is no fee for online bookings, except for a £1.50 charge levied per booking to cover postage. Avoid it by booking in person, collecting your tickets on the day, or enclosing your own stamped, self addressed envelope with a postal booking as no fees are charged with those methods. Reader CC notes that the Box Office don't mind this last, though points out that you don't get the smart envelope, nice bit of cardboard and pretty leaflets with tickets, well worth the extra few pence, if you send your own. All cheaper than the £3 fee per booking, not per ticket, fee made for phone bookings - to which the optional £1.50 postage fee also applies.

Other Online Choices (with genuine S.T.A.R ticket agencies): 
Independent S.T.A.R. ticket agencies may also offer an alternative choice of seats for some events.

Ticket agencies offer an alternative way to buy tickets, with booking fees differing from those charged by the theatre box office itself. They may have seats available or special offers when theatres do not.

Ticket agency prices vary in response to theatres implementing “dynamic pricing”  - which alters prices according to demand for a particular performance. Current prices are advised at time of enquiry.

 

Box office information

Telephone: 020 7452 3000
Operated by venue itself.

A £3 fee per booking, not per ticket, fee is charged for phone bookings. An optional £1.50 charge is also levied per booking to cover postage. This is more expensive than booking online, where only the optional £1.50 postage charge applies. 

For personal callers or by post:
Olivier Theatre, Royal National Theatre, South Bank, SE1 9PXX
No booking fee for personal callers.

By post, the optional £1.50 per booking, not per ticket, postage charge applies, unless you are enclosing your own stamped, self addressed envelope. Reader CC notes that the Box Office don't mind this, though points out that you don't get the smart envelope, nice bit of cardboard and pretty leaflets with tickets, well worth the extra few pence, if you send your own.

A reader notes about "Day Seats" in person at the box office:
"I got to the box office about 9:30am and there was already a pretty longish queue outside (they don't let you move inside and start selling until 10, not great if it's raining). The queue took about 45 minutes so I'd suggest you take a book/ipod for the wait. The seats for the evening performance were all taken by then but there were still plenty of standing seats available. I was still able to get a seat for that day as there was a matinee performance with seats spare (Matinees are generally easier to get tickets for)."

Special Access Needs Customers: 
Wheelchair users and other registered disabled theatregoers can book their seats and enquire about concessionary prices that may be available to them on 020 7452 3000.

www.nationaltheatre.org.uk is the official theatre website.

Please remember that cheaper seats often do not offer the same view / location quality as top price ones, and that ticket prices are designed to reflect this difference.

Reader Kevin notes that this is a:
"Fab theatre and excellent seating more or less wherever you sit."

  • Stalls
  • Dress Circle

Stalls

Layout

The Dress Circle does not overhang the stalls in this theatre.

The theatre has a fan shaped auditorium.

There is no proscenium arch; the stage is open and vast.

The centre stalls are a single block bisected by an aisle. This aisle normally separates only rows D to R, but occasionally centre seats are also removed in rows A to C.

Either side of the centre stalls are side blocks in self-contained slightly elevated wings. Side blocks curve to face centre stage. The stage extends to the front of them.

Side block seats are a single block with no aisle at the row ends nearest the centre of the auditorium.

All seats are raised with steps between each row - except A to C, where there is a minimal height difference between rows and no actual step.

Legroom

About adequate for most in all seats, as there are "toe spaces" in front of all rows from D back. Some taller people still find it cramped, though.

Row A normally has unlimited legroom, as does B in the side blocks directly in front of the stage, if the stage is normally configured.

B12 and 33 have nothing in front usually, B13, B32, C13 and C33 have space for one leg at least, depending where the row in front is aligned for a particular performance.

Rows B and C in the centre block have less legroom. Those of 5ft 7 or more could feel uncomfortable.

C7, 8, 38 and 39 have significantly less legroom where they curve towards the row in front. Space to tuck feet under the seat in front, but nowhere for knees to go. Those under 5ft will be most comfortable here, the monkey feels.

Choosing seats in general

Centre Block: 
Rows A to C in the front centre block stalls are narrower than other seats, and do not have armrests. 

The stage is normally low, making A acceptable.

Both rows B and C are O.K., with C slightly better, being a little further back (less neck ache if a two tier set is used) - and it is also the last row in front of the most expensive seats in the theatre, so has a similar view for less cash. Decide if you wish to be close to the stage but a trifle uncomfortable, or comfortable but a long way away in the last row of the circle for the same money...

At top price from row D back, the price reflects the view - with a lot of top price from D to O. Take the seats beside these first. If going top, try for prime seats; pick rows G and H first - an opinion endorsed by a reader.

Next choose rows E, F, L to R in alphabetical order - still a central view but further from the stage. Alternatively, explore circle seats rows A and B seats 33 to 51 - though be aware of the sound problems that occasionally emerge there.

For the rest of rows D to R, all seats in these rows offer at least fair value for money.

Side Blocks: 
At preview performances, try for central block seats as all seats in the side sections are the same price as those in the middle of the auditorium... Centre seats may also even have better sightlines at that time, since these are established and confirmed during that tryout period.

At regular performances, all seats are third price, except for the innermost two or four - those near the wall and drop to the centre stalls – second price.

All seats offer a clear view of the stage. Be aware that there is a wall at the edge of the sections next to the centre block. Some people may find this (and the bar set into it) annoying, most don't though.

In general, Theatremonkey rules that the Dress Circle is better since the viewing angle is more comfortable for the same money. 
The pairs of seats at top price are certainly a final choice once the better seats in both stalls and circle have gone.

Of the third price majority, try row J 5 and 53, K and L 6, and 54 and M 7 and 53 first.

Closeness to the stage compensates for not having a central view. Also consider the Dress Circle row A 11 to 22 and 62 to 73, and B and C 12 to 23 and 61 to 72.

Other second price seats are mostly acceptable, but Theatremonkey rules that the Dress Circle seats mentioned are better since the viewing angle is more comfortable for the same money.

It is worth avoiding seats 1, 2, 58 and 59 in all rows if possible, as they are, comparatively, the worst value. If you must take these numbers, choose row M then L, K and J to provide the best overview of the stage possible.

General hazard notes

Rows A to C are narrower and have no arm rests.

Staging means that you may not get a full view of all the production from all seats. In particular in the centre block stalls, outermost seats from row J back may lose a small part of the stage to the walls of the side blocks. Not a large amount, but worth knowing, the monkey feels.

Side block seats have a wall with rails to the side of the innermost seats.

Innermost side block seats have a long drop beside them, and no aisle. Not for vertigo or claustrophobia sufferers.

Sound can be a problem in the side blocks, particularly for productions that don’t use microphones (more common during “Travelex Season” productions).

Changes for the current production

Death of England: Delroy: To allow for "social distancing" the theatre has been altered to create an "in the round" space. The National Theatre advise that seats at the lowest price may have a restricted view.

Stalls rows A to D have been removed. Two rows of padded benches with no arm-rests now sit in front of row E in the centre block, and row D of the side blocks.

On the stage, two further rows of padded benches face the auditorium. Behind, a grandstand of extra seats - with normal arm-rests - rises to face the auditorium as well. The monkey will add more details when available. At first glance seats here are a range of prices and look to offer decent value. Be aware that there is a longer walk to these seats, and they may not be suitable for those with mobility limitations.

The main auditorium has gaps of two seats between seats sold. Rows D and E look to be lowest price and good value if so. H 5, 6, 54 and 55 are also lowest price and a decent deal.

Otherwise, as usual the monkey likes rows G to L central seats here, but all others do seem very fairly priced.

Wheelchair places at row R seem decent value.

 

Dick Whittington: To allow for "social distancing" the theatre has been altered to create an "in the round" space. The National Theatre advise that seats at the lowest price may have a restricted view.

Stalls rows A to D have been removed. Two rows of padded benches with no arm-rests now sit in front of row E in the centre block, and row D of the side blocks.

On the stage, two further rows of padded benches face the auditorium. Behind, a grandstand of extra seats - with normal arm-rests - rises to face the auditorium as well. The monkey will add more details when available. At first glance seats here are a range of prices and look to offer decent value. Be aware that there is a longer walk to these seats, and they may not be suitable for those with mobility limitations.

The main auditorium has gaps between seats - these vary as extra groups have been created to allow for a family audience. Rows D and E look to be lowest price and good value if so. H 5, 6, 54 and 55 are also lowest price and a decent deal - pairs and singles have rows EE and KK too. For larger groups M 1 to 4 and 56 to 59 at lowest price are well worth a look, as are other second price seats on rows R and M.

Otherwise, as usual the monkey likes rows G to L central seats here, though central J and L are "premium" and expensive. All others do seem very fairly priced.

Wheelchair places at row R seem decent value.

 

Paradise: Central seats in rows E to K are at "premium" prices. Central G and H 17 to 43 are the best view, and 20 to 40 are now "premium," so take the ones around them - just as good.

There's good news on the ends of row J back for those seeking 2 to 4 tickets. Second price bargains. Row P drops to third price, another good deal.

At the sides, from F to K, only two rather than 4 seats are third price - so grab the pairs next to the more expensive ones.

Small Island: Central seats in rows E to K are at "premium" prices. Central G and H 17 to 43 are the best view, and 20 to 40 are now "premium," so take the ones around them - just as good.

There's good news on the ends of row J back for those seeking 2 to 4 tickets. Second price bargains. Row P is the same price if you want to sit further back and more centrally, fair value.

At the sides, the 4 innermost seats in all rows are second price, the ones next to them are third price - the inner ones back to G are not a bad bet if the centre block ones for the same price have gone.

Readers comments

“A30: “Galileo” (June 2006), (Sam – regular reader). For £10 only this seat is always value for money, unless they put a wall in front of you, lol. But, I will try to review it in "absolute terms". The seat is obviously very close to the stage, and you get to see the facial expressions remarkably well. The actors are SO close to you, which is really, really great. The opportunity to see Simon Russell Beale from such close proximity alone is worth more than that £10. You will have however some ache. In my case it was back ache, but it wasn't that horrible. Legroom is also adequate. Not great, but not cramped either (I am about 5' 10.) In balance, I would say front of Dress Circle for the £10 season is better, but I would take this front seat before the very back of the theatre, unless your neck and/or back are very sensitive. And even though I never sat there, but I think the monkey is spot on to make row C green."

"A35: "The Threepenny Opera" (June 2016). End of the row so legroom fine - low seat back and no armrest, but comfortable enough for me. Great to be so close to the action and the set which, as ever at the National, was fabulously minimal and effective. Didn't miss any of the action being on one side. Usual moan though .... air con cranked up way too high and, as there was a vent under the seat, my feet were like blocks of ice. (Memo to self ..... remember to wear Ugg boots in future). Great value for £15."

"B12: "Behind the Beautiful Forevers" (November 2014). Very close to the stage, if you like that kind of thing. At average female height, your eyeline is level with the stage, rather than under it, so you're not craning too much to see faces. But the stage is very brightly lit at times for this play and when it was, I was blinded by a bank of lights placed to the rear left of the stage. (Opposite seat may suffer same issue as there were equivalent lights placed on the right.) Noise level in musical interludes quite loud here also. May be one to avoid if you're sensitive to such things. SPOILER ALERT Watch out for the rubbish shovelling in Act 1 also. (And mind your step at the interval, because they apparently don't tidy up until after the show!) SPOILER ENDS."

"B16: "Frankenstein" (February 2011), (Mark). Perfect view! Have booked the same area for when I see the other pairing."

"B25: Great view on a student's £5 entry pass ticket. VERY uncomfortable. I was squirming in my seat, and the play seemed to drag because all I could think about was my comfort. The only reason I will be sitting here again is because even at £10 (which is what my mum paid) it is a steal of a price."

"B27: "FELA!" (December 2010), (Mark). Perfect seat for this show, all the energy was just oozing right at the audience, and being surrounded by the platform made us feel like we were really part of the action."

"C11 and 12: "Frankenstein" (February 2011). £12 each. What a bargain! They are some of the "narrow seats" but thanks to Theatremonkey advice we got row C. We are of average height and build I guess, and didn't find them uncomfortable at all - and it runs for 2 hours without an interval. There isn't a huge amount of room left to right in the seat, but legroom is considerably better than some upper circles I've sat in! We thought Frankenstein was great seen from up close - there are moments when a character is low on stage and you have heads in the way, but otherwise we felt right in the action."

"C 27: "Translations" (October 2019). Almost dead centre. Low stage, perfect view." 

"D1: "Platform performance." This is extreme end of row, but the rows in front are well below row D, so the view is totally uninterrupted. However, it is very much a side-on view. Legroom is very good and one can stretch onto the aisle for additional room if needed!"

"E 43 and 44: (HB). They were good value and we could see brilliantly."

"F25 and 26: "Beauty Manifesto + Gargantua (NT Connections - June 2011), (Clive). Comfortable seats with an excellent view (as always with the rake in the Olivier), this feels very close to the action."

"F40: As ever the seat was perfect, very comfortable and I felt very much part of the action."

"G 7 and 8: "Frankenstein" (January 2011). Good seats, but no left leg room due to a great wodge of cables pooled in front of the seat, right leg was fine, but 2 hours is a long show with no break and a folded up left leg!"

"H41and 42: “Major Barbara”, (Bas). The seats were good value, the view was excellent. I can't complain."

“Row J (side stalls): "The Comedy of Errors" (December 2011). Given my advanced age (over 50, but not far over), I no longer see quite as well in the dark as I used to, and this new 'fashion' of delivering lines with your back to the stage, can make things very awkward. My vision is not that poor, I do not need to wear glasses, but I did struggle a bit in the subdued lighting."

"J6: "She Stoops To Conquer" (January 2012). I paid £15 for my ticket through the Get Into London Theatre promotion. I'm 6ft tall and felt I had very good room in J6. The stagnation of seats between row I and row J was good and the rake excellent. Even though my seat was to the side of the stage, given that the stage itself is rounded, I had a clear and unobstructed view of the entire performance and missed nothing. Having also sat a couple rows back in this section too, I'm pretty sure that the entire block gives a very good view. Overall, an excellent seat and I'd happily sit here again."

"J17: I managed to get the seat as a student standby for £10 about 45 minutes before the performance. I thought the seat was perfect, a good distance to be able to see all the facial expressions whilst still being able to see the production as a whole.”

"J28: "Follies" (September 2017). My fourth viewing of Follies. That is an absolutely tremendous seat (for whatever is on in the Olivier) - perfectly central and just the right height above the stage, to see everything clearly and take in the vast scale of a big show like that."

"J51 and J52: “Every Good Boy Deserves Favour” (January 2009), (James – regular reader). Tickets were only £15 as it was a preview and at this price they were very favour – especially as the performance is only 65 minutes. The view is good from here, particularly as the performance makes use of the revolve which often makes the performers closer to the sides of the theatre." 

"K43: had to keep twisting and turning to get a little relief from the pain I was feeling in my sitting-down region."

"L35 and L36: (James – regular reader). Excellent rake ensured a great view."

"L5 and 6: "The Comedy of Errors" (December 2011). I paid £25 for my ticket through the 2012 'Get Into London Theatre' promotion. I'm 6ft tall and felt I had pretty decent leg room in L6 (though the person next to me in L5 and about 6' 4" tall was struggling). The stagnation of seats between row L and row K was good and the rake excellent. Even though my seat was to the side of the stage, given that the stage itself is rounded, I had a clear and unobstructed view of the entire performance and missed nothing. Overall, an excellent seat and I'd happily sit here again."

“M12: (Barfly). I love the rake! Nice and steep, so it doesn't really matter if you get a tall guy in front of you - I only had to move because his head was in the way once. Also, because of the way the theatre's angled, there was nobody sitting directly behind me. If I moved it didn't obscure anyone else, hurrah!"

"M27. View is very clear (I think no matter where you sit in the National you will have very clear view). And you are close to the stage. Legroom is very good. Very good seat.”

“M37 and 38: “She Stoops to Conquer,” (Chris B). These seats are towards the back of the stalls on the left hand side (as you look at the stage) but due to the good sized rake you get a good, clear view of the entire stage. You are plenty close enough to see facial expressions and gestures of the actors. The legroom is ample and can’t really fault these seats at all.”

"M58 and 59: "Antigone" (July 2012), (Chris B). These seats are over to the very far left as you look at the stage although as the stage is fairly wide you do get a clear view of the majority, with only the very far left slightly restricted. They are at the back in a raised up section of the stalls, a sort of half-way house between the traditional stalls and the circle. There's plenty of legroom and the seats ate comfortable with the added bonus of M59 being an aisle seat. Would recommend these seats as a cheaper alternative to paying for top price tickets."

"O21 and 22: “War Horse” (December 2008), (James – regular reader). An excellent rake and an expansive stage ensured a fantastic view."

"P47and 48: "Frankenstein" (February 2011), (Clive). Right at the back of the stalls immediately in front of the sound desk, but no noise from there at all. Good seats with plenty of leg room and an excellent view of the whole stage."

Dress Circle

Layout

Called the Circle in this theatre.

Theatremonkey became addicted to the Royal National Theatre in seat B4 so say hi to the hairy guy when he is in residence.

There is only one circle in this auditorium, so nothing overhangs it. 

Seating is split into a centre and two side blocks by aisles. A quirk of architecture means the circle has more seats than the stalls below.

All seats are raked on steps, increasing noticeably from row D back.

Legroom

Adequate in all seats for all but the tallest.

Choosing seats in general

Centre Block: 
For previews, all seats in the centre block, plus all seats in rows A to D of the side blocks are the same top price. Choose the usual seat numbers in centre block rows A to E first , then side blocks A to D as close to centre as possible (considering aisle bars, of course).

At regular performances, row A is top price, so the best fair value is found in the next priced rows B to D. Choose your row in alphabetical order.

Next, take the rest of rows B and C in the side blocks, before resorting to centre block rows F and G centre.

Central rows F, and G in particular, are poor value at third price - considering the distance from the stage. Save many bananas by picking innermost side block circle row G (roughly similar views for less cash) instead; or comparably priced front stalls if you don't object to a lack of armrests.

Side Blocks: 
The National Theatre have realised just how good those seats just over the aisle from the centre block really are... 

Row A seats 19 to 24 and 60 to 65; B and C 20 to 25 and 59 to 64 and D 21 to 26 and 58 to 63 are second price. Still seats the monkey likes, and would happily pay for (the two near the aisle safety rails less so, but otherwise, fine). 

At third price take C 12 to 21 and 63 to 72, D 12 to 22 and 61 to 71, before centre block E then settling for the rest of side block row D. 

Make sure, if taking rows A to D, that you try for the seats as near the second price ones as possible, to maximise your value for money.

Ignore fourth price seats in the side block. They are not especially poor value, but row G seats 17 to 25 and 59 to 70, sold at bottom price, offer a similar view for less cash.

At bottom price be prepared for the Roman amphitheatre cone effect particularly noticeable in row G seats 1 to 10 and 73 to 83. 

Before paying bottom price for much of the back of the Dress Circle, consider stalls row C too. They are closer to the stage for the same money, but less comfortable and potentially neck ache inducing. A choice worth pondering if you want a close-up of the performers though, feels the monkey.

General hazard notes

Safety posts at the ends of all rows irritate but don’t affect views much. The monkey doesn’t see the point of them, though, as they got through three decades without...

Sound can be a problem in all blocks, particularly for productions that don’t use microphones (more common during “Travelex Season” productions).

The rake is very steep from row D back, and from the ends of rows F and G the feeling is of being at the back of a Roman theatre. You are looking into rather than onto the stage as the curved shape feels like you are peering down a cone. 

The side blocks particularly suffer the Roman amphitheatre cone effect - noticeable in row G seats 1 to 10 and 73 to 83 especially. The rake is very steep from row D back, and from the ends of rows F and G the feeling is of being at the back of a Roman theatre. You are looking into rather than onto the stage as the curved shape feels like you are peering down a cone. 

The side blocks particularly suffer the Roman amphitheatre cone effect - noticeable in row G seats 1 to 10 and 73 to 83 especially. A few people find that this descending angle to the stage triggers vertigo in row G, even though it isn’t high.

Changes for the current production

Death of England: Delroy: To allow for "social distancing" the theatre has been altered to create an "in the round" space. The National Theatre advise that seats at the lowest price may have a restricted view.

There are gaps of two seats between seats sold. Central row A at top price is OK, but the monkey would go for cheaper side block row A, central row C then side block row C - or even cheaper central then side block row E first.

Other seats are lowest price, and the monkey would take them if it can't get anything further forward in the stalls or can't manage access to the extra seating down there.

 

Dick Whittington: To allow for "social distancing" the theatre has been altered to create an "in the round" space. The National Theatre advise that seats at the lowest price may have a restricted view.

There are gaps of two seats between seats sold. Central row A at top price is OK, the middle "premium" price seats very expensive, though. The monkey would go for cheaper side block row A, central row C then side block row C - or even cheaper central then side block row E first.

Other seats are lowest price, and the monkey would take them if it can't get anything further forward in the stalls or can't manage access to the extra seating down there.

 

Paradise: In the centre block, row A is second price, B drops to third, C and D to bottom price. The monkey would take the bottom price seats 4 (even 6) off the aisle in the side blocks first from A to D.

If paying more, it would take C 30 to 54 first, then maybe pay a lot more for A 31 to 53 just to have no heads in the way. Then flip between B 31 to 54 or cheaper for almost the same view D 30 to 55.

Small Island: In the centre block, rows A and B are second price, C and D drops to fourth, E back to bottom price. The monkey would take the centre block fourth price in C and D, then the 4 (even 6) six off the aisle in the side blocks first in C and D.

If paying more, it would take A 20 to 17 / 64 to 67 then B 21 to 18 / 63 to 67 at third price, then central A at second price if it must.

Frankly, anything in the £15 section up to 8 off the aisle in row E is an excellent choice too.

Readers comments

“Front Row: "Collaborators" (April 2012), (Taljaard).I paid £12 for a great seat on the front row of the circle."

"A9: "Les Blancs" (April 2016). Overjoyed to have a circle front row seat for just £15. Great view ... Stage rotates .... Didn't miss any of the action and actually, sitting on the right hand side, you got a good view of the four women who provide the musical / choral accompaniment to the action."

A 42 and 43: “13,” (Chris B). Centrally located in the circle, these seats offer a good, clear view of the entire stage, and it is a very wide stage. The circle, however, does feel quite a way back from the stage and I would recommend the stalls as you seem to get more of the atmosphere there. But I can’t really fault these seats, with good legroom and an unobstructed view.”

"C19: (Mark). Very good as far as the circle seats go and definitely worth it for the £10 season."

"C19 and 20: "London Road" (July 2012). Comfortable with very good legroom. At £12 they are an absolute bargain. Green at £12, but probably green at three times that price too. I’ve paid £60 in other London theatres for seats inferior to these."

"C51 and 52: "Follies" (May 2019). There was a clear view of the stage, but due to the size of the theatre, it can feel a bit distant at times and you can not always make out the expressions on the actors' faces. The theatre is well raked and there is no problem with leg room. The seats cost £44.00 each on a senior concession, which is about £20 a seat less than the standard price. Despite the distance I would highly recommend the circle at this theatre. Just a tip, although it is a big theatre the toilet facilities are poor."

"C54: "Everyman" (June 2015), (Taljaard). Excellent seat."

"C77: (Mark). Very good seat, no complaints."

“D10: View is very clear. No complaints whatsoever. However, it felt just little bit far. Legroom is very good. For £10 only, a bargain”

"D18: "Follies" (September 2017). For this show I felt too disconnected from the action, and would definitely recommend trying to sit closer."

“D18 and 19: “The Comedy of Errors,” (Chris B). These seats are fantastic; you are so close to the stage you almost feel part of it. They are raised enough over the seats in front to clearly see the whole stage. They are centrally located and there is sufficient legroom. I would recommend these seats.”

"D20: Very good clear view of the stage. In a longer show, seats are comfortable and spacey enough not to get too distracted."

“D26 : "Hamlet" (October 2010), (Mark). Great value at Travelex prices, very good view of the whole stage and plenty legroom!"

"D62: "Hadestown" (November 2018), (Taljaard). Great seat for this show."

"E15 and16: (Alun). Seating: was OK except you feel very high up and the stage looks like you are hovering above it."

"E40: "Amadeus" (January 2018), (Josepha). A long way back. However wonderful central view. The only aspect that I disliked were bright headlights used at back of stage at certain parts of the play - they are dazzling and detract from ones enjoyment." 

"E45 to 48: “Danton’s Death”, (Clive). (As before) the view was good with a pronounced rake, comfortable seats and good legroom."

"E46 to 51: 'Welcome To Thebes' (July 2010), (Clive). (Also previously E47 to 50 for 'Women Beware Women' in the same season). Have sat in these seats or nearby on several occasions and the view has always been good. The rake is pronounced and the seats are comfortable with good legroom. Excellent value for £10 as always."

"E50: "Macbeth" (March 2018), (Taljaard). Boy, those seats need a bit of TLC. But as part of the Travelex season it was only £15 so a bit of a bargain."

"E 55: "Follies" (September 2017). It was my first trip to this theatre and I did not know what to expect. Although high up it was an excellent seat. It was on an aisle and the leg room was room. I am 51 11" and despite the length of the performance I was very comfortable. Only nuisance is getting up to let others in, but you expect this on an aisle seat. The view of the stage was great as the seats are well raked. The sound quality was also very good. I would certainly sit in this seat again and at £41 it is much cheaper than many others in the theatre."

"F24: "She Stoops To Conquer" (January 2012), (Taljaard). The Olivier is just too big, so much is lost on the vast stage. What you need, as the story unfolds, is a sense of claustrophobia and to be able to see the actors facial expressions. This was quite difficult from F24."

"F47: "Translations" (October 2019), (Taljaard). Great view but they really need to re-pad those seats. Two and a half hour running time and it's quite uncomfortable."

"G1: "Wonder.Land" (December 2015). First seat in back row of circle .... you couldn't get further away from the stage if you tried!! Good legroom ... like being on the end of a row anyway, but once again at the National, I was FREEEEEZING! Do they crank the aircon up I wonder?? View of the floor of the stage OK, but the back of the stage was obscured by lighting rigs / scenery etc. Wouldn't normally bother me, but couldn't see anything of the screen at the back of the stage. As the whole concept of the play was an online/virtual world that was played out on the screen, it did matter for once. Enjoyed the play though, and couldn't really complain for £15."

"G66: (Mark). Definitely worth considering for the normal shows, but would definitely go for something closer in the £10 Travelex season."

"G68: (Hannah M). I booked last minute and it was one of the few seats available. I generally don’t like sitting in the circle but for £10 the seat was excellent. The rake is really steep, meaning you can see perfectly over everyone. Even from this distance, I still felt very caught up in the action and didn’t miss a thing. Definitely worth going with these seats if only £27.50 ones are left in the stalls."

"G69: "Follies" (December 2017). Extremely lucky with this, released back online just two hours before the performance - leading to a very quick bus ride to Waterloo! Absolute bargain at £15, could see the stage clearly and follow all the action."

"G81: "Danton's Death" (November 2010), (Mark). Clear view if a little bit of an odd angle, good value for normal productions but when so many Travelex seats are cheaper being further forward would be better."

Notes best seat advice

Total 1160 seats.

Air-conditioned auditorium.

Audio described and signed performances regularly. Headset system available. Smart Caption Glasses available for some productions. Guide dog sitter available. All printed information available in large print, on tape and in Braille. Minicom at the box office. Access to Olivier is level from the lift. Free car parking in centre car park for orange badge holders (get endorsement stamp at information desk). Lifts from car parks to all levels. Adapted toilets (unisex, sadly) throughout theatre. Fuller details from www.nationaltheatre.org.uk, the theatre on 020 7452 3000 (Minicom 020 7452 3009).

Food buffet restaurant at stalls level, coffee shop and formal restaurant in complex. Ice cream and confectionery from vendors just outside auditorium.

Bars at Stalls and Circle level. 

Toilets in Stalls and Circle, two gents and two ladies. Unisex disabled toilet at stalls level.

General price band information

Theatres use "dynamic pricing." Seat prices change according to demand for a particular performance. Prices below were compiled as booking originally opened. Current prices are advised at time of enquiry.

Based on paying FULL PRICE (no discount!) for tickets, site writers and contributing guests have ALSO created the colour-coded plans for "value for money," considering factors like views, comfort and value-for-money compared with other same-priced seats available.

For a full discussion, opinions, reviews, notes, tips, hints and advice on all the seats in this theatre, click on "BEST SEAT ADVICE" (on the left of your screen).

On the plans below:
Seats in GREEN many feel may offer either noticeable value, or something to compensate for a problem; for example, being a well-priced restricted view ticket. Any seats coloured LIGHT GREEN are sold at "premium" prices because the show producer thinks they are the best. The monkey says "you are only getting what you pay for" but uses this colour to highlight the ones it feels best at the price, and help everybody else find equally good seats nearby at lower prices.

Seats in WHITE, many feel, provided about what they pay for. Generally unremarkable.

Seats in RED are coloured to draw attention. Not necessarily to be avoided - maybe nothing specific is wrong with them, other than opinions that there are better seats at the same price. Other times there may be something to consider before buying – perhaps overpricing, obstructed views, less comfort etc.

Please remember that cheaper seats often do not offer the same view / location quality as top price ones, and that ticket prices are designed to reflect this difference.

CLICK SEATING PLAN TO ENLARGE IF REQUIRED. USE "BACK" BUTTON TO RETURN.

By value for money:

Death of England: Delroy
SOME DETAILS WILL CHANGE AS THE PRODUCTION BEGINS PREVIEWS. THE MONKEY WILL UPDATE AS AVAILABLE.

Olivier Theatre Death of England: Delroy value seating plan

 

Dick Whittington
SOME DETAILS WILL CHANGE AS THE PRODUCTION BEGINS PREVIEWS. THE MONKEY WILL UPDATE AS AVAILABLE.

Olivier Theatre Dick Whittington value seating plan

 

Paradise

Olivier Theatre Small Island value seating plan

 

Small Island

Olivier Small Island Value seating plan

By price:

Death of England: Delroy
SOME DETAILS WILL CHANGE AS THE PRODUCTION BEGINS PREVIEWS. THE MONKEY WILL UPDATE AS AVAILABLE.

Olivier Theatre Death of England: Delroy prices seating plan

 

Dick Whittington
SOME DETAILS WILL CHANGE AS THE PRODUCTION BEGINS PREVIEWS. THE MONKEY WILL UPDATE AS AVAILABLE.

Olivier Theatre Dick Whittington prices seating plan

Paradise

Olivier Theatre Paradise prices seating plan

 

Small Island

Olivier Small Island Value seating plan

 

Notes

Filmed performances are also at the preview prices.

The Dress Circle is called the "CIRCLE" in this theatre.

 

Please note: The seating plans are not accurate representations of the auditorium. While we try to ensure they are as close to the actual theatre plan as possible we cannot guarantee they are a true representation. Customers with specific requirements are advised to discuss these with the theatre prior to booking to avoid any confusion.

-0.1145632, 51.5070147

Nearest underground station

Waterloo - Bakerloo Line (brown), Jubilee Line (silver gray), Northern Line (black). Also a main line station.

For mobility impaired audience members, the Society of London Theatre provide a "photo map" - illustrated walking route to this venue from a near landmark and also Waterloo Station (the nearest fully accessible station) on their website www.officiallondontheatre.co.uk, via the theatre's listing page on that site.

This station has multiple exits, not clearly marked, so be careful! The best route is as follows:

Turn left and head for the main exit - a grand archway with steps down to street level.

At street level, turn to your left, and walk towards the main road. Ahead to your left is a huge silver steel rectangle. No, the monkey does not know what it is either. To the left of it, and behind, is a pedestrian passageway called "Sutton Walk"; which goes under a bridge. Take it.

At the end is a fountain ahead of you. You are now on "Concert Road Approach". Turn to your left. The Royal Festival Hall is ahead of you. Walk towards it. 

Facing it (note the cafe in front of you) - stand on this paved area (Belvedere Road) and turn to your right. A roadway and bridge are ahead of you. Cross the roadway, walk under the bridge. 

On the other side of the bridge, the Royal National Theatre is ahead of you to the left. Also to your left is a roadway. Walk along it to the end.

Either use the revolving side door just before it to enter the coffee shop foyer, going straight on into the Lyttelton Foyer down some steps. OR, if this door is closed:

Turn right at the corner of the red building. Keep it to your right and go straight on.

There is a round sculpture to your left too.

The main theatre complex entrance is in the centre of the building, to your left.

The Olivier Theatre is at the third level inside the building to the left.
___________

If you have the misfortune to leave the station by the "Waterloo Road" exit, fear not. You can either walk through Waterloo mainline station and leave by the York Road exit, or take this route - CONSIDER YOUR PERSONAL SAFETY.

On leaving the glass doors, turn left. Walk to the corner, and turn left into "Mepham Street". Walk all the way to the end of it, avoiding the temptation to go under any bridges.

At the end of the street is York Road. Cross it. Ahead of you, to the left, is "Sutton Walk", the pedestrian road under the bridge. Take it.

At the end is a fountain ahead of you. You are now on "Concert Road Approach". Turn to your left. The Royal Festival Hall is ahead of you. Walk towards it. 

Facing it (note the cafe in front of you) - stand on this paved area (Belvedere Road) and turn to your right. A roadway and bridge are ahead of you. Cross the roadway, walk under the bridge. 

On the other side of the bridge, the Royal National Theatre is ahead of you to the left. Also to your left is a roadway. Walk along it to the end.

Either use the revolving side door just before it to enter the coffee shop foyer, going straight on into the Lyttelton Foyer down some steps. OR, if this door is closed:

Turn right at the corner of the red building. Keep it to your right and go straight on.

There is a round sculpture to your left too.

The main theatre complex entrance is in the centre of the building, to your left.

The Olivier Theatre is at the third level inside the building to the left.

___________

Another visitor suggest this route: Take the tube to the Embankment station and walk across the Hungerford  footbridge to the south bank, then walk past Festival Hall complex and under Waterloo Bridge.

The Royal National Theatre is ahead of you to the right. 

Noted are the " Gorgeous views both up and down river on a good day or evening.". The monkey endorses this comment, especially at twilight!

Buses

1, 4, 68, X68, 168, 171, 176, 188, 501, 502, 513 to Waterloo Bridge.
Get off on the Bridge and look for the large advertising board on the roof of the National Theatre, facing the Thames. Take the stairs on this side of the bridge down to the ground. A safe crossing of the bridge can be made by taking the stairs down to first level and walking under it on a walkway linking the staircases either side of the bridge.

On the correct side staircase, leave it, turn to your right. The entrance is in the centre of the building, beyond the round sculpture ahead of you. The Olivier Theatre is at fourth level inside the building.

Car park

Under the theatre. Take the elevators in the centre of the car park to the correct level. Theatremonkey advises parking near the exit ramps for a fast getaway after the show, and strongly recommends you note the compass point, colour band and number of the nearest pillar you park by. Banquo's ghost has nothing on the haunted souls who wander the underground space, wailing for their transport each night. Some have been there since the place opened in the 1970's.

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