Theatremonkey®.com

          
  

Cookies: to find out more or learn how to changing your settings, click here. We are pleased to accept your consent to our policy if you are happy to continue without doing so.   

London Theatre & Music Venues' Expert Seat Reviewer and Discount Deal Hunter.
The Trusted Independent Insider Listings Guide since 2000.

SEE ALL DISCOUNT LONDON THEATRE TICKET SPECIAL OFFERS
Home Page
Buy the Site Book
SEARCH THE SITE
By Venue Name
By Show Title
For Best Seat Info
For Seating Plans
For Show Time Schedule
For Day Seat Information
CHECK OUT THE
Latest Special Offers
Tips, Hints & Features
Top Five Charts
GUEST SERVICES
Theatremonkey Ticketshop
Hotel plus Show Deals
Venue Access Guide
Theatre Dictionary
FAQ's
Contact Us
Blog and Book Extracts
Take The Site Tour
Join Our Mailing List
Links To Other Sites
CD and Gift Shop

Tourist Attraction Ticket Shop



 

 

 

 


Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

QUEEN'S THEATRE
SHAFTESBURY AVENUE, LONDON


 

 
 
 

 

LES MISÉRABLES (musical)


In nineteenth century France a convict goes straight, a single mother goes on the game, students go rioting, a publican goes thieving and a policeman goes bonkers. All as a direct result of being spun on a turntable for three hours every night.

On 5th January 2010, the show celebrated it's 10,000th performance in London, and on 8th October 2006 became the longest currently running musical in the world. A refreshed version of the score was introduced in June 2011.

 

Photographic credits for above: (Queen's Theatre production)
Left:
Paris. Centre: Lovely Ladies. Right: Barricade.
Photographer and Copyright Owner: Michael Le Poer Trench.
Please note that these photographs are used by permission. They MUST NOT be reproduced on other websites without permission of the above mentioned copyright owners.

 


Les Misérables 25th Anniversary Concert at the O2 Coverage:


 

Theatremonkey Opinion:

From the Palace Theatre production:
This you either love or hate. Opera buffs of this monkey's acquaintance complain the blend of theatrical / opera / pop that comprises the music is tinny and pretentious. Others find the interwoven storylines too much work for an evening out, and the completely sung score a tad relentless.

For the millions of Les Miz fans worldwide (including theatremonkey); this remains a story of immense hope and humanity and we leave the theatre happily deluded into thinking we have discovered just that bit more about people, including ourselves. 

The current London production was cut by fifteen minutes in March 2001. Viewers will not notice since the cuts were the bits 'restored' a year ago - those same bits originally cut from the very first production! Frankly, the monkey is just glad not to be on the score copying team.

Theatremonkey advises first timers read the programme notes before the performance starts, and be prepared to concentrate - this show does not come easy. Hugo fans should know that the original novel has been filleted to produced a focused three hours, and characters and connected relationships do not appear as written.  No worries though, the novel survives the adaptation very well to this non literary monkey's mind.

 

Your Reviews: Add your own by clicking here.
Important: Some reviews below can contain "spoilers" - please don't read if this bothers you!

Older reviews from both this and the Palace production are posted on another page please click here. Reader laments on the passing of the show from the "Palace" era can be read here.

(The last reviews from the Queen's Theatre production are below)
__________________________________________________________________

I saw 'Les Misérables' twice in mid-May 2012. I am quite a fan of the show, and try to see it regularly, so my opinions are perhaps not objective because I know I love the show. On the other hand, I can be critical because I have seen the show a number of times. I returned in mid-May to see the current cast before the cast change on June 18th. As many people have noted, the current cast is one of the strongest I've seen in years. I specifically wanted to see the outstanding Hadley Fraser again as Javert, before he leaves in June. He brings a fresh take to Javert: perhaps more intellectual and conflicted than other portrayals I've seen. And Hadley's voice is fantastic! If you can go before Hadley leaves in June, do - it will be well worth it.

The whole cast was very strong. Two performances of special note are Craig Mather as Marius (best Marius I've seen in several years: nice combination of voice, acting, and the requisite good looks) and Adam Linstead with a dual role of Grantaire and the Bishop. I continue to be impressed with the way Adam makes Grantaire stand out during the barricade scenes - it's hard to take your eyes off him. He has a unique voice that I really enjoy, as well. I believe both Craig and Adam are remaining in the cast after the change in June 2012, so that's good!

Regarding seats: for one performance I sat in E14. This was an excellent seat: 20 GBP less expensive than the row directly behind it, because E is bordering on too close to the stage. (The stage at the Queen is quite high.) However, for the 20 pound savings, it was well worth it. You don't miss much at all, and being that close to the stage has the major benefit of putting one very close to the action---it's very easy to see every facial expression. I would sit there again. For my second performance, I sat in H19. This seat was, again, 20 GBP less expensive than the seat directly next to it (seat H18), because it is not as "centre". Row H does give a slightly better view than row E, because it's back just a bit further, and one doesn't lose much in terms of seeing expressions and being close to the action. Legroom was fine in both seats, and both were comfortable.

Alison.
_____________________________________________

'Les Misérables' is one of the most Amazing shows I have ever seen. From the music to the staging, from the scenery to the lighting every aspect of it is simply stunning. It was my first time seeing it in January of this year (2012), and I was mesmerised by it, with Ramin Karimloo as Jean Valjean (sorry about my spelling not quite sure how to spell the French names) who has an extraordinary voice and is a captivating performer, as was Shaun Dalton who played Javert - Hadley's understudy.

A lot of you have been saying how Alexia Khadime did not suite Eponine, well I completely disagree! She was phenomenal! For me Alexia stole the show, she was so brilliant in the way she sang - especially in "On My Own." I don't think any of you can fault her vocals, her interpretation of the character was completely spot on, she was quite literally outstanding and I think anyone is very lucky to see her perform as she really is that great!

I sat in the stalls about 5 rows from the front, and had no problem at all with my view - even though I was near the end of it to the left hand side.

Congrats to all the cast of Les Mis 2011-2012 all of them were so very talented. I wish them all the very best for the future, and I wish the new cast the very best of luck.
_____________________________________________

Just a quick email to thank you for the unrivalled quality of information on your website. This was the first time I had visited Queens Theatre, having seen 'Les Mis' at the Palace several times in the early nineties.

The excellent information on your site helped me to find the best compromise between seat price and view of the stage and I will have no hesitation in recommending Theatre Monkey to any potential theatre goers!

Queens Theatre is a lot more ‘cosy’ than the Palace. We found the seats (G5 and G6 in the Dress Circle) were comfortable enough. These were the best available during “Kids week” and meant that, with one seat costing £65, my daughter’s seat was free. The aircon was not great – warm and humid in London that evening and got almost uncomfortably warm in the Dress Circle (my daughter was annoyed at the many people in the audience using their programmes as fans). Thanks to other contributors comments about the ladies toilet facilities, my daughter sprinted up as soon as the interval came – so avoiding the 20+ minute queue that didn’t clear until well after the 2nd act had started.

To save repeating many of the comments already published on Theatre Monkey, I can summarise a comparison between the 1992 Palace version and the 2012 Queens version…..for me, the 2012 version has lost some of the fluid and harmonic singing of the 1992 version but pays more attention to the acting. A prime example of this was when Thenardier’s gang was preparing to break into Valjean’s house. The crescendo build-up of 1992 was replaced with a keener sense of the skulduggery that was taking place (and shorter lyrics leading up to Eponine’s scream). I have to say I preferred the 1992 version.

Without the detailed analysis of the seating options contained on the website I doubt I would have found seats that were as well placed.

13th August 2012.
_____________________________________________

I have always found Theatremonkey so useful and I wanted to provide a review of my experience for 'Les Misérables' at The Queens Theatre on 28/8/12.

I was sitting in Row H of the Stalls in seats 2, 3 and 4 which the Monkey suggests are red. Normally I agree with the Monkey, but not this time. The seats offered a superb view of the whole stage and being just around half way back still allowed us to see the actors close up and the sound was great. It was pleasing to know that I had paid an average of £33 per seat (Kids Week) and just along the row there were top price seats at £85 each and I don't believe they would have had any better experience.

One final tip, I had an 11 year old with me and emailed the theatre management in advance to reserve a booster cushion. Glad I did as they were all gone when we arrived but a staff member was waiting for me at the top of the stairs with cushion in hand - top marks for great customer service!

Max G
_____________________________________________

Recently had a very good evening in stalls seats E5 and E6. Seats were roomy enough for me at over 6' though there wasn't much I could do about the tall fellow who arrived in the nick of time and sat right in front of me (why does that always happen to me?!) We had a full view of the stage front to back and side to side and of course at that range you really feel part of the action. That sort of experience does come at a price....

Thanks for all Theatre Monkey advice - I'm a regular reader and occasional reviewer!

DOK=
_____________________________________________

We had a super time. Booked the VIP package with stalls seats G13 and 14. We were escorted to our table in the bar area
where we sat and enjoyed a few glasses of champagne before the show. The lady who looked after us was great and very  attentive. We were allowed to take a plastic glass into the show with us and the rest we left to finish off during the interval. We felt quite grand walking into the theatre with our champagne.

The seats in the Stalls Row G were great - what a lovely view. I have to say it’s the best view I have had in this theatre. They are definitely worth the money especially for anyone who has never seen Les Mis before.

I am so pleased I booked these for my guest as she thoroughly enjoyed the show and the whole VIP experience.

We managed to finish our champagne during the 15 minute interval as well. Although the package was expensive it was well worth it. I can certainly recommend it for a special occasion.
______________________________________________

A friend and I wanted to see 'Les Mis' on a Saturday evening. We're both unpaid interns in London, and don't have a lot of money to spare. I'd seen the show twice in London already, only had good things to say about it, and wanted to take her along for her first viewing. Standing room tickets are only sold once the house has sold out (which it has pretty much every night in the wake of the film). We were able to buy them around 3pm for the 7:30pm show, although I imagine it might be smart to turn up a little earlier. Tickets are only £10 on weekdays and £12.50 on weekends.

We were standing in the Upper Circle behind row L. There's a comfortable wall in front of you to lean against and put your drinks on, although I had to wonder how the people in row L felt about that. I was constantly worried I was going to knock my drink onto them. And I know that I wouldn't want a bunch of people (10 people are allowed in the standing area) hovering over the back of my seat the entire time. But they didn't seem to notice or care.

We used binoculars. They were too close at times (really only beneficial when one person is on stage or when you want to pay attention to a specific part on stage). Otherwise, you miss the rest of the staging. Still - it was nice to have a chance to get a closer look when we wanted to.

I think the Upper Circle is a perfectly fine view. I've been seated in the back of the stalls before with the dress circle overhang, and while those are good seats, you miss a bit at the top of the barricade. From the upper circle, you do miss a little during "Paris/Look Down" when Eponine, Marius, and Enjolras are using the bridge at the very top but they don't spend a lot of time up there. You can see Enjolras flip over the bar on the barricade and climb down in order to arrange himself for his death scene. As someone who has seen the show it didn't bother me, but for first timers it could take them out of the moment a little (my friend noticed and found it fascinating, so it really depends). Either way, just be assured that most of the time the actors climb down from from the top to come into view for all of the audience. Nothing too vital happens up there. Although, I was a bit annoyed when I sat in the back of stalls and couldn't see the tail end of The Final Battle. I could really only see Enjolras' legs and a bit of the flag. That's such an iconic part of the show, and we were all leaning forward to see it. However, from the standing room in the upper circle, it was no problem at all (almost too good of a view considering we could see how he flips over!)

We're in our twenties so we were fine standing for that long - might be a little harder for older audience members. The nice thing about the standing room is that there's no way you can distract anyone else in the audience, so you're free to stretch a little, roll your shoulders, (quietly!) walk around a bit. The privacy is nice, just make sure you're not disturbing the other standees.

I will say it was ridiculously hot up there, but I think that's pretty normal. The only complaint I have (and this doesn't at all impact the actual show) is that it's really difficult to see the actors take their bows during the curtain call. In the likely event there's a standing ovation, you really can't see a thing. But, if you go around to the stage door and meet the lovely cast, that certainly makes up for it.

Another perk to standing - easy and quick access to the toilets. As soon as One Day More finished, I applauded, and then quickly headed to the bathroom for intermission. You don't have to worry about getting out of your seat and navigating through the aisles, so I was the first one there. Easy way to beat the never-ending queue!

Anyway, I'm rambling. Standing seats are outstanding for the price. Definitely worth it if you're low on money or just cheap (like me). And chances are you'll love the show enough to buy great seats in the future, because this show is truly a treat. I always recommend it to people who don't know what they want to see during their visits to London.
______________________________________________

I wanted to add to the info you have for The Queens Theatre. I went on Friday 16th August 2013 and paid £24.50 for a group booking and I was in seat A3. I would not choose to sit in this seat again as my view was obscured by the heads of the people in row AA. As soon as the lights went down the whole of row AA leaned forward to lean on the barrier in front of them which from my seat succeeded in obscuring anything that was happening at the front of the stage. I spent a lot of time admiring the large chandelier!

Theatre etiquette in the "cheap seats" was also pretty poor with no intervention from theatre staff to stop the talking and the checking of smart phones which regularly illuminated people's faces. Due to the curve and being seated on the edge of the row I was very aware of this out of the corner of my eye and it proved very distracting.

I last saw "Les Mis" at the Palace in 1992 and was blown away by it (rear of stalls) and was saddened that I did not feel the same this time. The sound quality was not as good and up in the gods sounded a bit thin. I didn't feel emotionally connected to the production, and I think this largely was because I struggled to see the action on stage for 70% of the show.

In a nut-shell: avoid A3 in the upper circle, especially if it's your first time seeing "Les Mis."
______________________________________________

I went to see 'Les Misérables' last Tuesday evening (October 2013). I booked upper circle J1 and J2 on your recommendation and wanted to say thank you.

The tickets were very reasonable, £21.50 each. The seats were handy for the ladies, not too far from the exit and the upper bar was quiet at the interval.

The view of the stage was very good and the only bit we missed was the very front right of the stage and if there were people on the barricades we missed their heads, but that didn't happen often.

Thanks for the great advice

Amanda Johnston,
Cheam.
_______________________________________________

February 2014: Tickets were well worth the money! Excellent show and excellent seats thanks to the monkey :) x
_______________________________________________

Visited 27th February 2014.

Seats: Loge 1 £45 each seat.

Bought 2 seats for this at theatre box office at 7.10 pm, chosen in favour of stalls side seats at £67. This is another show I have visited multiple times going right back to the original cast at the Barbican (what a hell hole to get to that is), let alone the original cast from the Palace. I like the Queens Theatre I think I prefer it to the Palace, but I have to admit I prefer the old orchestrations from the Palace version.

The seats here are excellent, and a steal at £45. Given the choice I would go for Loge 2 on the other side of the house but what you actually miss from here is minimal compared to the reduced pricing. Legroom was fine as you can position the chair either side facing or front facing. You can lean to your hearts content without disturbing anyone, but I never needed to and I'm only 5ft6. It is extremely handy for getting out at interval being right by the exit door and beating all the rushes to get out and back in again. Good to know if, like me and my friend, you're part of the people or are banished to the pavement for a nicotine fix.

I don't think I will ever hear anyone sing Marius like Michael Ball did all those years ago, but what I did witness was the best Valjean I have ever heard in Daniel Koek, and probably the next best Eponine to Frances Ruffelle I have ever seen in Carrie Hope Fletcher. I also got to see my first ever technical fault in a theatre as the show ground to a complete halt just has Valjean took young Cosette away. The house lights came up the curtain and safety came down and we were sat waiting for around 10 minutes for the show to restart.

Les Misérables never fails to impress when it comes to those big stirring songs like 'Master of the House' and 'Do you hear the people sing.' and this cast are no exception, but I cannot remember when the last time I heard or saw a reaction to 'One day more 'and the end of act 1 than I did on this visit.

I would urge anyone contemplating Les Misérables to go and see this cast while you can, and then you will realise why you will never be able to recreate this on film no matter how hard you try or with whoever you cast. The experience of hearing it live and feeling the emotion of the music and singing for real can never be beaten and this current cast are pretty near perfect. I will definitely be back before the next cast changes.

Mark Lane.
Willenhall
 


 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Performance Schedule:
The monkey advises checking performance times on your tickets and that performances are happening as scheduled, before travelling.

Monday to Saturday at 7.30pm
Wednesday and Saturday at 2.30pm and 7.30pm.

 

Runs 3 hours approximately. (Jean Valjean of course runs for many years more, but that is beside the point).


 

Ticket Prices:

Offers May be available - Click Here

View this information in diagram form

Stalls
Rows A to R £67.50 except
Stalls row E 7 to 20; F 5 to 23; G 5 to 22; H 4 to 23; J 5 to 22; K 5 to 22: £95 (extra seats are also added at some performances, the venue will advise of further changes at time of enquiry)

Restricted view (circle overhang rows S to W / conductor in view in row A) Stalls
Rows S to U, plus row A seats 13 and 14: £45
Rows V and W: £35

Dress Circle
Rows A to K £67.50 except:
Row A 11 to 26, B 6 to 21, C 5 to 20, D 7 to 22, E 8 to 22: £95

Restricted view Dress Circle
Dress Circle slightly restricted row L, plus A 8 and 28, B 3 and 24 and C 1, 2, 24 and 25: £45
Dress Circle restricted view slips A 2 to 5, 31 to 34: £35
Dress Circle restricted view slips A 6, 7, 29, 30; plus Loges 1 and 2: £45
Dress Circle A 0, 1, 35 and 36 restricted view and legroom slips: £22.50

Upper Circle
Row AA 8 to 11 and 17 to 20; A and B 8 to 22; C 7 to 23; D and E 5 to 20; F 6 to 19: £45
Row G 6 to 21; H 5 to 20; J 3 to 18: £35
Rows K and L: £22.50

Restricted view Upper Circle
Row AA 6, 7, 12 to 16, 21, 22; B and C 6, 7, 23, 24; C 5, 6, 24, 25; D and E 3, 4, 21, 22; F 4, 5, 20, 21: £35
Row AA 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27; A 3, 4, 5, 25, 26, 27; B 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29; C 1, 2, 3, 4, 26, 27, 28, 29; D and E 1, 2, 23, 24; F 1, 2, 3, 22, 23, 24, 25; G 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26; H 1, 2, 3, 4, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25; J 1, 2, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23: £22.50
Row A 1, 2, 28, 29: £12.50

Once all seats are sold, standing room is available for £12.50 per ticket to personal callers at the box office only.

 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Buying Tickets Online:

Other Box Office Information

Tickets offered differ between outlets. Outlets also may offer different seats via their phone and online systems. Offers may be available click here.
Theatre Box Office:
www.delfontmackintosh.co.uk provide their own service for this theatre.
This system allows you to select your own seat numbers.
 

Booking fees per ticket for online bookings:
£2.25 per ticket - 25p less than by phone. This covers the cost of flags, thinks the monkey.

Other Online Choices (with S.T.A.R. genuine ticket agencies):

www.seetickets.com / telephone 0870 830 0200 (FREE call if using BT.com Calling Plan at your chosen times) which charges  £6.75 on £67.50 (£4.50 on £45 tickets Monday to Thursday / £11.12 on £67.50, £6.75 on £45 tickets Friday and Saturday) per ticket booking fee, plus £2.75 per booking, not per ticket, service charge.


When the theatre does not have the tickets you desire available, it is well worth trying the Theatremonkey Ticketshop agency, telephone 020 7420 9778 (0044 207 420 9778 if calling from outside the United Kingdom), which offers seats with a £10.25 booking fee on £67.50 (£14.25 on £95, £3.50 on £22.50) seats - moderate by agency standards, though higher than box office fees, worth trying as they often have an alternative choice of seats available! Note that this system will confirm exact seat numbers prior to purchase. A £1.95 per booking, not per ticket, handling fee may apply on some transactions by telephone. NO handling fee applies for online purchases.

www.ticketmaster.co.uk offers another alternative, here, the booking fee is £7.40 on £67.50 (£10.45 on £95, £3.85 on £45, £2.50 on £35) seats until 25th October 2014 / £7.75 on £67.50 (£10.90 on £95, £5.20 on £45, £4 on £35) seats all performances from 27th October 2014 onwards. An extra £2.85 per booking (not per ticket) to cover postage is also charged. This system allows you to choose your own seats from the selection the company has available.

Encore Tickets (telephone 0207 400 1253 / 0044 207 400 1253 if calling from outside the United Kingdom) offer £67.50 seats with an £18.50 booking fee per ticket (£25 on £95, £12 on £45, £10 on £35, £6.50 on £22.50 seats). A postage charge of £2.25 per booking, not per ticket may be applied to bookings made from UK addresses more than 5 days before the performance. The "Flexiticket" Exchange Service, allowing FREE transfer / cancellation (credit note up to 12 months) of your booking up to 3 days before the performance is also available for £2.50 per ticket. Discounts and "Meal and Show" packages may also be available. Quality and Value hotel / theatre ticket packages are also available.

Lastminute.com offer £67.50 seats with a £7.50 booking fee per ticket (£10 on £95, £5 on £45 and £35, £3.50 on £22.50 seats) at all performances until 25th October 2014 / £67.50 seats with an £8 booking fee per ticket (£11 on £95, £4.20 on £35, £3 on £22.50 seats) Monday to Thursday / £67.50 seats with a £10 booking fee per ticket (£14 on £95, £6.75 on £45, £5.50 on £35, £3.50 on £22.50 seats) Friday and Saturday at all performances from 27th October 2014 onwards. NOTE: Seat numbers are NOT available in advance from this company. All seats booked in the same price group will, of course, be together or at the very least be in front or behind each other in the theatre. In the very unlikely event of this not being possible this company will call you and give you the option of cancelling your booking. However if booking in two or more price bands, you will not be sat together. Please DO NOT purchase if this is unacceptable to you, as all tickets are sold subject to this condition. Discounts and "Meal and Show" packages may also be available. Quality and Value hotel / theatre ticket packages are also available.

Londontheatredirect.com offer £67.50 seats with a £12 (£15 on £95 seats) per ticket booking fee. Collecting tickets from the box office before your performance is free, OR, if required and time allows, there is a postage charge option of of £2.95 (£4.95 to non-UK addresses) per booking, not per ticket applies to all bookings. Optional Ticket Insurance is also available. Discounts and Meal and Show Packages may also be available.

ALSO SEE Tickettree.com for great value "hotel and theatre ticket" packages.

Other Independent S.T.A.R. ticket agencies may also offer an alternative choice of seats.


 

Box Office Information:
Tickets offered differ between outlets. Outlets also may offer different seats via their phone and online systems. Offers may be available click here.
Theatre Box Office:
Telephone: 0844 482 5160
(020 7812 7498 if you cannot use the 0844 number)
Operated by Delfont-Mackintosh Theatres. At busy times / outside working hours - 9am to 8pm, See Tickets may answer on behalf of the venue.

Booking fees per ticket for telephone bookings:
£2.50 per ticket - 25p more than online. This covers the cost of flags, thinks the monkey.

For personal callers or by post: Shaftesbury Avenue, London. W1V 8BA
No booking fee for personal callers. Postal bookings attract the same £1.50 per ticket fee as telephone / online sales.
 

Special Access Needs Customers:
Wheelchair users and other registered disabled theatregoers can book their seats on 0844 482 5137 and enquire about concessionary prices that may be available to them. The wheelchair users line connects directly to the Delfont-Mackintosh Theatre Group Helpline in London. See Notes.

www.delfontmackintosh.co.uk is the official theatre website.

www.lesmis.com is the official show website.

 

 
 
Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Theatre Seat Opinions:
Please remember that cheaper seats often do not offer the same view / location quality as top price ones, and that ticket prices are designed to reflect this difference.

A "view from your seat" facility exists at: www.lesmis.com.
 

Seating Plan Diagram

Stalls Dress Circle Upper Circle Notes
STALLS 
Layout:
The Dress Circle overhangs the stalls at row G. The top of the stage is not visible past row M.

Dress Circle slips also overhang the ends of rows from around G back.

Seats are arranged in a single block.

The rake (sloped floor to help see over rows in front) is good and most noticeable from row H back.

The audience enter through the back of the stalls, behind row W.
 

Legroom:
Adequate for all but the very tallest in all seats.

Row A seats 5 and 6 have less legroom than the rest of the row.
 

Choosing Seats in General:
Row A seats 13 and 14 are slightly cheaper as the conductor can sometimes be seen. Purists might want to avoid the seats behind these - B14 and 15 - to be on the safe side, though it does not bother the monkey and it does not feel you would have a problem!

Row A seats 5, 6 are cramped, the rest look up at the fairly high stage from a reasonable angle. Only the extreme ends of the row may find looking sideways a little bit of a strain if in a lazy frame of mind. The same goes for the first and last three seats in rows B to J.

That aside, the overhang of the circle above may be registered by those in the single outermost seats from row H back. Not critical enough to ruin anyone's enjoyment, though.

Otherwise, at top price most central seats in rows back to N are pretty satisfactory. Rows D to G are prime.

Rows P and Q the monkey judges only just fair at top price as they are also further from the stage than many may like. If you are seated here, try for the centre of the rows - seats 11 to 16. The circle curves inwards and the overhang is minimised. Row R it just feels is pushing it too far for the cash.

On the plus side, whilst quite far back, when the entire stage (both horizontally and vertically) is used, it means you can take in the full effect of the scenery even if the actors seen a little way off. So, something to think about before buying - hence the "red" colour on the seating plan...if you are paying a lot for your ticket, the monkey feels you should think about things first before opting for these rows...it hopes it can help you make an informed choice!

Seats this far back are NOT for purists or a romantic evening, though - more for fans happy with hearing and seeing most of the show for the umpteenth time...

Rows S to W are a little cheaper, if you can accept the limitations, second time visitors might appreciate the change.

Rows V and W have about a fifth of the top of the stage not visible. The ends of the rows suffer particularly. The monkey isn't keen, and a sound desk installed here makes picking seats tricky. Still, so long as you avoid W15 in particular (desk takes a good fifth off your view), and V16 and 19 just for noise (there's a tiny gap between them and the desk) you are doing pretty well. Row W is slightly higher too, which helps.

Sit in the rear stalls if the Upper Circle legroom does not appeal, though the Upper Circle is likely to edge it on view alone. The restriction of losing the stage top is allowed for in pricing.

General Hazard Notes:
At the front of the stage, microphones are hidden behind raised cobbles - this does not noticeably affect the view, though purists may wish to sit a few rows back from them. Those wishing to observe lighting effects on the stage may also want to sit further back or in the Circles.

Row A 13 and 14 may have the conductor in view. This is also noticeable from seats behind in rows back to E.

Circle overhang both at the back and sides of the auditorium.

Sound desk at the back of the auditorium.

Changes for the current production:
Seats around rows E to K 9 to 18 (more at certain performances) are sold at premium prices. The view is fine here, whether you wish to spend the extra is totally your choice, feels the monkey... who doesn't like the fact most prime stalls are "premium" price on Saturdays.

The projections on the floor of the stage are most clearly visible from around row M back.

Rows from S back are discounted in proportion to the amount of barricade action missed.
 

Reader Comments:
“Row A: (Louise Robinson). I was to the left of the gap where the Conductor is. Although you did have to look upwards a bit, having sat all around the theatre the front row was astounding. The only bad thing I could say about it was the amount of spit Javert sprayed all around the stage as he sung - it was at times a little off-putting."

"A6 (of changed layout without Row BB): This in front of the tooter section from the orchestra. Of course they are really loud but not annoying. You are totally in the action of the show. But you have to turn your head right and left and right and left. When they are climbing on the barricades you have to lift up your head to see the flag waving! Look for those seats if you are a fan of the show. They will give you a wonderful evening."

"A10 and 11: Managed to get these through GILT for half price so a bargain. It’s a great view at the front, so close to the action. If you are shorter, the conductor may slightly get in your way at times if you sit in the middle of row A but otherwise fine. So if you can get hold of tickets for a discount then there is no reason to be put off by being in Row A. All the seats in the stalls are the new straight backed ones, which are not as comfortable as the traditional curved back styles.

"A15: I was very happy about with this seat! The conductor is not ruining your experience. There are some microphones covered as cobbles in front of the stage but they won't harm you! You will have lots of space to put down all the merchandise goodies you might have bought before the show and you will have lots of space for your legs. You're really close to the action and sometimes the actors spittle will graze your face:-) Of course, a seat in row E or F will give you a better overview, but in row A you are thrilled by the actors work! The sound is very good, and not to loud (but that's my personal perception, for the lady next to me it was a little bit too much - but hey glad for her that she doesn't have to see 'We Will Rock You,' for example)."

“Row B: (Stuart Spendlow). The view was fantastic and you really felt like you were in there with all the action. (row B is worth the money)."

"Row B: (Fiona). I could see all the facial expressions and felt I was really a part of the action!"

"B15 and 16: Offered a wonderful view. I was worried that we would be too close and would end up with sore necks, but no. These seats were wonderful; we saw all the facial expressions clearly and saw all the action clearly."

"C4 and 5: (Jessica and Niamh). Got these at a large discount: Although they were end of row we still felt like we were in the action and took in the full impact of what was going on on stage and the power of the music. If it is your first time, make sure you get great seats - front stalls are the way to go, no closer than C though as the stage is high."

“C7: (Sam).”Very clear view, but naturally one would like to be more centre. (Another reader reports well-balanced sound in this row too).”

"C18 and 19: Excellent seats, not too far forward, fantastic view of all the action, and we felt really involved in it all."

"Seat D13: first time I have been so near to the stage, and to be honest wouldn't have wanted to be any further forward. The conductor was like a jack in the box, also he was weaving around like a boxer. It must have been very off putting being in the middle of the rows in front of me, actually I was put off a bit by him, can't imagine what it must have been like for those in the front row. To be fair to him, his moving about shows that no matter how many times he has performed, he is still very much into the music and the occasion, though. Leg room was very good. (And remember, those directly behind the conductor in row A ONLY do get a discount, notes the monkey...).

"D13 and D14: I would recommend these seats, which I got for £40 (using an offer) but would have paid full price for seats of this quality. The seats are central to the stage and as a result you don't miss any of the action. The only thing I didn't like with these seats was that you were stuck in the middle of the row so it was a problem getting out of the row to get to the bar or the toilets in the interval, without having to ask at least half of the row to move out of their seats first. Lots of legroom in these seats!"

"E5 and 6: (DOK=). Seats were roomy enough for me at over 6' though there wasn't much I could do about the tall fellow who arrived in the nick of time and sat right in front of me (why does that always happen to me?!) We had a full view of the stage front to back and side to side and of course at that range you really feel part of the action. That sort of experience does come at a price...."

"E8: At an another evening with the people singing I was seated here. The view was very good, even the sound, and you're close to the stage. There was quite enough legroom and it was a very good investment and a lovely theatre evening!"

"E14: (Alison). This was an excellent seat: 20 GBP less expensive than the row directly behind it, because E is bordering on too close to the stage. (The stage at the Queen’s is quite high.) However, for the £20 savings, it was well worth it. You don't miss much at all, and being that close to the stage has the major benefit of putting one very close to the action---it's very easy to see every facial expression. I would sit there again."

"E19 and 20: (Tamara). Slightly too far forward for my liking, the stage is quite high for this show and the view would have been more comfortable from further back."

"E19 and 20: (James – regular reader). Quite close and a high stage means looking up (and we were lucky not to have anyone tall in front), but it is a fantastic view and you can see every expression and hear every note. Well worth top price."

F11 and 12: My friend was able to get £45 per ticket on the day after being offered a discount by the theatre box office salesperson for premium seats which usually cost £85 (during the 2012 Quiet July patch, notes the monkey - this isn't usual practise). I've seen this show many times and these are by far the best seats I have ever had. Excellent legroom (I'm 6' tall), fantastic and obstructed view of the entire stage (you miss a bit with water being projected on the ground which is mainly seen by people higher up), great sound, and really feel a buzz that isn't present further back."

"F13 and 14: Paid top price, but properly the best seats in the house. Smack bang in the middle and just the right distance from the stage. Beautiful sound, and close enough to see the action properly, without the 'tennis watching' effect. This is what theatre should be like if you're paying top price - not tickets anywhere in the stalls!"

"F15: (Alison). I popped for great seats this time: stalls F15, right in the centre. The seat was comfortable and there was plenty of legroom. At first I thought row F might be a tad too close, but again, I revised my opinion as soon as the show started. Row F turned out to be one of the best seats in the house...the sound was great, and you could clearly see the expressions on the actors' faces. I thought the seat was well worth the price."

"F17, 18 and 23: (Cristopher H). We were very happy about them, although I think we were a bit too close because we couldn't see the river in ''Valjean's Soliloquy.'' I was very impressed about the leg room, and therefore excited because the monkey had given them a green rating; seat 23 was great as well, I don't see why the monkey gave it a red rating. (This is due to the circle overhang, notes the monkey.”

"G3: (James T). Theatre monkey advises against this seat, though as a student I managed to secure it for the bargain price of £20. For what I paid it was an excellent seat. Good leg room and an excellent view of the stage. (As the reader says, the ends of the row are OK. at a heavy discount, but you probably wouldn't want to pay the full top price. Useful for a student to know, of course, though! If these seats were regularly £20, the monkey would, of course, have given them a "green" rating).”

"G11 and 12: “Les Mis”, (James – regular reader and “Miz” fan). This was my first time in the Stalls here and I’m still undecided as to whether I prefer the show from the Stalls or the Dress Circle. I think you feel more involved from the Stalls but not being particularly tall I found row G perhaps a little close and had to look up a bit. However, legroom and sound were both good."

"G13 and 14: Booked a 'VIP Package.' The seats in the Stalls Row G were great - what a lovely view. I have to say it’s the best view I have had in this theatre. They are definitely worth the money especially for anyone who has never seen Les Mis before." I can certainly recommend it for a special occasion."

"G21: Probably the best area to watch it. If you want to forget you're sitting in a theatre, these seats are definitely worth the price."

"H2, 3, and 4: (Max G). The Monkey suggests these are red. Normally I agree with the Monkey, but not this time. The seats offered a superb view of the whole stage and being just around half way back still allowed us to see the actors close up and the sound was great. It was pleasing to know that I had paid an average of £33 per seat (Kids Week) and just along the row there were top price seats at £85 each and I don't believe they would have had any better experience. (The monkey notes it bases ratings on paying "full" price, rather than discounted).”

"H5: One of the best places in the theatre to see the show. A very good overview. The sound is perfect ( thanks to the new sound system). I've seen the barricade boys from many different angles from the stalls, and this is one of my top favourite seats from now. You get every emotion from the very beginning."

"H19: (Alison). This seat was 20 GBP less expensive than the seat directly next to it (seat H18), because it is not as "centre". Row H does give a slightly better view than row E (where I sat on another visit), because it's back just a bit further, and one doesn't lose much in terms of seeing expressions and being close to the action. Legroom was fine in both seats, and both were comfortable."

"H25: good view, but as the monkey's diagram rightly indicates, not one of the best seats for that price."

"J15: Was lucky enough to pick up one of the ‘Premium’ £85 seats half price at the last minute in January 2012. It is a great view from the middle of stalls but is it worth paying the extra £20 for these ‘Premium’ seats I hear you ask? Well if you were paying full price I would say it is not worth paying the extra, most normal seats in the stalls offer a great view and I don’t believe you would really get much different view a few rows further forward or back from the premium rows. If you are paying full price I would just try and get somewhere in the middle stalls either side of the premium rows, if you manage to get a discounted ticket then pretty much anywhere in the stalls is worth it. Leg room is ok but for the 6ft plus like myself I would say it is about average (the straight backed seats affect it), so not the best around but far from the worst and not a massive problem.”

”K10 to K13: (Andy, Claire and family). (Oyster card promotion). Seats were ideal, great view, good leg room... the seats positions come recommended."

"K11 to 13: (Ali). Good view of the stage, couldn't see the whirlpool clearly, but I'm not too bothered about that. The legroom was surprisingly good. On another visit, Ali had stalls K 6 to 9 and commented, "we often seem to get row K - good view of the stage and performers."

"K13: A brilliant seat. Offered a clear view of the action, you can see all the facial expressions of the actors. This seat is comfy and leg room was very good! My one gripe and its a small one is because this is a central seat, the conductor was in my eyeline and he was moving all over the place! Quite distracting! However for the access rate of £20 it was a brilliant show and an excellent seat. At the interval I looked to see what the £15 seats were like and I definitely think for me for this show there is no comparison - pay the extra £5 to get a top price seat!"

"K24 and 25: (Sarah Louise). Marked as red, but in my view (no pun intended!) the seats were excellent!! I have sat in most areas in the stalls and would happily sit in these again! The view was unrestricted if VERY slightly side on (seeing as these seats are the very end of the row not as side on as you would expect due to the small theatre). We had 3 VERY tall girls in front of us and still could see perfectly and there was adequate legroom."

“Row L: Perfect view and plenty of leg room”

"L13: (Cathy). Absolutely perfect view, altho' sound a little muffled / distorted in places because of the overhang from the Royal Circle)."

"L25: Got this seat on a last minute student standby. Cost £27.50. Was a very good seat. I thought at first I might have had some problems because it was the furthest seat to the side but I don't think I missed anything at all. I think if I'd been paying full price (which will never happen :P) I would want to maybe be a bit more central and maybe a little bit closer."

“Row M: (Kyrsty Mewett). We occupied the last two seats of row M in the stalls, and our view was uninhibited - even of the set on each of the boxes. There was plenty of legroom, and, unlike seats closer to the stage, we could also see all the effects on the floor of the stage (such as the 'river' during "Javert's Soliloquy")."

"M7 to 9: (Nadia). I enjoyed being able to see faces and was happy with the seats. I think anywhere in the stalls would be OK as there are not any beams to obstruct your view."

“N17 to 22: (my old favourite, the 'upper circle trick' - and the main reason why I booked Wednesday afternoon tickets worked - got moved from £18 offer seats to these). I thought these seats were really good, I can see from the plan that theatremonkey rates them red, but I disagree and think they should be white at worst. You don't miss anything because of the circle overhang as it lines up with the top of the stage - it certainly does not cut off the top of the set. These seats feel close to the stage but is far enough away to appreciate the whole of the sets. A few rows back I imaging you would miss some stuff on the top of the barricade though. Leg room was fine.".

"P4 to 8: Although the overhang is there, in no way did it detract from the performance. We could see everything on the stage and we were close enough to feel part of the performance. )Another reader mentioned that row P (particularly the sides) suffer badly from the same overhang).”

“P7: (Nicky). I was a bit disappointed. The overhang of the Dress Circle did not detract at all, but unfortunately I had my view pretty severely blocked on the right hand side of the stage by the gentleman in front. He didn't appear to be a giant and by no means was sitting particularly bolt upright, but his head pretty much blocked the bottom right hand quarter of the stage - particularly pertinent in one scene. I'm not particularly short at 5ft 6ins, and so can only conclude that the staggering of the seats is a bit off, as I've never really had this problem in other theatres before. I would certainly choose my seats more carefully next time."

“Row Q: Even though I had a perfect view and adequate leg room, I couldn't help but think how I would've liked to have been closer to the stage. I felt slightly out of the action so to speak. The overhang does block a little of the top half of the set, but nothing to ruin the experience." A fair summary, felt the monkey. You can see the important stuff, but some of the scenic effect is lost. Possibly not for a first-timer or special occasion.”

“Row R: Bought 'best available' tickets off Lastminute.com for £29.50 + £1 booking fee. Legroom was ample, view not the best - the Dress Circle overhang obscured some of the 'higher up' action, and we felt a bit distant from the stage. That said, good value for what we paid, would have been miffed if the tickets had been full price. "

“Row R: Got the middle seats through the TKTS booth for £27.50 + £2.50 booking fee. As others have mentioned, this does suffer from the overhang but there is literally only 10 seconds in the entire production when an actor is obscured. You shouldn't panic when you can't see the '1815' projection which starts the show and is projected so high you can't see it!"

“R15 and 16: Offer a pretty good view with good leg room, although sound not great in places because of the extended circle overhang and no speakers under. The very top of the set was chopped off from view in the initial Paris scene but nothing missed after that."

"S24 and 25: (Jamie Coniam). Pretty near the back, but had a great view of all the action. This is not a big theatre by any stretch of the imagination, and even right at the back we could see well. There is quite a big overhang, but it doesn't seem to matter as there was no action at higher points of the stage anyway".

“Rear Stalls: (Jessica). We were very disappointed because we could not see the projections properly, it cut off the top of the barricade and the sound quality did not seem to match the wow factor it had had at the Palace Theatre."

"Rear Stalls: While those are good seats, you miss a bit at the top of the barricade. I was a bit annoyed when I couldn't see the tail end of The Final Battle. I could really only see Enjolras' legs and a bit of the flag. That's such an iconic part of the show, and we were all leaning forward to see it."

"V22 and 23: Right at the very back of the stalls. A better view than I expected; you can’t see the top of the stage, but apart from the stuff on the barricade you don’t miss too much, and you do not have to keep moving to let people in and out. I am a dedicated box user, and this private little row was alright by me. (Extra seats have now been added beside these, to form a group of five rather than a pair - editor).”
 

DRESS CIRCLE 
Layout:
The Upper Circle overhangs the Dress Circle at row C. The top of the stage is not visible from row H back.

Seats are in a single central block, with a row of slip seats (with “loges” - small balconies behind) either side of the circle front, between the circle boxes and the stage.

The audience enter through the front of the circle near row C, with an exit at the back of the circle as well.

Legroom:
Reasonable for all but the tallest in most seats.

Rows A and L have a little less legroom - L particularly is tighter. Choose end outer aisle seats in rows B to K for space to stretch one leg.

Reader Ashley, in G12 and 13 feels,
"Legroom was ample - I'm 6'1" and my girlfriend is 5'10" and neither of us were uncomfortable at all."

Slip seat legroom is dire in seats 0 and 36 (as in, there isn't any at all), then very cramped in seats 2,3, 33 and 34, then cramped in 4, 5, 6, 31, 32 and 33. End seats 7 and 29 allow you to stretch sideways slightly into the aisle, so have the most available. Not for those over 5ft 9 or so, though.

Loge seats are movable chairs, 2 on each side. Just shift the chairs to face the front, and they are very comfortable, notes the monkey.

Choosing Seats in General:
Centre Block:
The curve of the Dress Circle makes the front corners of the stage invisible from the outermost seats. At second price, though, the monkey liked row B4 and 23 for reasonably compensating for the view against price. One for a fan who wants to see the show again and isn't worried about the small parts of the missing view. A 9, 10, 26 and 27 are comparable too, but with less legroom.

Best value seats at top price are rows B back to J from 7 to 20, 22, 23 or 24 depending on row length. Oddly, though the view of the lighting is great here, the monkey likes the mid stalls slightly better...for no good reason at all!

Rows K and L at the back of the circle are worth considering only if stalls at the same price are not available.

Row L rests on the back gangway of the circle so you will feel and hear those escaping early, but you get a head start to the exit. Last pick, as it has least legroom too.

Slip Seats:
Row A slip seats 0 to 7 and 29 to 35 are in the corners of the circle with a view obscured by the boxes next door. One third of the rear stage is not visible unless you lean. Sit here for a cheap but uncomfortable night out. Prices in this row are more proportional to view. If paying £45, though, the monkey would take central seats in the centre upper circle, rear dress circle or stalls before these.

Slip seats row A 0, 1, 35 and 36 are being sold exceptionally cheaply due to the same restricted view. Very close to the stage, with a pretty good view for the money, these are a possibility for those willing to endure VERY - and the monkey MEANS very - cramped conditions. If you are less than 5ft or so tall, with weight in proportion, sit here. Most others won't stand a chance of surviving until the interval, though, feels the monkey.

Loge Seats:
Two sets of two "loge" seats. Two chairs are placed in an area behind and above the slips, fronted by a wall that curves round to meet the side boxes. The chairs can be moved to face the stage, and only the nearside eighth or so of action is lost. The monkey would sit here for sure, grabbing the seat further forward first, by turning up early.

This location is primarily to allow wheelchair users to sit with friends, as chairs can be removed and replaced by them. For this reason, it isn't sold to the general public until the theatre is sure it won't be needed for them.

Loge 2 has slightly more room for wheelchair users. Alternatively, a seat in row D can be transferred into. The loge has as good a view.
 

General Hazard Notes:
Circle curve reduces views from outermost seats.

Centre row A seat 18 has a projector strapped to the circle wall in front of it. This doesn't affect sightlines.

Row L can be noisy as people exit behind it.

Row A slip seats have lesser views and legroom.
 

Changes for the current production:
Seats in the centre of the front rows A to E are sold at premium prices. The view is excellent from 16 to 19 here especially, whether you wish to spend the extra is totally your choice, feels the monkey...

Reader Comments:
"A 4, 5 and 6: These are right at the side of the theatre, like a mini balcony. The view was great for the price but we did need to lean forward. Foot room was very restricted which meant my legs being at a less than 90 degree angle for the whole performance which was a bit uncomfortable in my tight jeans! I'd choose the seats again but definitely wear loose trousers! I am 5'11."

"A25: (Jon). Excellent View - lack of leg room. I'm "broad" and width wise was O.K. and seat comfortable, but at 5'11 leg room was cramped as you have the wall in front so can't even get your feet under as you might with seats in the stalls."

“A35 and 36: “Les Misérables,” (Chris B). These seats are the furthest round to the left of the stage on the front row of the dress circle. However with the curve they are actually level with the front row of the stalls. You do feel incredibly close to the action and therefore very involved. They are classed as restricted but we got a great view and only had to lean forward now and again. The legroom is sufficient in A35 but a little tight in A36. But at a slip of the full price tickets, these seats are amazing value!”

"B18 and 19: (James – regular reader). Superb – as they should be at that price!"

"B21 and 22: (Shamie). Didn’t pay full price. Was just as previously described on this site. We were just 3 seats in from the end of the row which curves. Not a problem as only a tiny bit of stage front left is obscured. However in row A below they lost bottom half of stage due to the wall in front, and consequently leant forward on the wall which didn't help our view. Luckily my friend had an empty seat in front of her. Determined not to have my night out ruined I asked the guy in front to sit back in his seat and to give him credit he did manage to sit back for most of the show. For this reason I wouldn't recommend the last four seats at either end of row B and would avoid anything but the middle 16 seats of row A. No point paying top price for the rest of the row when you will get a better view from the stalls. Seats comfortable enough given the length of the show and plenty of legroom (I am 5' 8")."

"B22 and 23: Were excellent. We had a clear view of the stage as the people in front of us in row A didn’t need to lean forward (or were just being courteous!) and leg room was pretty good too for a circle seat. You perhaps miss a fraction of the action on the extreme left hand side of the stage but it was certainly nothing to worry about."

"C18 and C19: (James – regular reader). Excellent view and good sound from here but I’m still undecided as to whether it’s better to be in the Dress Circle or the Stalls. Perhaps you feel more “involved” downstairs but I think the view is possibly better slightly higher up."

"D6 and D7: They are both excellent seats. The legroom is adequate though. I am 5' 10" . Personally, I find the front of the dress circle is the best place to be"

"D6 and D7: (Diego). These are marked as good ones on the theatremonkey map, and I can see why; stage view was great and I didn't miss anything."

“D16 and 17: (Ali). Excellent.

"D18: A premium £85 seat sold to me at £36 plus £3 booking fee at TKTS Booth on the day. If I'd paid full price, (not that I would, premium seats being just a rip off in my view), I would have been a little bit disappointed. I believe the theatre has been refurbished and all new seating installed. I found the seat a bit uncomfortable and I'm only 5'6. It's the first time I've ever sat in a Dress Circle seat and had the rows in front (and I'm talking row C as well as B and A) leaning forward. D18 is just off centre; the view is generally fine, but I did have to sit bolt upright to see over the heads of those in the front 3 rows. A tad uncomfy for a show of this length. I'm also not a fan of there being no centre aisle; when your dying to go to the toilet before Fantine's death in the long first act it's not good to get out of a central seat without disturbing a lot of people. I managed to wait till the end of the Act but it was touch and go... I really must remember that 2 pints of beer and a bottle of Coke is not a good idea before this show."

"D24 and 25: (Felicity). They proved to be brilliant! There was no one sitting to our left which made everything a bit more roomy and the view itself was fantastic. The dress circle is always my place of choice to sit and we had got the tickets through an offer, so they were great value for money. I even had a very tall man sitting in front of me and I could still see everything. We could see everything perfectly, which is a bonus for me as I am terribly short sighted but I felt very close to the action. So all in all they were very good seats."

"E7 and E8: They were fine."

"E17 to E20: (James). Great view and good sound."

“E18 and 19: (Cathy). Perfect view.”

"E20 and 21: (Natalie). Recommended as full price seats. We had a fantastic view and loads of legroom. Amazing."

"E1 to E3: Having purchased 'Best available' tickets from Lastminute.com, at £35 + £1 booking fee per ticket. Whilst this was reasonable value, I wouldn't buy these seats at full price. E1 in particular had a slightly restricted view, and you couldn't catch some of the action going on in the far right of the stage."

"F4 to 7: (November 2007). The seats were perfect for sight lines and comfort, but alas on this my fourth visit, we all found most of the first act very heavy going. The sound was very loud were we were sitting (louder and shriller than it seemed from the front of the stalls about a year ago)"

"F8 and 9: Leg room is quiet snug, however it offers a overall good view of the stage, maybe a bit far back to be classed as top price seats. However, during the barracks scenes this must be seen as a bonus as it allows you to take in the whole of the force of the staging."

"G1 and 2: I notice from your seating plan these were highlighted in RED. Well, I can honestly say from our experience these were both comfortable seats and had a good overhaul view of the stage. I think it is so easy to be picky with any seat you have! Be happy with the price you pay and enjoy this Fabulous Show!!!!!"

"G1 to 4: Bought from TKTS at a discount in 2012. Right on the edge of the row and I noticed were red on the all seeing, all hearing, and all knowing Theatremonkey seating plan, so was slightly worried. I have to say that there was nothing wrong with them at all! Yes they were slightly to the right hand side but I had a very clear view of the stage and didn't miss anything. Maybe at full price and with a production which sees a lot of action on the right hand side of the stage would create the 'little red mark' but I thought the seat was fine. (Theatremonkey ratings are indeed based on paying full price (plus any agency fees if applicable, up to 25% extra). Discounted seats always get at least 1 grading higher, explains the monkey).”

"G5 and 6: The Queen’s Theatre is a lot more ‘cosy’ than the Palace. We found the seats were comfortable enough. These were the best available during “Kids week” and meant that, with one seat costing £65, my daughter’s seat was free. The aircon was not great – warm and humid in London that evening and got almost uncomfortably warm in the Dress Circle (my daughter was annoyed at the many people in the audience using their programmes as fans). Thanks to other contributors comments about the ladies toilet facilities, my daughter sprinted up as soon as the interval came – so avoiding the 20+ minute queue that didn’t clear until well after the 2nd act had started. Without the detailed analysis of the seating options contained on the website I doubt I would have found seats that were as well placed."

“G9 and 10: (Cathy). Perfect view.

"G10 to 13: (Ali). Good view, obstructed only by the very tall man in front!"

"G10: "Les Mis", (James). It was OK, but I feel that Les Mis’ new home is slightly more intimate and requires you to be a little closer to the action. I subsequently sat in Dress Circle C8 and felt much more involved. However, from previous visits to the show at the Palace Theatre, I find the show is best seen from the Stalls."

"G12 and 13: (Ashley). These were probably the best seats I've ever had in either theatre for 'Les Mis.' As the website says, the top of the stage is obscured from row H backwards, and so the Upper Circle bordered the stage perfectly at the top."

"G14, 15, 16: Paid full price for these. Great seats, plenty of legroom and a central, uninterrupted view of the action. Wouldn't have wanted to be any further back, though, as the overhanging upper circle cuts off the top of the stage after row H. Daughter said she couldn't see the performers' legs from her seat - but not too much of a problem as not a single one of them sang through their legs."

"G20 and G21: (Brian S). Priced at £56.50 – a good value price. These seats are in the ‘good’ zone as per the seating plan on this website and I would agree with that analysis. We could see the entire stage and all the associated special effects."

"Row K: (November 2004). Although at first I thought we would be too far away it was not too bad and we had a clear view. What we all felt was that the sound was not good - whether the overhang of the Dress Circle was the cause or not I don't know but to me it did not have the same feel to it as when it was at The Palace. (In January 2006, reader Ali reports this sound problem not noticeable any longer - good news, felt the monkey).”

"L1 and 2: (Sam). The view is clear, and you don't feel far from the stage. However, you can't see very well the top of the stage. The stars are not seen during "Stars". Good legroom as well. I agree with the Theatremonkey assessment, and I would even upgrade them to green if you can get them at good discount!"

"Row L: These seats were on at the very back of the Dress Circle. Plenty of legroom - although the view was obscured by the upper circle overhang, making it difficult to see the top gantry of the set, also felt slightly removed from the "action". Not helped by having our backs to the doors. I'm sure there are better available for the same price."

“L7 and 8: (J. Hockley). Not a bad view but not great. I couldn't see the first line of the words on the back drop, and when people stood on the top of the gantry I could only see legs. Even Gavroche, the boy, had his head missing.”

"Slip Seat A0: (June 2011). Having seen 'Les Mis' multiple times before, I wanted a cheap(er) seat that wouldn't break the bank, but would offer an amazing view and sound quality. At £20, this seat was amazing! Although the ticket said slight restricted view, you don't miss any of the action whatsoever. The seat is so close to the stage, I felt more in with the action than I ever have sitting in the stalls or main section of the dress circle. Also, as for limited legroom- I am 6ft 2, and yes it is a bit tight, but it doesn't affect the enjoyment of the show whatsoever! I have thoroughly recommended this section to friends and family, and is worth well in excess of the £20 price! Amazing seat, amazing location, will definitely be booking seats here in the future."

"Slip Seats A0 and A1: I thought they were very good value for money. Yes legroom is a bit tight, but I didn’t think unbearably so (I’m 5’10”) and certainly stayed the whole show! My 14 year old daughter liked this position too and I think the only thing we really missed was Jean Valjean lifting the cart. I would have no qualms about sitting there again at the price or recommending them to others - don’t make them green though – don’t want everyone after them!"

"Slip Seats A1 and A2: (Kirsty). These seats are in red according to the plan, and deserve to be so, based on the view that you get. You cannot see much of the stage on the far side unless you lean over the bar which is what my friend and I did, along with the other people in our part of the row. The seats were quite comfortable, and for me personally were worth the £15 I paid for them using an offer (however, I am easily pleased lol)."

"Slip Seats A4 and A5: After much deliberation I booked these. I have to agree in part with other readers views that these seats would be normally best avoided due to the very side on seating position. I would however disagree with the very tight leg room (I am 6'1" and found it no worse than any other theatre or football ground which I have been to). The fact is that you are unable to see the very extremities of the stage (My partner and I were on the right hand side as you look towards the stage and couldn't see a very tiny part of the singing action at one point); however this is compensated for by a reduced ticket price (and an indication that you have to possibly lean forward on the tickets). I would certainly by a similar position again for a similar price."

“Slip Seat A36: I purchased my ticket only four hours before the show started and chose to sit in A36, Dress Circle for £20, and let me just tell you that the seat is perfectly fine, I could even see more than the ones to my right on seats A29 to 35. Yes, you miss the first ten seconds of two entrances, but that really is all - and you still feel part of the show (maybe even more than on the more expensive seats on Dress Circle and definitely more than everyone on the Upper Circle)."

"Loge 1: (Mark Lane). £45 each seat. Bought 2 seats for this at theatre box office at 7.10 pm, chosen in favour of stalls side seats at £67. The seats here are excellent, and a steal at £45. Given the choice I would go for Loge 2 on the other side of the house but what you actually miss from here is minimal compared to the reduced pricing. Legroom was fine as you can position the chair either side facing or front facing. You can lean to your hearts content without disturbing anyone, but I never needed to and I'm only 5ft6. It is extremely handy for getting out at interval being right by the exit door and beating all the rushes to get out and back in again. Good to know if, like me and my friend, you're part of the people or are banished to the pavement for a nicotine fix."
 


Dress Circle Boxes
Layout:
Either side of the stage.

Legroom:
Acceptable as movable chairs are used.

Choosing Seats in General:
About a fifth of the stage isn't visible. Better seats elsewhere.

General Hazard Notes:
Side views.

Changes for the current production:
Not in use - boarded up due to rioting by students on stage.

Reader Comments:
None.

 

UPPER CIRCLE
The monkey carried out a full reassessment following new seating in November 2012. The following is based on "first impressions," so feel free to add your opinions: contact us.

Layout:
Rows AA to C are unbroken rows.

From row D back, the Upper Circle is split into two by a central aisle.

The rake is helped by plinths installed under each row of seats.

The audience enter through the front of the circle near row C, with an exit at the back of the circle as well.
 

Legroom:
Tending towards cramped in all seats, worst in rows AA, A and L.

Centre and end aisle seats allow one leg to stretch (no centre aisle seat in rows AA to C). Row D also has a gap between seats 12 and 13 to stretch into.

There seems to be slightly more legroom in the outer seats than towards the centre, and in rows from B to J than elsewhere. A fraction, but can make a difference, it felt.
 

Choosing Seats in General:
A good rake and not being too high above the ground make most seats except row AA and the first and last two or three in rows B to G at least fair value. You don't feel far from the stage anywhere, and even if the curve of the circle cuts off the edges and very front inch of the stage, the overall view of the show is rather pleasing felt the monkey. Oh, and some 20 new speakers help the sound.

In row AA, the monkey would skip seats 6,7, 21 and 22 just because seats 4 and 23 beside them are cheaper and have about the same view.

More centrally, the discount for AA 12 to 16 is there for a good reason - the lights in front are there. Many will tolerate it, some may not.

Row AA has also been adjusted to provide better "offsetting" so that those in row A behind can see between the seats more easily. Still, at second price choose row B first (slightly better angle over the wall) then move alphabetically back. These rows are the same price as rear stalls, though, and row S down there is mighty comfy, feels the monkey...

At third price Row G seats 9 to 17 are first choice, though remember that aisle seats have a metal post ahead them - some purists may quibble - and Row J is a little overpriced (one row back has the same view and is much cheaper).

The edges of the rows are all considered restricted view, and have been priced accordingly. The thin strip of lower price seats offers reasonable value - the monkey would choose row J first, then go forward from there when buying as the circle angle improves the view the further back you are.

At one below bottom price, the angle affects many seats. Row J 1 and 2 are little affected, though, and are particularly worth considering felt the monkey. Really the pair to choose for a cheap night out, for sure - and ladies will find them convenient for the "ladies" too. Row H 1 and 2 in front are almost as good.

For the rest, at almost bottom price, the curve loses the edges of the stage - a good fifth of it. First timers in particular should consider spending a little more, perhaps, though former Palace balcony dwellers will be quite pleased with these seats. No great bargains, but somewhere to hear the show from (if you've seen it before) and less metalwork to get in the way.

Monkey advice is to go for the seats as close to the more expensive ones as possible in all rows, taking rows G, E, D, C or K first. Then decide if you are happy to lose a little more view in B or A, or prefer a centre view in L. Row L has less legroom than B, A or AA but a better view... your call, feels the monkey (who would take an aisle seat in A, then aisle L, then the rest of L or AA itself - but brace for an uncomfortable evening in that last option). Actually, it would again look to rear stalls at the same price before any of these, for comfort as much as anything else.

And then there are the cheapest seats in the house. Row A 1, 2, 28 and 29. They lose about a third of the stage, but are VERY cheap. 2 and 28 have a better view, 1 and 29 more legroom by a fraction. Don't discard them as a bargain option for the shorter and impecunious, feels the monkey.

Standing space has a comfortable wall to lean on behind row L. Doesn't help the comfort of those seated in L all that much, though...



General Hazard Notes:
Lighting strapped to the wall in front of AA12 to 16 is irritating and potentially intrusive for purists.

A large rail at the front of the centre aisle beside row E intrudes into the view of those in the aisle seats of all rows behind. It is present in the "top corner" of your view of the stage. May irritate some, but the legroom on the aisle could well overcome that.

The curve of the circle cuts views for all outermost seats.

Metal posts at the ends of the front three rows do not affect the view significantly - though purists will want to know about them and take evasive action.

Leaners on the back wall may upset those in row L.
 

Changes for the current production:
None.

Reader Comments:
"Row AA: These front row seats are so restricted in leg room. I'm only 5ft 2 and by the interval I was in agony being so cramped and had to move! For the small extra price, I would far rather have the cheap slip seats in the Dress Circle. Much better all round - so involved with action and room to move!"

"Row AA13 to 15: These are listed as having a 'slightly restricted view'. We were a little concerned when booking as we weren't sure what exactly constituted 'slightly restricted', but they were £10 cheaper than others in the row and they were right in the centre of the row - and at the front - so we took the risk. Yes, they do have a restricted view insofar as you have to lean forward to see the very front of the stage. There is a lighting rig just in front of these seats which is why they are sold at a reduced price, however, I looked at the people sitting in the dearer seats on either side and they were also leaning forward so we felt the £10 saving per ticket was worth it. Granted on a couple of occasions we may have leant forward very slightly more than the others in the row, but I really didn't feel it was a problem.

You also cannot see the orchestra pit from these seats (because of the lighting rig), not sure if this would be an issue for anyone other than those with relatives in the orchestra?? I am sure the rows behind us must have had a restricted view to some degree too (especially with row AA all leaning forward on the balcony wall), however I don't know this for a fact.

The balcony wall has a velvet padded surface, so was very comfortable to rest arms/elbows on, and isn't too high. My husband said his back was aching a little from leaning forward throughout, but I loved the show and was so engrossed that I didn't feel uncomfortable (we're in our 40s). My mum was with us too (in her 70's) she didn't complain that her back ached, but did say she kept getting pins and needles in her hands from leaning forward on her elbows. This wasn't an issue; she just moved her arms now and again. I imagine the seats may not be suitable for those with any kind of back problem. There is no extra legroom for being in the front row. None of us have long legs, so this wasn't a problem. For theatre goers with long legs, it may prove uncomfortable by the end of the three hours!

The seat/bottom parts of the seats themselves are angled very slightly downwards. I'm not sure why this is, unless is allows a little more legroom? It wasn't enough to be obvious. If you sit back in your seat, you probably lose the front third of the stage. For those familiar with the show, you can see from the about drain/manhole cover and beyond (depending on your height I guess!).

I would be happy to book these seats again, we felt they were good value for the price."

"AA 17 and 18: Excellent value with a clear view of all the stage and the only real need for leaning forward was early on in the performance when Jean Valjean was being beaten up by the policeman for being on parole! It's true that I usually sit on my coat to give myself extra height (being only 5'4") but partner was delighted with his view and said he'd book those seats again. The four seats to his right (from memory 13, 14, 15, 16) might get a bit hot in the summer being directly behind lighting rig but I do not think lights would interfere with viewing as quite low down. Leg room is not plentiful, but that is one perk of being short!"

"A3: I went on Friday 16th August 2013 and paid £24.50 for a group booking and I was in seat A3. I would not choose to sit in this seat again as my view was obscured by the heads of the people in row AA. As soon as the lights went down the whole of row AA leaned forward to lean on the barrier in front of them which from my seat succeeded in obscuring anything that was happening at the front of the stage. I spent a lot of time admiring the large chandelier! Theatre etiquette in the "cheap seats" was also pretty poor with no intervention from theatre staff to stop the talking and the checking of smart phones which regularly illuminated people's faces. Due to the curve and being seated on the edge of the row I was very aware of this out of the corner of my eye and it proved very distracting. I last saw "Les Mis" at the Palace in 1992 and was blown away by it (rear of stalls) and was saddened that I did not feel the same this time. The sound quality was not as good and up in the gods sounded a bit thin. I didn't feel emotionally connected to the production, and I think this largely was because I struggled to see the action on stage for 70% of the show.
In a nut-shell: avoid A3 in the upper circle, especially if it's your first time seeing "Les Mis."

"A29 (March 2012), (Catherine). I mostly bought it because I was hoping the performance might not be that well attended and they would close the upper circle... but no such luck this time, I guess it doesn't always work. This is not a seat for someone who wants to be comfortable! However, if you can get yourself into the right position, sort of twisted and leaning forwards (!) you can see two thirds of the stage. I think the equivalent seat on the other side might be slightly better as a few things happened at the front of the stage on the left (is that one stage right? I can never remember) whereas not much happens on the other side that I can remember so I think you might miss a bit less? For £10 you really can't complain, and I would probably get it again if funds were low! Having said that, I moved during the interval as there were a few empty seats behind me. I ended up in B26, which was actually a pretty good seat, just missing a tiny bit of the stage. I heard lots of people in row AA complain that they couldn't see the front of the stage, and in row A that they couldn't see because AA were leaning forwards."

"B18 and 19: (Felicity). The seats cost quite a lot of money for their position and the barrier in front completely cuts off the downstage right corner of the stage where an awful lot of the action happens. The barrier also makes the people in row AA lean forward which causes a domino effect for everyone behind. Apparently they're not classed as restricted view seats because the producer feels they give a good clear view of the stage, which is not true at all. My view was further hampered by a very large man sitting in front of me who blocked most of the stage and spent all of the time leaning forward as the people in front of him were doing the same."

"D1: (Ali). £22 (with booking fee) so a nice budget seat, was prepared to sacrifice some view, however it seems that a lot of the intimate moments (people on their knees, dying, all that kind of solo stuff) happened in the bottom corner of the stage that was obscured for me. I could lean forward and just about see what was going on, therefore Row D at the other end probably has a much better viewpoint, nothing much at all happened in the other corner!
Thankfully the guy in front of me with the large head moved along after five minutes to an empty seat, thus giving me a pretty decent view for most of the show, save Marius’ head in an early scene. The big let down of this seat for me was the sound, or lack thereof. There was no oomph, no power in the big crescendos, in fact the only loud noises I could hear were motorbikes in the street and when any gunfire happened on stage! The usher wandering up and down was a little distracting for me also. On the plus side you are first out for the ladies, and for the bar. However, I’d take this seat again if the sound was sorted out!"

"D 17 and 18: (Tim Holloway). Slightly disappointed by the view. Even though I could see everything (despite the best efforts of those in row A to obstruct the view by leaning over the balcony) it wasn't the best angle to watch the show from".

"F19: (Sam). It is little bit high, but good view. Good legroom. However, I think the final battle is affected. You can actually see the lights that give the illusion of fire, and I could also see someone (supposedly dead LOL!) descending the barricade to arrange himself. For someone who saw the show so many times it doesn't really matter that much, but I wouldn't recommend it for first timers, unless they are really poor students.”

"G3: It is restricted view, and the Monkey gives it red. I certainly wouldn't advice this seat for first timers. But, if you are a regular, and on tight budget, then it is not bad seat. True, you see all sorts of things you are not supposed to see :), and you are little bit far, but on the other hand, the restriction is minimal, especially if you know what is going on, and it is only £12.50. So, it is red in absolute terms, but it could be seen as white for "les Miz" regulars, or even green if you are high in desperation for your fix, but very low on money, lol"

"J1 and 2: (Amanda Johnston) Booked on Theatremonkey.com recommendation and wanted to say thank you. The tickets were very reasonable, £21.50 each. The seats were handy for the ladies, not too far from the exit and the upper bar was quiet at the interval. The view of the stage was very good and the only bit we missed was the very front right of the stage and if there were people on the barricades we missed their heads, but that didn't happen often. Thanks for the great advice."

"J7 and 8: Perfect view, perfect price, very comfortable (I didn't have to fidget once). However the arm rests are quite small and as both people on either side of me used them, my arms had to hang and I got pins and needles in them! Maybe it's just me, but just in case you're prone to pins and needles, it's something to look out for."

"J9 and 10: (Emma). Sold at £32.50 each aren't very good at all. I felt, all in all, the Upper Circle is very over priced with the front rows being sold at £42.50. The 2 rows behind J are sold at a 'restricted view' price of £21, but your view is restricted in row J. Marius' head was cut off when he first appeared on stage, and so was anyone else's when they stood on the bridge. I had to lean so far forward throughout the entire performance that I got back ache. I could not see over the woman's head in front of me and she wasn't even very tall. I was extremely uncomfortable and just wished I'd paid the extra to sit in the Dress Circle or Stalls. I personally feel they are overpriced for how far back you are. Maybe they should also be reduced to £21. I would avoid these seats again."

"L1: (Taljaard – regular reader). Very good view, excellent sound and at only £20 quite a bargain.

"Standing": A friend and I wanted to see 'Les Mis' on a Saturday evening. We're both unpaid interns in London, and don't have a lot of money to spare. I'd seen the show twice in London already, only had good things to say about it, and wanted to take her along for her first viewing. Standing room tickets are only sold once the house has sold out (which it has pretty much every night in the wake of the film). We were able to buy them around 3pm for the 7:30pm show, although I imagine it might be smart to turn up a little earlier. Tickets are only £10 on weekdays and £12.50 on weekends.

We were standing in the Upper Circle behind row L. There's a comfortable wall in front of you to lean against and put your drinks on, although I had to wonder how the people in row L felt about that. I was constantly worried I was going to knock my drink onto them. And I know that I wouldn't want a bunch of people (10 people are allowed in the standing area) hovering over the back of my seat the entire time. But they didn't seem to notice or care.

We used binoculars. They were too close at times (really only beneficial when one person is on stage or when you want to pay attention to a specific part on stage). Otherwise, you miss the rest of the staging. Still - it was nice to have a chance to get a closer look when we wanted to.

I think the Upper Circle is a perfectly fine view. I've been seated in the back of the stalls before with the dress circle overhang, and while those are good seats, you miss a bit at the top of the barricade. From the upper circle, you do miss a little during "Paris/Look Down" when Eponine, Marius, and Enjolras are using the bridge at the very top but they don't spend a lot of time up there. You can see Enjolras flip over the bar on the barricade and climb down in order to arrange himself for his death scene. As someone who has seen the show it didn't bother me, but for first timers it could take them out of the moment a little (my friend noticed and found it fascinating, so it really depends). Either way, just be assured that most of the time the actors climb down from from the top to come into view for all of the audience. Nothing too vital happens up there. Although, I was a bit annoyed when I sat in the back of stalls and couldn't see the tail end of The Final Battle. I could really only see Enjolras' legs and a bit of the flag. That's such an iconic part of the show, and we were all leaning forward to see it. However, from the standing room in the upper circle, it was no problem at all (almost too good of a view considering we could see how he flips over!)

We're in our twenties so we were fine standing for that long - might be a little harder for older audience members. The nice thing about the standing room is that there's no way you can distract anyone else in the audience, so you're free to stretch a little, roll your shoulders, (quietly!) walk around a bit. The privacy is nice, just make sure you're not disturbing the other standees.

I will say it was ridiculously hot up there, but I think that's pretty normal. The only complaint I have (and this doesn't at all impact the actual show) is that it's really difficult to see the actors take their bows during the curtain call. In the likely event there's a standing ovation, you really can't see a thing. But, if you go around to the stage door and meet the lovely cast, that certainly makes up for it.

Another perk to standing - easy and quick access to the toilets. As soon as One Day More finished, I applauded, and then quickly headed to the bathroom for intermission. You don't have to worry about getting out of your seat and navigating through the aisles, so I was the first one there. Easy way to beat the never-ending queue!

Anyway, I'm rambling. Standing seats are outstanding for the price. Definitely worth it if you're low on money or just cheap (like me). And chances are you'll love the show enough to buy great seats in the future, because this show is truly a treat. I always recommend it to people who don't know what they want to see during their visits to London."

 

 

Upper Circle Boxes

Layout:
Either side of the stage.

Legroom:
Acceptable as movable chairs are used.

Choosing Seats in General:
About a fifth of the stage isn't visible. Better seats elsewhere.

General Hazard Notes:
Side views.

Changes for the current production:
Not in use - boarded up due to rioting by students on stage.

Reader Comments:
None.

 

 

 

Notes
Total 1065 seats.

Air-conditioned auditorium.

Infrared headsets available, Upper Circle gets least good reception. Guide dogs allowed in boxes otherwise dog sitters available. One transfer seat in Dress Circle row D accessed by fire door over a 5-cm step. Seats in the loges are removable for wheelchair users. Low box office desk for chair users. Adapted toilet in foyer corridor. Specific information can be obtained from the theatre group dedicated phoneline on 0844 482 5137. The "registered disabled" concessionary price policy here is generally (though can be subject to change) for a quota of accessible best seats to be made available at the lowest regular price charged. This quota is increased for designated performances such as signed / audio interpreted. Check with the box office at time of booking. A "venue access guide" from the team who created book "Theatremonkey: A Guide to London's West End," is available to download in PDF format by clicking here.

No food except Ice cream and confectionery. Bar snacks also available.

Three bars; Stalls, Dress Circle and Upper Circle.

8 toilets; Foyer 1 ladies 3 cubicles, Stalls 1 gents 2 cubicles, 2 ladies 3 cubicles, 4 cubicles; Dress Circle 1 gents 2 cubicles 1 ladies 3 cubicles; Upper Circle 1 gents 1 cubicle 1 ladies 4 cubicles.

A reader notes in July 2011,
"The toilet facilities at this theatre are abysmal. The queue for the 'ladies' in the dress circle was ludicrously long. My wife and daughter joined it at 2 o'clock and got to their seats at 2.25. I gave up queuing for the gents after about 20 minutes, but did manage to get in three hours later after the show!"

The monkey thanks David and his " box office crew" Francesca and Steve for their help in compiling this information. 

 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Getting to this Theatre
Find this theatre on a Street Map. The theatre is just behind the arrow, actually on Shaftesbury Avenue.
Nearest Underground Station Buses Car Park
Nearest Underground Station:
Piccadilly Circus - Piccadilly (Dark Blue) and Bakerloo (Brown) lines.

The escalator from the platforms ends in a large circular underground area. 

After leaving the barriers, turn to your left, and follow the curve of the barriers around until you see an exit to your right with the sign "Subway 4" over it. Walk under this sign.

Walk through this tunnel and take the first staircase to your right, marked "Shaftesbury Avenue", take the stairs up to the street.

At the top of the stairs, take a very sharp "U Turn" through 180 degrees to your left. Look forwards and upwards for the huge "Sanyo" sign. Walk forwards towards it.

The busy road to your left is Shaftesbury Avenue. If you see the Prince of Wales Theatre, and Trocadero centre, wrong way.

For the Queens Theatre cross the road and turn to your right, walk by or under the covered area (take your pick in the rain!) where the cash ATM's and street artists are. Walk straight on, crossing Denman Street, Great Windmill Street, Archer Street and Wardour Street and past the Lyric, Apollo and Gielgud Theatres. The Queens is the last one beyond these.

 

Buses:
14, 19, 22B, 38, 53, 88, 94, 159 To Shaftesbury Avenue.

 

Taxi:
A rank for Black taxis is at Charing Cross Station - a long distance from the theatre. Best chance of hailing one is in the street outside.

 

Car Park:
Shaftesbury Avenue. Cross the road, turn left, passing the Curzon West End Cinema and crossing Greek Street and Firth Street. The theatre is on your right. If you come to the Palace Theatre, wrong way.

Denman Street. Turn to your left as you leave the car park. If you see the Piccadilly Theatre, wrong way. Walk to the end of the street and turn left. Walk straight on, crossing Great Windmill Street, Archer Street and Wardour Street and past the Lyric, Apollo and Gielgud Theatres. The Queens is the last one beyond these.

Also possible is Newport Place, China Town. The "Theatreland Parking Scheme" may be available here. Call Q-Park car parks on 0870 442 0104 or see http://www.q-park.co.uk for details. At this car park, parking under the "Theatreland Parking Scheme" allows a 50% discount in cost. Spaces CANNOT be reserved at these prices, so choose whether you would prefer to book and pay more, or use this scheme.

If you choose the "Theatreland Parking Scheme", you must get your car park ticket validated at the theatre's box office counter (the theatre attendant will insert the car parking ticket into a small machine which updates the information held on the magnetic strip on the reverse, thus enabling the discount). When you pay using the machines at the car park, 50% will be deducted from the full tariff. You may park for up to 24 hours using this scheme and it is endorsed by the Society of London Theatre.

 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here


 

 

.



Site © Theatremonkey.com 2000 to 2014. "Theatremonkey"® and "Theatermonkey are a Registered Trade Mark. Buy your tickets with confidence here: Theatremonkey.com is an Affiliate Member of STAR - The Society Of Ticket Agents and Retailers - please do feel free to confirm its membership by clicking the verification system graphic (left). All rights reserved. Information on this site may not be reproduced in any form, by any distribution media, in whole or in part, without permission. This means that you MUST NOT copy graphics or text for posting on another website. Opinions expressed are those of the site owner and / or contributors, and are not those of the site host or service providers. Tickets sold from links on this site - and any other information given - are the responsibility of the supplying company, not theatremonkey.com.
Comments about this page are welcome Contact Us. No responsibility is taken for accuracy of information, No liability can be taken for loss relating to individual use of data contained on this site. 'About Cookies' and 'Our Website, Your Privacy': The theatremonkey.com website DOES NOT use "cookies" on its website at any time. It does link to sites which do use "cookies" to track sales / site navigation information. Click Here for more information - as required by the 2012 UK E-Privacy Directive. Use of this site constitutes agreement with the above. E&OE. Last Update: 22 October 2014 11:39