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Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

BARBICAN THEATRE

 

This venue runs a mixed programme of theatrical events.

www.barbican.org.uk is their website, with the latest details.

Events include:

29th April until 9th May 2015

The Royal Shakespeare Company in association with English Touring Theatre present:

A MAD WORLD MY MASTERS

by Thomas Middleton
edited by Sean Foley and Phil Porter
directed by Sean Foley

London, Soho... 1956. Where glamour rubs up against filth, and likes it; where the posh mix with musicians, whores and racketeers; where 'virginity is no city trade', and where a dashingly impecunious bachelor in need of quick cash and a good time has to live on his wits.

Turning con-man to fool his rich uncle, he variously becomes a lord, a high class call girl, and – God forbid – a poor actor. But a beautiful Soho tart is also on the scam: a whore to some, a religious instructor to others, and a debutante in need of an eligible bachelor to yet more...

Following its 2013 hit run in Stratford-upon-Avon and nationwide tour A Mad World My Masters comes to the Barbican for a strictly limited season in May 2015.


 

http://www.rsc.org.uk/whats-on/a-mad-world-my-masters is the event website.

Twitter: Please tag @TheRSC & @ETTtweet + #AMadWorldMyMasters

 

 

Performance Times:
Monday to Saturday at 7.30pm
Thursday and Saturday at 2.30pm and 7.30pm


 



Ticket prices:
£40, £30, £20, £10

 

 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Performance Schedule:
The monkey advises checking performance times on your tickets and that performances are happening as scheduled, before travelling.

Varies by event, see www.barbican.org.uk for details.
 

Ticket Prices:

Offers May be available - Click Here

Varies by event, see www.barbican.org.uk for details.
 
Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

 
Buying Tickets Online:

Other Box Office Information

Tickets offered differ between outlets. Outlets also may offer different seats via their phone and online systems. Offers may be available click here.
www.barbican.org.uk, run by the venue itself, provide the service for this theatre.
A brilliant box office system lets you select the actual seat you require from those available. Colour-coded by price, some day all booking systems will be this way, the monkey hopes.

A reader notes, though, that you can't buy concessionary priced tickets online - you need to telephone for those.

Booking fees per ticket for online bookings:
Online is cheaper than booking by phone. A mere £3 per transaction, not per ticket, fee applies.

Other Online Choices (with S.T.A.R. genuine ticket agencies):

Independent S.T.A.R. ticket agencies may also offer an alternative choice of seats.


 

Box Office Information:
Tickets offered differ between outlets. Outlets also may offer different seats via their phone and online systems. Offers may be available click here.
Theatre Box Office:
Telephone: 0845 120 7500.
(020 7638 8891  if you cannot use the 0845 number)
Operated by the venue's own phoneroom.

A reader notes that you can't buy concessionary priced tickets online - you need to telephone for those.

Booking fees per ticket for telephone bookings:
Online is cheaper than booking by phone. By telephone, a £4 administration fee is added to the total TRANSACTION cost for telephone bookings.
 

For personal callers or by post: Box Office, Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London. EC2Y 8DS
No booking fee for personal callers. Postal applicants pay a per transaction for use of a Barbican envelope, or can include their own, with stamp and pay nothing.
 

Special Access Needs Customers:
Wheelchair users and other registered disabled theatregoers can book their seats and enquire about concessionary prices that may be available to them on a dedicated phone line. See Notes.

www.barbican.org.uk is the official venue website.

 

 

 
Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Theatre Seat Opinions:
Please remember that cheaper seats often do not offer the same view / location quality as top price ones, and that ticket prices are designed to reflect this difference.

Note that resident company "Cheek By Jowl" often use a temporary seating layout on the stage. In this case seating is in portable grandstands, with plastic seating and little legroom. Go for the centre block is the monkey view - though be aware sightlines can alter for some performances due to the layout of the stage.
 

Seating Plan Diagram

Stalls Dress Circle Upper Circle Balcony Notes
STALLS 
Layout:
A single block of seats, the ends of which are slightly angled towards the stage.

The circles in this theatre are at the back of the stalls, so they do not noticeably overhang the seats except at the edges of the auditorium.

Legroom:
Good in all seats up to 5ft 10 or so, even better in the front row if a row is removed for any staging reason.

Choosing Seats in General:
For some reason, no matter which seat he chooses in this modern theatre, this monkey feels he cannot get a good view of the stage. The shape of the theatre and stage (no aisles, almost every row has a separate door leading into it) conspire to eliminate intimacy between actor and audience.

All seats officially have a clear view of the stage. Rows A to P seats 1 to 9 and 31 to 44 are at an angle to the stage. This is especially annoying in rows A to G, as the actors seem to be standing side on to the audience when viewed from these seats.

Frankly, avoiding the first and last 4 seats (6 in B to F, 5 in A) in all rows is worthwhile (unless heavily discounted, when they may well be worthwhile), and further back then row P is getting remote from the stage - poor value for money when you can usually sit near the front for the same price.

The good news is that sometimes the whole of row A is sold VERY cheaply - when it is, this can be a bargain for those happy with the angled view.

Otherwise, Theatremonkey's pick of the bad bunch are first, Rows E to G 11 to 27, then A to C 15 to 24, Row D 12 to 26, then Row H to P 11 to 30. 

Wheelchair spaces are at the rear of the stalls. The view here is on par with the rest of the seats, but users should take the Upper Circle first if possible as the view is better.

General Hazard Notes:
Claustrophobics: There are no aisles, entry is direct into long rows from each end.

Staging of all productions often restricts views for those at the ends of rows.

Reader Comments:
"
A 18: "Les Misérables" (September 2010). Fantastic seat for seeing the show, really close, however you do miss some of the footwork because the stage height and also the conductor was slightly in view. The seat was uncomfortable though and I just couldn't get comfortable."

B10 and 11: Big and Small – April 2012 (Chris B). This is the front row for this show so these seats have all the legroom you could wish for. They do feel very close to the stage but as it is a large stage that goes back a fair way you don't feel too close. They are, however, quite far the right as you look at the stage but if you are prepared to look slightly side on, it makes little difference to the viewing experience. It does feel very intimate and personal to be so close to the actors and especially for plays with only a handful of actors, I would recommend them.

 

DRESS CIRCLE
Called the CIRCLE in this theatre.

Layout:
This circle is overhung by the two circles above it, but the view is not affected.

Most seats are in a balcony overhanging the back of the stalls in two long rows without aisles.

The only seats closer to the stage are in two projecting side balconies, designated rows AA to HH.

Every row has a separate door leading into it, except AA to CC, which share an entrance.

Legroom:
Good for those up to around 5ft 9 in rows A and B.

In the slip seats, row AA has no legroom whatsoever. Row BB seats 2 and 14 have nothing in front. The rest of BB are suitable for those up to around 5ft 6 at most. Rows CC to HH are suitable for those up to around 5ft 7 at most.
 

Choosing Seats in General:
The majority of seats are at the back of the theatre, behind the stalls. Anyone sitting here gets a distant view of the stage. 

The only seats to consider are row B 9 to 51, followed at a pinch by row A 9 to 51. It is no surprise that circle prices are generally lower than the stalls.

General Hazard Notes:
A bar runs across the front of the circle's main block. This affects the view in all seats, and is only just tolerable in row B.

Theatre architecture ensures that the edges of the stage cannot be seen in side block rows AA to HH. The bar across the circle front further intrudes on the view here too.

Claustrophobics: There are no aisles, entry into rows A and B is direct into long rows from each end.

Reader Comments:
None.


UPPER CIRCLE
Layout:
This circle is overhung by the balcony above it, but the view is not affected.

Most seats are in two long rows overhanging the back of the stalls. Quirky design makes this circle closer to the stage than the Dress Circle below it.

The only seats closer to the stage are in two projecting side balconies, designated rows AA to EE.

Every row has a separate door leading into it from the outer ends, except AA to CC, which share an entrance.

Legroom:
Adequate for those up to around 5ft 8 at most, in rows A and B.

the slip seats, row AA has no legroom whatsoever. Row BB 1 and 12 are "double width" but only half the seat has legroom - by using the gap between the seat in front and the wall of the circle, a small triangle. Those up to around 5ft 8 and slim can do this.

Row CC 3 and 11 can pull the same trick with a slightly smaller gap. CC 1 and 13 allow the narrow-hipped to squeeze legs into the aisle beside BB in front - unlimited legroom across 40% or so of the seat for the small. Otherwise, like CC 2 and 12, legroom is nil for those over 4ft tall.

Rows DD and EE are suitable for those up to around 5ft 5 at most, though 3 and 11 in both rows can again take advantage of a tiny gap in front, between circle wall and seat in front - not nearly as wide as the gaps further forward, though.

Choosing Seats in General:
Lower prices and a closer view than the dress circle below make row A seats 8 to 14 and 51 to 57 quite good value, followed in order of merit by row B seats 16 to 52, then row A seats 15 to 50.

The pricing policy often sees row A seats 1 to 6 and 59 to 64 cheap but good value, even if the view is a little "sideways on" to the stage.

Wheelchair spaces are available in row B. These offer a fair view of the stage. Users may prefer these to the stalls as they seem closer to the action.

The only redeeming feature of AA and BB is the extra width of the seat and being in a row on your own. Shame about the legroom and view though. The extra wide seat was originally for two people, but the one and a half person width indicates why that idea was revised soon after opening - though it may make a comeback on singles night! At £10 or so each they are fair value, any more is way too expensive.

General Hazard Notes:
A bar runs across the front of the circle. This affects the view in all seats, and for the short is only tolerable in row B.

Claustrophobics: There are no aisles, entry into rows A and B is direct into long rows from each end.

Poor legroom in many slip seats.

Rows A and B end 4 seats appear lower than seats further along, and look over rows in front.

Reader Comments:
"
A11 and A12: "The Master and Margarita." Visibility very good from here. A clear view of the entire stage and the backdrop. This particular production involved clever interaction between stage and screen projections - I felt that we had the best of both worlds on this, had you been sitting in the stalls for example you wouldn't have been able to see the actors from an aerial position as we could. (sorry very complicated - you had to be there really!). There is a bar running along the circle but it's not obtrusive and I didn't find it restrictive. The seats are small and by that I mean not very wide and very poor on legroom. If you are over 5'6' you will struggle to stretch or get comfortable. Definitely not recommended for 6 footers. Wear something cool, it gets hot up here. Given the choice, at a push I would sit here again because the visibility was good and I am quite small in stature!

"A49 and 50: Carousel – August 2012 (Chris B). This circle does feel very high up but allows for a good overview of the entire stage, useful as there are plenty of people on stage at any one time. These seats are slightly left of centre but allow viewing of the whole stage. As this is the front row, there is a safety rail that is about 12 inches above the circle wall in front but as long as you sit back or lean forward slightly, it doesn't hinder the view at all. The legroom is sufficient if not ample, with plenty of space for your knees but I found my feet a little constricted, especially if you like to stretch out. An added bonus for musicals is you get a bird’s eye view into the orchestra pit which is always a treat."


BALCONY
Layout:
Most seats are in two long rows overhanging the back of the stalls. Quirky design again makes this circle closer to the stage than the Upper Circle below it - though high above the stalls...

The only seats closer to the stage are in two projecting side balconies, designated rows AA and BB.

Every row has a separate door leading into it from the outer ends.

Legroom:
Good in all seats for those up to around 5ft 8 or so, except row AA and BB, which have none. Row BB has a bit of toe-space on a black rubber strip behind row AA. Using it may annoy the occupants of that row, though...

Choosing Seats in General:
The pricing policy often sees row A seats 1 to 8 and 55 to 62 and row B 1 to 8 and 56 to 63 cheap but good value, even if the view is a little "sideways on" to the stage.

Rows AA and BB project forward from the circle. The view is poor since they are at the very edges of the stage.

General Hazard Notes:
A bar runs across the front of the circle. This affects the view in all seats, and is only tolerable in row B.

The height may bother vertigo sufferers.

Claustrophobics: There are no aisles, entry into rows A and B is direct into long rows from each end.

Rows A and B end few seats are lower than the rest and look through more bars.

Views can be through a lot of lighting, which is often hung on bars below the level of the front of this circle.

Zero legroom in slip seats.

Reader Comments:
"Balcony": "Gross und Klein." Sat in the Upper balcony (almost on the roof - it was all I could get!!) - dreadful seats - shame on the Barbican for even selling them."




Notes
Total 1162 seats.

Air-conditioned.

Infrared headsets for Hire. Guide dog sitter available. Wheelchair access is good but maneuvering is tight in the Upper Circle. Adapted toilets available. Wheelchair users get free parking in the centre car parks.

Wheelchair users and other registered disabled theatregoers can book their seats on 020 7638 8891 and enquire about concessionary prices that may be available to them. The wheelchair users line connects directly to the venue box office in London. Wheelchair hire bookings on 020 7382 7021.

www.artslineonline.com has comprehensive details or call 020 7388 2227, artsline@dircon.co.uk. A "venue access guide" from the team who created book "Theatremonkey: A Guide to London's West End," is available to download in PDF format by clicking here.

Three bars shared with the rest of the theatre complex in the common foyers.

A range of cafes and restaurants in other parts of the centre. Ice cream and confectionery in the auditorium.

Toilets on all levels of the common foyer outside the auditorium. Note that a comedian designed the basin taps. It looks like they are "break beam for water" types. HOWEVER: a sign on the water spout indicates you should tread on something nasty. It actually means you need to tread on the black rubber pads on the floor below the basin to get water out of the spout. The monkey felt like it had "won a crystal in the Crystal Maze" for figuring that one out...

 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Getting to this Theatre
Find this theatre on a Street Map
Nearest Underground Station Buses Car Park
Nearest Underground Station:
Two choices; Barbican - Circle Line (yellow), Hammersmith and City (light purple), Metropolitan (dark purple). Theatremonkey prefers Moorgate - Circle Line (yellow), Hammersmith and City (light purple), Metropolitan (dark purple) and Northern (black).

THEN:

From Barbican, follow the yellow line to the centre along walkways. 

From Moorgate the walk is shorter, at street level, for the adventurous. This monkey's route is to exit the station on Moorfields. It prefers the "West Side" exit. If you can use this one too (take the left hand exit), you will emerge facing a road, with a building opposite to the right. This building is called "Tranter House". Turn to your right and cross the road to it....pause a moment.

If you came out of the "East Side" exit of Moorgate Underground Station, you too will have a road in front of you, with a "Clinton Cards" on the far side of the road. Ignore it and look to your left. A "Dixons" shop is here. Turn to your left and walk in front of it, and keep going until you come to "Tranter House". Meet your friends here, and continue together to the Barbican Centre by...

Continuing along past "Moorfields House" until you come to the end of the street. There are no signs telling you, but you have come to "Ropemaker Street". Turn left into it, and walk along. You pass a pedestrian area on the left containing strange metal pyramids. Wonder at them as you pass. Keep going until you see ahead of you on a wall (across a roadway) a "Corporation Of London" Crest and signage. To the right of that is a tiny "Moor Lane" sign. Good news, you are in the right area!

Cross the road to this set of signs. Turn to your left and walk on passing a loading bay area. Just past this, is the turning into Silk Street. This is on your right. Take it and cross to the other side of the road.

Continue down it, passing blank walls with car park vents in them, to the Barbican Centre main entrance at the end of the road where it curves round. The centre is on the right, under the canopy with the statues on it. Careful the adjacent stage door and car park access ramps!

Ignore the curved entrance. Instead turn down the slope to the left immediately in front of it. Keep going, and the entrance to the centre is through the set of doors on the left at the bottom of the slope.

 

Buses:
8, 11, 22B, 25, 26, 56, 133, 141, 214, to Barbican / Moorgate. Follow yellow lines from Barbican, or directions above from Moorgate. Be aware that no buses stop outside the centre or close to it.

 

Taxi:
Book in advance - chances are low of hailing on on Moorgate.

 

Car Park:
Within the centre. Make careful note of the car park number and bay numbers before leaving or you will probably still be searching for your car until next year. Also note the public foot exits from the car park to the centre are hard to find and narrow. This feature amuses theatremonkey as it seems the builders were embarrassed about having a car park linked to their nice arts centre. Strange.
 
Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here



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