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Charing Cross Theatre


The Arches, Villiers Street, London , London WC2N 6NL 08444 930 650 

  • Where to buy tickets
  • Best seat advice
  • Seating plan/s
  • Getting to the theatre

Buying tickets online

www.charingcrosstheatre.co.uk
Sales are handled by the venue.
 

Booking fees per ticket:
A fee of £3 per ticket applies, plus 50p restoration fee.


 

Other Online Choices (with genuine S.T.A.R ticket agencies): 
Ticket agencies offer an alternative way to buy tickets, with booking fees differing from those charged by the theatre box office itself. They may have seats available or special offers when theatres do not.

Ticket agency prices vary in response to theatres implementing “dynamic pricing”  - which alters prices according to demand for a particular performance. Prices stated here were compiled as booking originally opened, current prices are advised at time of enquiry.

.Other Independent S.T.A.R. ticket agencies may also offer an alternative choice of seats.

TheatreMonkey Ticketshop

 

 

 

 

Box office information

Telephone: 08444 930 650 
Answered by the theatre.

Booking fees per ticket for telephone bookings:
A fee of £3 per ticket applies, plus 50p restoration fee.

For personal callers or by post:
The Arches, Villiers Street, London. WC2N 6NG
No booking fee for personal callers, except the 50p per ticket restoration fee. This box office is open from 2 hours before performances - roughly 5.30pm usually, on performance days only.

Special Access Needs Customers: 
Wheelchair users and other registered disabled theatregoers can book their seats and enquire about concessionary prices that may be available to them on a dedicated phone line during office hours  on 020 7930 5868. Please DO NOT use this telephone number for any other purpose.

www.charingcrosstheatre.co.uk is the official theatre website.

Please remember that cheaper seats often do not offer the same view / location quality as top price ones, and that ticket prices are designed to reflect this difference.

  • Stalls
  • Stalls Benches
  • Stalls Alcove
  • Side Balconies

Stalls

Layout

This consists of a front and rear block of seats, the division being a wide aisle in front of row K.
From row D back, the seats are raked (arranged to help see over rows in front) by means of steps (as in a Circle) rather than a sloped floor.

Rows L to N seem to have a slightly shallower tiering than row P back. 

Seating is a warm "plum" colour that should hide the stains, thinks the monkey!

Legroom

Pretty generous to all but the tallest over 6ft or so, in all rows except the front one. The tallest should pick K or D1 and 12, as they have nothing in front. D 2 and 11 are 70% clear in front, too.

Rows from L back have an inch or two less, but are still comfortable.

Choosing seats in general

If all seats are sold at a single price, monkey advice is rows G to K first, then F, E, D, then A or L back, in that order.

Otherwise, it would normally take F, E, G then D, in that order, seats 3 to 10 being most central.

Moving back in this block, rows H to J seats 3 to 10 offer good views too, being about a third of the way back and just adequately raked to look slightly down on the stage. Before buying in the rear of the front block, though, it might just be worth considering the row behind...

...the front row of the rear block of seats. Row K, as the theatre have named it, is on a wide aisle and looks over the block in front and down onto the stage at comfortable height. The combination of nobody in front, a lower price and extra legroom makes the monkey feel this is the row it would choose. Several readers prefer J, though, as the angle to the stage is felt to be slightly better. The long gap in front of K can be cancelled out by a tall person in J blocking the view, it's been noted.

Moving further back, rows R and S seem a little further from the stage, so when all seats in the section are the same price, try for further forward.

General hazard notes

Row A looks directly up at the low stage. A few may find it a bit of a neck ache, but compared to other theatres, there is little problem, and inventive pricing can often make them pretty good value, in monkey opinion.

The front block of seats consists of rows A to J. Rows A to C are on a flat, one reader felt back-sloping, floor. Though staggered to allow viewing between the seats in front, the shorter visitor - especially children - would probably be advised to avoid rows B and C completely, just to guard against having anyone tall in front of them.

When row A is removed and the stage forms a curve in front of row B, row B 4, 5 and 6 have no legroom, 3 and 7 have less than other seats in that row too, for those over 5ft 5 or so; and all may be blocked by stage lights in front. A sharp look up to the stage is also guaranteed - not great for top price seats, feels the monkey.

In the rear section, the side balconies (well, the lights on the front of them) slightly project out, intruding on the edges of the stage. Only purists will notice that one, though.

Row W (seat 7 in particular) has complaints that a ventilation fan blows on it throughout the performance.

Row X has two extra problems worth noting. A sound desk is normally directly behind the central seats, and behind that is a bar serving drinks and refreshments. This means double noise from technicians both audio and alcohol service proficient. Not an atmosphere the monkey feels it would enjoy watching a show in. At a low price, though, the monkey feels it fair value.

Changes for the current production

Details are for the previous scheduled production. This will be updated if required.

Row A is the front row. Usually, the central seats have a little less legroom - the monkey will update as available. On the plus side, it's bottom price for this, so a bargain.

Top price goes back to row N. The monkey would  take P over N, or go for row R - cheaper still for the same view once row A has gone. Views from R are better, it feels, than from same price balcony seats.

Rows behind row S are not on sale for this production.

 

 

Readers comments

"Row B: "Lost Boy" (January 2014). The stage has been built out in such a way that if you are seated in row B you are sat staring directly at the wall that supports the stage itself– even if you are above average height. Front row seats (for this show B is the front row) always come with a bit of requirement to look up. However, on this occasion the reward for a cricked neck is an uninterrupted view of the footlights and not much else. At this proximity in terms of blocking your view, the footlights are equivalent to sitting behind a pillar. Thankfully, a quick word with a friendly usher meant that we (and everyone else in Row B) were moved to empty seats elsewhere in the theatre – so the upshot is I can’t say how restricted the view would have been, but it would have been substantial. Moral always be nice to ushers. 
Row B is on your warning list for this theatre – but based on my experience then for some productions it needs to be a severe warning. For me, in future if these were the only seats available I would question how badly I wanted to go.

As for the theatre, well I think that it is very bad of them to a) to be offering these seats for sale at all b) to charge the same price as elsewhere in the auditorium, and b) not give any restricted view guidance on their web site."

"D1 and 2: "Lost Boy" (January 2014). Third row from the stage for ‘Lost Boy’. We got these because of your seating plan, btw - they tried to give us row C but I asked to move a little further back, and D1 and 2 was the result! These were the right-aisle (as you face the stage) seats, which the box office told us were excellent. Lots of legroom (more on that in a moment) and close to the stage (the edge of the stage is at eye level, which is not an issue), but with good clearance over the two rows in front. Because D1 is beyond the last seat in row C, this is an excellent seat for someone of smaller stature as it ensures a clear view of the stage. 

All seats have good legroom: row K especially so as it is the centre lane/aisle leading to the main exit, but if sitting there I would suggest row L as it gives slightly better clearance of row J at the front of the centre lane/aisle. All seats give a good view of the stage (with the possible exception of the front two rows as they are below the level of the stage so you lose a little at the very front with row C giving the worst views as there is a backward rake that tilts it below row B) as the rake is gradual but gives more than head clearance for each row. Only drawback is occasional train noise overhead, but not enough to cause annoyance. The theatre also has it’s own restaurant, serving up a small, but very good quality pre-show menu."

"D 11 and 12: "Titanic" (June 2016). Sat in D11 and 12 of this rather small theatre which were perfect if, like myself, you get a bit claustrophobic (but like to be at the front) as D12 is end of a 12 seat row with nothing in front of it. Great view from all seats due to one step rake at each row. Would probably avoid A to C as with the high but quite compact stage you tend to get the backs of actors or objects blocking your view of what's happening behind. Seat comfort, couldn't complain."

"D12: "Ragtime" (November 2016). It was on the end of a row with nothing in front of it and I found the seat itself very comfortable for what was quite a long performance (2 hours 45 minutes, with one interval). Row D is the first tiered row and the view is perfect – you are just high enough to see all the footwork on the stage. I like being at the front, but rows B and C (no row A for this production) were possibly a little too close to the stage and are all flat on one level, meaning you need to crane your neck to see the stage and may have people in front of you blocking your view if you are in row B.

This is a long, thin theatre and I think if you sat at the back you would feel quite distant from the stage. By contrast, book a seat on the one of the benches on either side of the stage (tucked away and accessed via a small, steep staircase) and you might find yourself rather closer to the action than you'd envisaged!"

"E3 and 4: "Mythic" (October 2018). I am 6ft tall and had very good leg room and a very comfortable seat too (I wish all theatres seats were this!). I could easily see over the heads of the people in front as our row was one step up. My friend is 5'5'' tall and she had to lean a little bit back in her seat to avoid a neck ache from looking up at the stage but she too agree the seats were really good."

"E10: "Harold & Maude" (February 2018). Very happy with it. This gave an excellent view of the stage with just a tiny bit hidden on the edge of the set. This may not even be noticeable in other productions. The seating in the stalls is arranged in steps, like the New London Theatre, and I had no difficulty seeing over the heads of folk in front. Legroom was good and the seat comfortable. I don't think I would have liked to have sat too far back in this theatre though, as the rear rows did appear to be quite remote from the stage."

"F10 to 12: "Titanic The Musical" (July 2016). These were premium seats - only bought as they were the only seats left - but they did give an excellent view and the addition of a drink and programme was a nice touch, worth the £39 paid."

"G3: "The Mikado" (December 2014). Great seat but legroom might be an issue for tall folk. Squeezing past people in this theatre to get to a seat further along the row is a nightmare! On the plus side, the venue feels very intimate."

"G5: "Oh Come All Ye Divas" (December 2016). Not one, but two, side spotlights reflected from the highly polished side of the grand piano and sent beams of blindingly bright light straight into my good eye, to the extent that I spent most of the show with one hand in front of my face shielding the light. Apart from that, G5 was perfect."

"M6: "Yank" (August 2017). Lovely seat, with a nice clear view. Able to take in all the stage."

"P4: "The Woman in White" (December 2017). This seat was good, there’s good rake and you are a good distance to be able to see everything clearly whilst still being able to see facial expressions."

"S1: "The Woman in White" (December 2017). An aisle seat, which was nearer the stage than the seat I moved from. On the other side of the theatre, so easier to leave at the interval and end of the show."

"W12: "The Woman in White" (December 2017). The seat has a good clear view of the stage and although it is only a small theatre you feel a distance from the stage. However, the leg room is good, but I would advise an aisle seat on the other side of the theatre, as it is easier to get out in the interval and at the end."

Stalls Benches

Layout

Either side of the front stalls, two raised alcoves containing benches.

There is only one row in each bench area.

Legroom

Seat 1 is fine - nothing in front. Every other seat is tight, even for a midget - if 5ft or less you could sit here just about... but won't be able to see over the wall in front.

Choosing seats in general

If sold, they are often a cheap option for the tiny. At second price or above, there are better seats available.

The seat furthest from the stage has the best viewing angle, the one closest has legroom but misses the near eighth of the stage and quarter of the rear stage.

General hazard notes

None.

Changes for the current production

Not on sale.

Readers comments

None.

Stalls Alcove

Layout

On the side furthest from the entrance door, and at the end of the "cross aisle," this is a niche in the wall, under a staircase, with a low wall in front of it.

Legroom

Normal chairs, so no problem.

Choosing seats in general

If sold, go for seat 1, furthest from the stage and nearest the aisle.

General hazard notes

About half the stage is missed from here.

A bit of a strange place to sit, cut off from the auditorium yet part of it. Odd. Not somewhere the monkey recommends.

Changes for the current production

Not on sale.

Readers comments

None.

Side Balconies

Layout

Above the stalls, along the longest side walls run narrow balconies. These overhang the stalls aisles, and so do not interfere with the view from the seats beneath.

Seats are arranged in single file, one behind the other, and are not raked.

Legroom

Good in all seats.

Choosing seats in general

Around a fifth of the nearest side of the stage is not visible from these seats. Factor in the problem of those in front of you leaning outwards to see more, and anyone seated here may have a hard time enjoying the show...as well as needing an appointment with a physiotherapist at some point!

If you must, then take the seats nearest to the stage first - but be aware you won't be able to lean out without attracting moans from others seated behind you. On the other hand, if you take the seat furtherst away, you will have to lean a long way over to see that missing fifth of stage.

Wheelchair users are seated in Balcony 1. The monkey isn't sure how a user would see very well from this position, though - a plinth or cushion may well help here.

General hazard notes

A low bar runs across the front - the view is not affected in the least by it... but to see anything, you lean outwards over the edge - makes a change from leaning forwards, felt the monkey. If somebody ahead of you is leaning too far, you see less.

Seats are not raked to see over those ahead.

Changes for the current production

Details are for the previous scheduled production. This will be updated if required.

Six seats in balcony 1 are on sale, in addition to the wheelchair and companion spaces. At the same price as stalls rows P and Q, the monkey would probably take cheaper row A first, then cheaper rows R and S or P and Q if paying more. No leaning needed there, and less irritating as a result, it feels.

Readers comments

"There was one lady sat on the balcony. She kept having to lean over a lot. I think the balcony will be hard work for shows using this layout."

"Seats 1 to 4: overlook the stage."

Notes best seat advice

Total 276 seats.

Air conditioned.

Wheelchair access is flat from the foyer to the viewing position in Balcony 1. The entrance door is wide, and the disabled toilet is close by on the same level. The only problem is that part of the street outside is cobbled, making pushing harder. Steep stairs down to the auditorium may make access for transferees difficult. Guide dogs are welcome. During office hours, theatre administration staff can assist with disabled bookings ONLY on 020 7930 5868. Please DO NOT use this telephone number for any other purpose.

No food except bar snacks in the auditorium, but a full restaurant is available adjacent, open until 2.30am with live music on many nights.

In 2019 a reader says, "Speaking of the bar, the one at this theatre must deserve a special mention? It's more like a pub than a theatre bar, massive and with actual beer on taps, not just in bottles."

Two bars, Rear stalls (opening into the auditorium) and foyer.

3 Toilets in all. 1 ladies, 1 Gents, 1 unisex disabled.

General price band information

Theatres use "dynamic pricing." Seat prices change according to demand for a particular performance. Prices below were compiled as booking originally opened. Current prices are advised at time of enquiry.

Based on paying FULL PRICE (no discount!) for tickets, site writers and contributing guests have ALSO created the colour-coded plans for "value for money," considering factors like views, comfort and value-for-money compared with other same-priced seats available.

For a full discussion, opinions, reviews, notes, tips, hints and advice on all the seats in this theatre, click on "BEST SEAT ADVICE" (on the left of your screen).

On the plans below:
Seats in GREEN many feel may offer either noticeable value, or something to compensate for a problem; for example, being a well-priced restricted view ticket. Any seats coloured LIGHT GREEN are sold at "premium" prices because the show producer thinks they are the best. The monkey says "you are only getting what you pay for" but uses this colour to highlight the ones it feels best at the price, and help everybody else find equally good seats nearby at lower prices.

Seats in WHITE, many feel, provided about what they pay for. Generally unremarkable.

Seats in RED are coloured to draw attention. Not necessarily to be avoided - maybe nothing specific is wrong with them, other than opinions that there are better seats at the same price. Other times there may be something to consider before buying – perhaps overpricing, obstructed views, less comfort etc.

Please remember that cheaper seats often do not offer the same view / location quality as top price ones, and that ticket prices are designed to reflect this difference.

Seating plans below are for the previous production. This will be updated when a new production is announced.

By value for money:

Charing Cross Theatre value seating plan

By price:

Charing Cross Theatre prices seating plan
Notes

Please note: The seating plans are not accurate representations of the auditorium. While we try to ensure they are as close to the actual theatre plan as possible we cannot guarantee they are a true representation. Customers with specific requirements are advised to discuss these with the theatre prior to booking to avoid any confusion.

-0.1263096, 51.5080298

Nearest underground station

Charing Cross - Bakerloo (brown) and Northern (black) lines or Embankment - Bakerloo (brown), Northern (black), Circle (yellow) and District (green) lines. Also Main rail network terminus.

Charing Cross: Leave the station by following signs from the platforms to the STRAND street exits. Walk straight ahead into the underground shopping arcade and keep going straight on into the light. If, underground, you pass Davenports Magic shop, turn around and walk the other way.

Take the right-hand staircase up to street level. At the top of it, you should see a semi-pedestrianised street sloping downwards to Embankment underground station. If you see instead a very busy road, the Strand, with Brook Street Employment Agency to your right, turn around and face downhill instead - you took the left instead of the right hand side stairs.

Walk downhill a very short distance, looking up and to your left for a silver, semi circular sign with "The Arches Shopping Centre" on it. 

This juts out over the street and marks the entrance to the tunnel where the theatre hides. At street level, a small sign to the right of the tunnel entrance confirms that you have the correct place.

Below the silver sign is a wide, brownish, sloping path into an area of small shops and restaurants - all snugly tucked into this railway arch beneath the station bridge above.

Walk almost to the end of the shops, and the theatre entrance is to your left.
________________________

Embankment: Leave the barriers and turn left, exiting to look up a semi-pedestrianised street sloping downwards to the underground station. If you see instead the river, go back and use the other station exit.

Walk uphill a short distance, looking up and to your left for a silver, semi circular sign with "The Arches Shopping Centre" on it. The theatre is inside - as per directions above.

 

Buses

3, 11, 12, 15, 24, 29, 53, 77, 77A, 88, 159, 170, 172  stop nearby.

A reader notes that the 15 route compliments it's modern buses with a small number of Routemasters (or, to the non-Londoner, the ones they've all seen in pictures with the open bit on the back). Sadly these days the conductor will run a scanner over your Oyster rather than punch your ticket. Getting off at the station I rang the bell to stop the bus by pulling the wire than runs along one side... and got off grinning like a fool in the middle of a nostalgia trip!"

Taxi

A rank for Black taxis is at Charing Cross Station - a short distance from the theatre up hill via Villiers Street. Best chance of hailing one in the street is to walk down the tunnel to Northumberland Avenue and / or on to the Embankment.

Car park

Spring Gardens. On leaving the car park walk into Trafalgar Square. The first major road you come to is Whitehall. Cross it, and head on round, crossing Northumberland Avenue and continuing past Waterstones bookshop. Bearing to your right, enter a busy street called the Strand.
To your right will be Charing Cross Railway Station. Don't be tempted to enter it, just stay outside the railings and walk past it (mind the taxis as they enter and leave). 

Keep going to the far side of the station. At the corner of it, to your right, is Villiers Street. The Brook Street Employment Agency ahead of you on the corner will confirm it - don't walk any further than this blue fronted landmark!

Villiers Street  is semi-pedestrianised and slopes downwards to Embankment underground station. Turn right into it, and walk around the stairs set into the centre of the street - they lead to the underground station, and nowhere else. 

Walk downhill a very short distance, looking up and to your left for a silver, semi circular sign with "The Arches Shopping Centre" on it. This juts out over the street and marks the entrance to the tunnel where the theatre hides. At street level, a small sign to the right of the tunnel entrance confirms that you have the correct place.

Below the silver sign is a wide, brownish, sloping path into an area of small shops and restaurants - all snugly tucked into this railway arch beneath the station bridge above.

Walk almost to the end of the shops, and the theatre entrance is to your left.

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