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Lyceum Theatre


21 Wellington Street, Covent Garden, London WC2E 7RQ 0844 871 3000

  • Where to buy tickets
  • Best seat advice
  • Seating plan/s
  • Getting to the theatre

Buying tickets online

Ambassador Theatre Group, the theatre group's own website provide the service for this theatre.

www.thelionking.co.uk, the official website, also shares the allocation, with the same prices and allocations as the theatre. It is available in English, French, Italian, German, Spanish, Swedish and Japanese language editions. This site also allows you to see the view from seats in every section of the auditorium - an outstanding and very easy to use feature.

Booking fees per transaction:
None.

 

Other Online Choices (with genuine S.T.A.R ticket agencies): 
Ticket agencies offer an alternative way to buy tickets, with booking fees differing from those charged by the theatre box office itself. They may have seats available or special offers when theatres do not.

Ticket agency prices vary in response to theatres implementing “dynamic pricing”  - which alters prices according to demand for a particular performance. Prices stated here were compiled as booking originally opened, current prices are advised at time of enquiry.

ALSO SEE Tickettree.com for great value "hotel and theatre ticket" packages.
Other Independent S.T.A.R. ticket agencies may also offer an alternative choice of seats.

TheatreMonkey Ticketshop

When the theatre does not have the tickets you desire available, it is well worth trying the Theatremonkey Ticketshop agency, telephone 020 7420 9778 (0044 207 420 9778 if calling from outside the United Kingdom). SAMPLE PRICES INCLUDE: £72.50 tickets with an £12.50 fee (£10.50 on £69.50, £8.75 on £57.50, £7.25 on £47.50, £6.50 on £42.50, £6.50 on £37.50, £5.25 on £35 seats Sunday to Friday / £30.50 on £139.50, £18.75 on £125, £24.75 on £112.50, £13.25 on £87.50, £11.25 on £75, £9 on £59.50, £7.50 on £49.50, £9.90 on £45, £8.50 on £39.50 on Saturdays and "peak" dates). PRICES VARY DAILY, AND THE SYSTEM WILL CONFIRM EXACT FEES AT TIME OF TRANSACTION. Moderate by agency standards, though higher than box office fees, worth trying as they often have an alternative choice of seats available! Note that this system will confirm exact seat numbers prior to purchase. A £1.95 per booking, not per ticket, handling fee may apply on some transactions by telephone. NO handling fee applies for online purchases.

See Tickets

Another alternative is www.seetickets.com. SAMPLE PRICES INCLUDE: £72.50 tickets with an £10.87 fee (£25 on £125, £22.50 on £112.50, £18.50 on £92.50, £16.50 on £88.50, £8.62 on £57.50, £7.12 on £47.50 seats Sunday to Friday / £30.50 on £139.50, £24.75 on £112.50, £19.25 on £88.50, £16.50 on £75, £13.25 on £59.50, £11 on £49.50, £9.90 on £45, £8.50 on £39.50 on Saturdays and "peak" dates) - and £2.75 per booking (not per ticket) postal charge. PRICES VARY DAILY, AND THE SYSTEM WILL CONFIRM EXACT FEES AT TIME OF TRANSACTION.

Ticketmaster

Another alternative is www.ticketmaster.co.uk. SAMPLE PRICES INCLUDE: £69.50 seats with a £4 (£11 on £125, £10 on £92.50, £3.50 on £47.50, £3.25 on £37.50 seats Sunday to Friday off-peak / £57.50 tickets with an £9.25 fee (£7.75 on £92.50, £7.25 on £57.50, £6.50 on £42.50, £3 on £37.50 seats Sunday to Friday / £27 on £139.50, £17 on £112.50, £11.75 on £88.50, £11.25 on £75, £9 on £59.50, £7.50 on £49.50 on Saturdays and "peak" dates). PRICES VARY DAILY, AND THE SYSTEM WILL CONFIRM EXACT FEES AT TIME OF TRANSACTION. A further £2.85 per booking (not per ticket) service charge or £3.05 for postage option if required and time allows, is also added. This system allows you to choose your own seats from the selection the company has available.

Encore Tickets

Encore Tickets (telephone 0207 400 1253 / 0044 207 400 1253 if calling from outside the United Kingdom). SAMPLE PRICES INCLUDE: £72.50 tickets with an £23.50 fee (£19.50 on £57.50, £16.50 on £47.50 seats Sunday to Friday / £40 on £139.50, £32.50 on £112.50, £23.50 on £88.50, £21 on £75, £17.50 on £59.50, £14.50 on £49.50 on Saturdays and "peak" dates). PRICES VARY DAILY, AND THE SYSTEM WILL CONFIRM EXACT FEES AT TIME OF TRANSACTION. A postage charge of £1.45 per booking, not per ticket may be applied to bookings made from UK addresses more than 5 days before the performance.

"Meal and Show" packages may also be available.

Quality and Value hotel / theatre ticket packages are also available.

London Theatre Direct

Londontheatredirect.com SAMPLE PRICES INCLUDE: £72.50 tickets with an £14.50 fee (£25 on £125, £22.50 on £112.50, £20 on £99.50, £18.50 on £92.50, £17.50 on £88.50, £11.50 on £57.50, £9.50 on £47.50, £8.50 on £42.50, £6.50 on £38.50 seats Sunday to Friday / £25 on £125, £20 on £99.50, £17.50 on £88.50, £15 on £75, £12 on £59.50, £10 on £49.50 on Saturdays and "peak" dates). PRICES VARY DAY, AND THE SYSTEM WILL CONFIRM EXACT FEES AT TIME OF TRANSACTION. Some prices may vary by date - the system will advise at time of enquiry. There is a £1 per booking, not per ticket, transaction fee for collecting tickets from the box office before your performance. Alternatively, if time allows, there is a postage to your home option, costing £2.95 (£4.95 to non-UK addresses) per booking, not per ticket. Optional Ticket Insurance is also available. Discounts and Meal and Show Packages may also be available.

Box office information

Telephone: 0844 871 3000
Operated by the Ambassador Theatre group's own phone room from 9am until 10pm (Sundays 10am until 8pm). Outside these hours the Ticketmaster agency answer calls on their behalf.

Disney Tickets on 0800 640 8101 (9am to 9pm, 7 days a week) also shares the allocation, with the same booking fee as the theatre.

Booking fees per ticket for telephone bookings:
None.

For personal callers or by post:
Wellington Street, London. WC2E 7RQ
No booking fee for personal callers. Open to personal callers from 10am until 8pm Tuesday to Saturday (until 6pm on Mondays and other days when there are no performances) and 12 noon until 3.30pm on Sundays when there are performances.

Special Access Needs Customers: 
Wheelchair users and other registered disabled theatregoers can book their seats and enquire about concessionary prices that may be available to them on 0800 912 6972.

 

Please remember that cheaper seats often do not offer the same view / location quality as top price ones, and that ticket prices are designed to reflect this difference.

This theatre uses "Dynamic Pricing," meaning that they could increase or decrease seat prices on some seats according to demand. The monkey noticed this particularly on "Premium Seats" in the centre block of the stalls on "Peak" performance dates. Information below is based on the 'basic' guide to pricing, which should allow readers to judge whether they are being asked to pay far more than usual for tickets...

An official "view from your seat" facility is available at www.lionkingseating.co.ukIgnore anything else online - this is the legal, genuine and exact one!

IN JANUARY 2017, THE NUMBERING IN THE STALLS, AND THE LETTERING FOR THE BOXES WAS CHANGED. IN OCTOBER 2018 THE DRESS CIRCLE UNDERWENT LAYOUT CHANGES. THEATREMONKEY HAS UPDATED ALL OF THIS.

  • Stalls
  • Stalls Boxes
  • Dress Circle
  • Dress Circle Boxes
  • Upper Circle

Stalls

Layout

The stalls are split into a large centre block and two narrow side blocks by aisles.
The Dress Circle overhangs the stalls at row R. The view of the top of the stage is affected from row T.

A gentle rake (sloped floor to help see over rows in front) begins about row C, and is more noticeable from row E back, though children may still prefer an aisle seat as it won't help them much.

Legroom

Good in rows E to ZB, adequate in rows A to D, and outstanding in row R seats 1 to 13 and 32 to 44 which have aisles in front.

Choosing seats in general

Centre Block: 
The centre block offers good value in all seats from rows A to P.

The monkey rated the first three rows highly, but recognises negative reader comments as equally valid. While it felt rows A to C worthwhile, this is obviously a case for many to make up their own minds!

Row A seats 21 to 24 are identified as "conductor in view." They are also reduced in price to account for it. Almost all of the rest of row A is top price. For those who are tall enough not to mind having an orchestra rail slightly in view, no problems really, if you like being that close to the stage.

Rows Q to T are fair but far from the stage at top price.

Rows U to W at top price may be tending a little more expensive too.

Row X is second price and much more worthwhile than the more expensive row in front, feels the monkey.  The view is average here, but the ambience is miserable. Still, away from the sound desk, it looks a fairish deal.

It is also worth noting that Dress Circle row P is the same price as X - your call, feels the monkey, who feels the Dress Circle view for the same money is far back but has a better rake over seats in front than the stalls do - worth considering if you have younger monkeys in the group.

Wheelchairs have spaces in the side and centre blocks in row P, replacing P 2, 3, 43 and 44. The view is acceptable. Transfer is possible to any stalls aisle seat.

Side Blocks: 
The side blocks are narrow and mostly located outside the proscenium arch. The two seats closest to the central aisles in rows A to J are fine, and from row K to P the viewing angle is sufficient to consider these seats over seats farther back in the centre block.

The ends of rows A to M are sold at restricted view prices. The end two seats in rows C to L, and the end 3 in rows A and B all drop to third price - except rows H to N on the "low numbers" side, which are at second.

You have a choice. The "high numbers" side is slightly cheaper because the restriction is a tad greater, BUT for many years both were the same price. The monkey would take "low numbers" side rows G then F first. Then it would look at "high numbers" side rows. There it would then take G to J first, then J, K then L, then M or F. The distance from the stage lessens the restriction slightly.

At that point it feels there is a choice. It could then either pay more for "low numbers" side J, K then L or go cheaper for row E on either side. After that it's personal preference whether to pay more for "low numbers" M and N or less for C to A (in that order) on both sides. The distance from the stage lessens the restriction slightly. Bear in mind the further forward you go, the less you see. Some may even want to take row ZA before rows C, B and A.

Rows R to ZA are little colonies with access ways in front. The view is distant from the stage and the seats feel isolated from the action. Take S to W only if nothing better is offered, and note that from X back they are much cheaper, and perhaps worth a thought if you can't get more central tickets for the money (take Dress Circle rows M and N before these, though).

Side block row W back is cheaper, as are extreme ends of rows S to V. The monkey would take the nearest central aisle seats in W or X first if possible.

General hazard notes

The rear stalls ceiling is low and painted dull purple making a gloomy atmosphere in the back stalls.

Row A seats 21 to 24 are identified as "conductor in view."

The ends of rows A to M have restricted views.

Row Y 17 to 22, Z 15 and 23 and ZA 11 and 23 are around the sound control desk.
 

A reader has noted that D36 and 37have a restricted view during a "Signed" performance, due to the signer standing near there. "Signed" performance dates are announced both on www.lionking.co.uk and also this page, when known.

Changes for the current production

Prices vary daily, but the monkey makes the following observations, based on the most common patterns:

Tuesday to Thursday 'off peak' performances:
Centre block seats in rows D to P, and 2 off the aisle in G to P are sold as "Premium" (G to J centre at "Super premium") prices. One way to guarantee an outstanding view, if you are happy to pay it, thinks the monkey. It would, however avoid rows N to P at that price, though - a long way back for the cash, it feels. Seats in the side block are last pick at premium prices, feels the monkey..

For those that are not, monkey advice is that those with smaller monkeys should look at C to A (in that order), and in the side blocks rows G to K non-premium off the centre aisle seats midweek.

Second price seats are limited to rows Y back, or restricted view side front stalls seats, third price are restricted view seats in rows A to G on one side of stalls, A to N on the other. The monkey would look at third price F 7 and 8, G 6 and 7 first, then H and J 6, 7; K and L 5, 6; M 4, 5, N 3, 4 before going opting for the third price front stalls on the other side of the theatre. Back rows are not bad value either - central Y first, as that's where the prices drop over rows in front. If you can go centre block, or even just off the aisle, you'll do OK here. Watch for side block rows W and X 3 to 11 and W 35 to 43 / X 36 to 44. Previously cheaper, now top price.
 
Other performances:
Centre block seats in rows B to P, plus 2 off the aisle in the side block on D, 4 behind that from E to P and 6 on Q are sold as "Premium" (central E to K at "super premium even higher) prices. One way to guarantee an outstanding view, if you are happy to pay it, thinks the monkey. It would, however avoid rows N to P, plus anything more than 2 seats off the aisles at that price, though - a long way back or to the sides for the cash, it feels.

For those less cash endowed, monkey advice is that those with smaller monkeys should look at the side block aisle seats of B and C, then A. The taller monkey may find row A acceptable.

Watch for side block rows W and X 3 to 11 and W 35 to 43 / X 36 to 44. Previously cheaper, now top price.

Second price seats are limited to the back 3 rows or restricted view side stalls seats. There are no third price row F and G seats, so take H and J 6, 7; K and L 5, 6; M 4, 5, N 3, 4 before going as central as possible in row Z. The rest are going towards over-priced, particularly anything forward of H on the "high numbers" side, it feels.

On "Peak" dates, everything in the front section of the theatre is premium at one three-figure price or another - apart from a few top price restricted view seats on the ends of rows. Two-figure priced seats are from around row U back. The monkey would avoid the last three rows, and go for the most central you can afford otherwise... or just go at an "off peak" time if possible...

Readers comments

"The 2 or 3 first rows are too close to the stage.";

"We sat on the 2nd row. Possibly might have got a better overall view from the dress circle but you certainly felt part of the show being so near" Before the conductor's podium was moved, they also felt, "Theatremonkey seating plan says A20 is not good due to the view of the conductor but seated just one seat to the side of this I could not see this as being a major problem. The head of the conductor is in view for all Row A and B seats in the centre section for some part, but it's not too bad."

"A23 and 24: 2 "day seats" £20 each. Literally behind the conductor, who is raised, so was in our sight the whole time."

"A23 and 24: I got Front Row Centre (day seats) for £25 each - Absolutely wonderful seats. Experienced the show completely differently as from Row N."

A 24, 25, 26: I felt a little sorry for the lady in A23 who did have the conductor’s head in her way. We sat in the stalls Row A seats 24, 25 and 26... The main issue with being so close is that you miss some of the “low-down” action e.g. when the characters are lying down or crouching. I also saw the stage hands 3 or 4 times which wasn’t good!! If I went again, I would sit in the centre stalls about 6 to 10 rows back."

"A28 and 29: Absolutely brilliant seats! Worth the early start as "day seats."

"A33: the view was really good, it was AMAZING!"

"B 17 and 18: I feel is too close for this particular production as you get to see all the workings close up and all the fed up tired looking faces of the cast and all the puppets which are falling apart. I'm also glad I wasn't sat further along the row towards the centre because my view would have been obstructed by the rather large head of the conductor, complete with Tina Turner hair do!!"

"D22: (Laurence T). Sit in the stalls. I cannot stress this enough. Yes, you get a better overall view in the circle and yes, there are parts of the play that take place high up but the stalls cannot be beat for the wonderful experience they offer. I have seen this play four times, twice in London and every time I have been in the stalls. There is nothing like their immersive experience, particularly the front ten rows. The best seat I had was in the stalls row D seat 15 (22 from 31st January 2017). Seats in the central row of the stalls are a must to get the best view and nearer than row C and you might have a conductors head in front of you."

"D36 and 37: I fully accepted and was aware that the tickets were restricted view because they were at the end of the row and therefore parts of the show would not be in view. However, I was not made aware that it was a signed performance and that the signer was right in my line of vision blocking off much more of the stage and significantly impacting on my enjoyment of the show. I feel that when a show is signed anyone buying these tickets should be made aware that the signer is right in your line of vision and this includes blocking out the scenes on top of Pride Rock. With that in mind the tickets are not worth anything like £42.50."

"Row E: (Messrs Colin and a Mccarthy-Burton). Our tickets were just off the aisle in the stalls centre block on row E, well what a fantastic view we had!! Lots of legroom and a perfect view". 

"F37 and 38: (Hoodlum) We got restricted seats F37 and 38 and it really wasn't too bad. You miss a bit of the action that is taking place on the extreme left of the stage but this only happens in two scenes. The opening and closing, because so many people are on stage. it is thrilling to be in the stalls because you are involved in the action. I had a singer come right next to my seat and tap it with his stick! The tickets cost about £32 - considering full price is £47.50 (then), I felt that restricted view in Lion King was not all that bad."

"F37 and 38: As first in line I got the only pair of day seats together - but extreme sides with limited view. F37+F38. But my seats were actually good :)."

"G23 and 24: "Perfect view. Close enough to see the masks, the make-up and the actors' expressions and far enough to see the whole action. The seats are not very comfortable but the legroom is acceptable."

"Row H: (Andy). recommend getting seats as close to the front as possible to really appreciate this show. We were in Row H of the stalls which was perfect."

"H12 and 13: were fine."

"H22: "London Musical Theatre Orchestra presents A Christmas Carol" (December 2017). £81. Excellent centre seat with good leg room (I'm 6ft / 1.8m tall). I had a perfect view of the stage for the first half of the show. In the second half, someone the same height as me sat in front and I found it difficult to see the back of the stage at times but otherwise fine (it did however make me feel even more sorry for the shorter gentleman sat behind me). Wouldn't normally pay this much but I was treating my mum for her birthday."

"J16 and 17: Excellent seats. Great legroom, superb view and you are next to the aisle in the centre block which means the animals parade past you at various points in the performance. Once again Theatremonkey's green seat recommendation is spot on. There really is only one place to see this show and that is from the stalls."

"M32: I had a left hand block aisle seat in the stalls. The view was reasonable, but if I went a second time I would sit in the middle block and a little further forward as, at times, the actors appeared somewhat distant. I must also say that my seat was one of the most uncomfortable I have sat in, in any theatre. I’m only 5’8’’ tall and average build, but I just couldn’t stop fidgeting to find a comfortable position."

"P30 and 31: Great view, rake acceptable, seats fairly comfy."

Row Q: "We sat in the middle of Row Q which I would definitely recommend."

"Q27: I must say the view was superb. Not too far back and not too close to the stage. The legroom wasn't too bad either (considering I'm 5 foot 10)."

"Row S 11, 12, 13 and 14: They're on the aisle in the rear block slightly to the right of centre and we paid about £65 each. Absolutely fine seats and would have no hesitation booking them again. My youngest sat on the aisle and had a clear view and the added bonus of the animals walking by. One of the hyenas tried to take off her shoe but she put up a good fight! I did notice that, if we had been any further back, we wouldn't have been able to see the top of the stage so I think row S is about as far back as I would want to be." ;

"W37: The seat is a bit far back, but with a view of the whole stage and any activity taking place off stage in stalls area. The rake is not pronounced, so tall people in front would be a problem, especially for children."

Stalls Boxes

Layout

One either side of the stage. These have a side view, which one reader is keen on, preferring them to Dress Circle boxes. They are actually above the stalls, not at the same level.

Legroom

Unlimited, as the seating is on chairs, which can be moved around. A reader notes that it is actually more cramped now an extra 2 chairs (4 in total) have been squeezed in, and you may have to move them near to the front wall to see properly.

Choosing seats in general

Reader comments say it all...

General hazard notes

You miss the side of the stage nearest to you. SPOILER ALERT: Your box may be shared by characters, so you may be "on display"...

Changes for the current production

None.

Readers comments

"Box E: (Damian Riverol). I had 2 tickets for box C and it was one of the best seats ever. I had booked a box for a surprise for a friend and didn't want him to know until we got to the box, the staff were brilliant and didn't let on until we got to the box.

The box is above the stalls and is really close to the front, it is slightly restricted view but you only miss about a minute of the action the whole show so it is worth the discounted price. As you are able to move the chairs and lean on the side you can move about and see everything else.

SPOILER: We were particularly excited when one of the cast members joined us for the beginning of act 2 and she was very nice - saying 'hi' before the song started. SPOILER ENDS.

I would recommend anyone to go for these seats if you are looking for cheaper seats but want a brilliant view. There are only 2 seats per box though. You could see a little of what was going on offstage right but as myself and my friend work in theatre this added to the excitement."

"Box E: Just wanted to provide an update as I feel that the current info on the website is a little mis-leading. A lot of the acting happens on the right side of the stage so you miss quite a bit in Box C, certainly far more than the minute indicated in Damian Riverol’s advice. I would definitely recommend Box D over this one for this reason. Boxes also now contain four seats which makes it a little more cramped and the ‘unlimited’ legroom is actually quite limited as you have to sit right by the railing to see much. I would not recommend them for older people as the viewing angle and space make it a bit uncomfortable. One nice touch is that you get to use the Ambassador Lounge which is lovely with free nibbles and a glass of prosecco on arrival. Overall I would still say they’re reasonable value with the lounge use included but I probably would have paid a bit more to sit at a better angle had I known how restricted the view was."

"Box K: I took my grandson (he's a very small 8) - buying the two seats in box D of the Stalls (restricted view). I must say that I consider these ideal if you have a small child with you.
The left hand side of the stage is cut off a little true - but my grandson was able to stand, and his view was very good and the box is very near the stage for a little one - and no 'tutting' off people sitting by you as there are only the two of you in the box. The chairs were a little old-but that was bearable! SPOILER: A member of the cast joins you for 5 minutes at the start of the second half-very exciting for a little one! All in all-100% recommended with a small child."

"Box K: I didn't tell my partner we had box seats so was very exciting being led down a secret corridor to our own room. The left hand side is a bit obscured, but you are pretty close to the front. You can move the chairs around and lean on the edge of the box so you don't really miss anything. Great seats if, like me, you tend to fidget having to sit still for so long, and of course no problems with legroom! You feel a bit like royalty in there, and can talk quietly between yourselves during the production without disturbing anyone. If you don't like crowds or chattering kids its ideal. SPOILER: A minor dancer joins you in the first song of the second act, but in box K (I think) you are joined by a singer in the very first song. I'd really recommend a box for romantic couples or for parents with kids. It felt more like a private performance just for us. Good value!"

"Box K: (Futurenat). We saw this show last night (20 June 2015) (. I had booked Box D which is a 4-person box and would note that the view is very restricted indeed from the front of the box. Sitting back in the seat while seeing any action on stage at all is near impossible and you will have to lean right forward to see anything except the very front of the stage.

I agree that it is great to be so close to the action but would recommend if you want a box to perhaps go for the ones on the other side of the theatre as there is a lot of action on stage left as you look at the stage which those at the front of the box will miss.s.

Having said that it was a nice touch to be escorted to the box by a staff member and exciting having an actor come in to the box at the start of the second half.

The box gives an impressive view over the audience as this is one of the larger theatres, and as other reviewers note there is a spectacle in the stalls aisles that is nicely visible from this box."

Dress Circle

Layout

Called the ROYAL CIRCLE in this theatre.

The Upper Circle overhangs this circle at row C. The circle overhang means that you don't see the very top of the proscenium arch from row L back, something noticeable particularly from row P. You do see the entire stage, and everything happening on it, but fans of theatre architecture may wish to sit further forward.

A centre aisle splits seating into left and right blocks. Row AA is tucked into the corners of the circle outside the main seating section.

Blocks are steeply raked on steps.

The rake is very steep in this circle making the back row seem a long way from the stage. Since the circle itself is towards the rear of the theatre it feels a long way from the stage even in the front row. Theatremonkey prefers the stalls for the same cost, one reader notes that he prefers the view from the front Dress Circle to that in the same priced stalls

Legroom

A bit cramped in row A, acceptable for most in other seats, though choose the stalls if over five foot eight tall. Opinions vary on degree - one reader felt that row K was cramped, for example, though another in row L found it comfortable even for someone 6ft 2 tall. 

Choosing seats in general

There are clear views and fair value back to row H.

At second price rows M and N behind are just about fairly priced. Probably for the shorter they represent a better deal than rear stalls at the same price, as views are less affected by the height of folk in front.

Some feel that rows M to P feel a long way from the stage. SPOILER: perhaps choose rear stalls over these for cast interaction reasons alone. SPOILER ENDS.

The first and last two seats in each row, should be avoided or considered last for being on the sides of the block - small children in particular could miss parts of the show from the very endmost seats. The same notes as for the centre block apply about the best rows.

Where rows J to L are top price, try for the most central seats available, or consider M behind them at the lower price to save a few pounds for a similar view.

Row AA, tucked between the edge of circle and boxes, gives a box like side view of the action. Seats closest to the circle have the better view, closest to the boxes an inch more leg space. Acceptable for the less fussy at "day seat" prices.

General hazard notes

The overhang causes those in row P to miss action at the top of the stage.

The centre and side aisles have metal bars at the end, affecting the view slightly in row A, seats 5, 25, 26 and 46. The steep rake mean these are not so much of a problem in the equivalent seats of row B.

Rails and lighting equipment on the front of the circle affect views from row A, particularly for shorter visitors.

Changes for the current production

Prices vary daily, but the monkey makes the following observations, based on the most common patterns:

Tuesday to Thursday 'off peak' performances:
Central rows B to D are "premium" (B and C "super premium") priced. A way to guarantee a good view, feels the monkey. "Premium" seats also spread out as far as 13 and 38.

Second price seats are confined to the back two rows and outer ends of L and M. You won't miss anything, and the monkey would take them over rows in front for the same view at less cash, just not the outermost seats.

At other times:
Row A 11 to 27 are "lower peak" priced. Be aware you have to look over the circle front. If taller and wanting a front view, OK, but not worth paying out if you have children or want a relaxed view, feels the monkey.

It notes that otherwise, younger children will probably find the stepped view better than the same price stalls if somebody tall is in front of them, but that there is slightly more interaction with the stage in the downstairs seating. If you don't fancy the price, take a look at the 2 aisle seats in each row from F back (avoids the aisle rails in view), just behind the "premium" stuff. Similar view, less cash.

Central rows B to F are often "premium" (B to D "super premium") priced. A way to guarantee a good view, feels the monkey. Take F last, though, as they are a fair way back for the money. "Premium" seats spread over the centre aisle to more than 10 seats off the aisle rows B to F. Skip them if they go more than that, feels the monkey, just not value, it thinks. Be aware that row A can be "lower peak" priced. More than the row behind - but you have to look over the circle front. If taller and wanting a front view, OK, but not worth paying out if you have children or want a relaxed view, feels the monkey.

Again, younger children will probably elsewhere in the circle find the stepped view better than the same price stalls if somebody tall is in front of them, but that there is slightly more interaction with the stage in the downstairs seating. At non-premium prices, try for central G. Second price seats are confined to the back two rows if they exist. You won't miss anything, and the monkey would take row P before M and N for the same view at a lower price, avoiding M back totally when at top price.

On "Peak Dates" everything forward of row J hits premium prices. Go as central as you can afford, feels the monkey, in whichever price you choose. If going for the only non-premium price stuff, same applies, and skip M back - or pick an "off peak" date of course...

Readers comments

NOTE THAT NUMBERING HAS BEEN ADJUSTED FOLLOWING CHANGES IN OCTOBER 2018. THE MONKEY HAS DECIDED TO REMOVE "SEAT NUMBER SPECIFIC" COMMENTS, AS CHANGES MAKE THEM IRRELEVANT TO THE NEW LAYOUT. GUESTS ARE WELCOME TO SEND NEW INFORMATION TO THE USUAL ADDRESS.

"Row A: (Michelle) We paid top price for 4 front row (A) Dress Circle seats in the centre for ourselves and our two children. As you state, there is a bar running along the edge here which does slightly restrict the view if sat right back in your seat, but what we found worse was the light gantry which protrudes from the font centre of the dress circle. This comes out so far that short people (like me) and my two children had to sit forward in our seats all the way through (to constant tutting from people behind!) so that we could see the performance otherwise our view of the entire front part of the stage was totally masked. Very disappointing."

"A: (Laurence T). I'm 6' and as long as I sat up straight the light gantry didn't affect my view. My girlfriend (5'2) used a booster cushion so she could also see the entirety of the stage, but very small children should avoid these seats. (Also in central seats the light gantry sticks out slightly more it seems, just a warning) As the sound is bad in the Lyceum I'd go for seats in the stalls usually. The circle is so far back you feel removed from the action but in terms of appreciating the spectacle the circle is great, but too far away to warrant top price in my opinion. Try checking seats close to the performance dates on ATG and you may notice premium seats going down in the stalls if they're not getting close to selling out. (Around Christmas this won't happen though)."

"B centre: the view was extremely good and could see everything clearly. The people in the first row of the Dress Circle may have a problem seeing due to something sticking out the front of the circle."

"Row C: (Richard Sellens) my view was great and at one point I also had a cast member singing near me!!!"

"D centre: (Paul) recommended by the nice Ticketmaster lady when I booked the seats months ago, and very well recommended seats too. Plenty of leg room (I’m 5ft11) and bag room round the feet – even enough room for my wife who is expecting our second child in May(!). I would have booked an aisle seat had I known then what I know now!! The rake is steep enough that we missed the mess of the lighting gantry that spoils the Row A view and steep enough that my boy could see everything over the heads of those in front."

"Row F: I had a perfect view from the centre of row F. Worth paying top price for". 

"Row F: (Pam Coombs) Our seats were perfect in the centre."

"Row F: Great view!"

"Row H four seats off the side aisle: We found them excellent, the view of the stage is totally clear with no obstruction from the Upper Circle overhang. The rake is steep enough to give a generally unobstructed view (although the man in front of me seemed extremely tall) - my wife and daughter had no problems at all. Legroom was very good for my height."

"Row L: The seats in row L are comfortable and there is sufficient leg room for even me at 6' 2" but we were so far from the stage we couldn't see faces or expressions and the public involvement with the action is only for those in the stalls so you feel deprived in the circle. When you are quite close in the stalls you can make yourself look at the characters heads and believe in them. From the back of the circle you are mainly aware of the actor working the character which is not the same."

"Row M centre. I took the advice of the Monkey's seating plan and once again it didn't let me down! When we got there it seemed that the overhang might be an issue with regards of what we were able to see but I was wrong! They were perfect. In fact, I think it is better to be sat a little way back then you see less of the actors in the costumes. All you see is the animals!"

"Row P: they say it is restricted view as during "Can You Feel..." you miss about a minute of the ariel ballet because of the overhang of the other circle above it. I think they are a bit of a bargain, though, as the main actors etc are on stage during this minute anyway. Children will see the ballet from here - it is just taller people will miss out".

Dress Circle Boxes

Layout

Two either side of the theatre, between stage and circle. They were originally not sold, then just two seats of a possible six were placed on sale at restricted view price.

Legroom

Unlimited, as the seating is on chairs, which can be moved around.

Choosing seats in general

On the plus side, you pay for what you get - a view of about two thirds of the stage, for two thirds of the price.

On the negative side, well, they had a good reason for not selling these seats before, so why are they doing it now? Ask this before buying. The monkey likes the legroom, but is not keen on the view. A reader feels that if you want a box, C and D in the stalls are a better bet.

A, B, F and G are a possible discount choice over other restricted view seats in the Upper Circle or full view seats in the Grand Circle. For those willing to share the box with actors...and lose a little view, the monkey thinks the seats may build a cult following at the new price.

General hazard notes

You miss the side of the stage nearest to you. SPOILER ALERT: Your box may be shared by characters, so you may be "on display"...

Changes for the current production

None.

Readers comments

None.

Upper Circle

Layout

Called the Grand Circle in this theatre.

This circle is very high above the ground and steeply raked enough to induce vertigo in many people. Normally, this is as they make their way down to their seats and most find that, once seated, they become used to the height.

As in the Stalls and Dress Circle, aisles split these seats into a central and two side blocks.

Legroom

Tending to poor in all seats, worst in row A. Those over five foot tall should consider end of row seats on the centre aisle which should provide some respite for one leg anyway.

Standing space is behind a fairly high wall with a bar on top, so is not suitable for children or those under 5ft 6 or so.

Choosing seats in general

Centre Block: 
This offers clear views and fair value back to row G. With almost all seats a single price in those rows, monkey advice is to take those furthest forward and most central first - remembering that A has less legroom. If taller, then B before A, really tall... aisle seats are the safest bet with space for one leg to stretch at least.

A reader notes that if those in the front row lean forward, you will be forced to do so too in order to see the whole stage.

From row H back the rake angle is noticeably steep and it feels a long way down and also far from the stage. Value for money is still fair - better now row H is cheaper.

Rear rows are very well priced if vertigo isn't a problem.

Side Blocks: 
These as usual offer a clear view from all except the first and last four seats in each row, which should be avoided. If paying full price, opt for the centre block as you will get better views for the same cash. The same notes as for the centre block apply about the best rows.

Row A 1, 47, row B 1, 2, 48, 49 and row C 1, 49 are felt by one reader to have a "sideways" view of the stage.

Rear rows again are reasonably priced for those on a budget, but a head for heights is advisable.

General hazard notes

A metal bar runs across the front of this circle affecting the view slightly in row A. 

Changes for the current production

Prices vary daily, but the monkey makes the following observations, based on the most common patterns:

Tuesday to Thursday 'off peak' performances:
centre block A to H are third price, so skip H, and take J behind it, as J is cheaper for the same views, or save even more by choosing L instead, cheaper still.

At other 'off peak' performances:
Rows B to E are second price, A, plus F to J are third price, K to M are fourth. So, take F and L over E and J respectively. Same views, cheaper... Oh, and the "restricted view" aisle seats are now the cheapest in the place - well worth a thought before K to M, feels the monkey, to be closer to the stage for less cash.

Peak performances:
All rows to E are second price, F to L third and just M at fourth. So, take F before E, also M before K and L. Same views, cheaper... Again, the "restricted view" aisle seats are now the cheapest in the place - well worth a thought before F back, feels the monkey, to be closer to the stage for less cash.

Basically, follow the rule at all times of taking the seats one row behind the more expensive ones, is the simple summary.

Readers comments

"Row A 33 and 34: (Roxanne). These are marked as partially restricted view (lowest price) because they have a rail in front of them. We just leaned on the (dirty) rail , and the view was perfect, though high up. Not worth it to buy any other seats in the same level at a more expensive price because we had the same view as everyone else. From reading the reviews, it seems as though the viewers who sat in the stalls had a better impression of the play than I did at the top. From up there, we could see layers of dirt and dust on all the wall stucco ornaments and the whole thing looked very shabby. The velvet on the rail was torn to pieces."

"Row A: I could see the stage easily but I could see rather too much in that the effects were ruined by the fact that you could see how they were created. Given that I was at the front of the Upper Circle, I thought this was appalling. 

You could see the rollers the buffalos were on more clearly than the buffalos themselves. During the river scene, the fish were not visible but the people holding the cutouts and the lights very definitely were. And  the pad onto which the character jumped obvious for the whole piece.

I would certainly recommend not to go to Upper Circle. Seats may be cheaper but they are still a lot of money and these 'errors' reduced my enjoyment considerably."

"Row L seats 28 and 29: I think the price is very very good for these seats, especially as they're in the middle and you can see everything. Although in the stalls you get the cast walking right by you so you feel more included. But as I'm not the biggest fan, I think these are the best seats as the view hardly changes in the grand circle where ever you sit and they're the cheapest. The leg room is good, but be a bit careful if you're 5ft 7 and above, because it can be a little uncomfortable."

"Row M seats 36 to 39: the view was fine."

"Standing: WHAT A BARGAIN!! I stood in 'position 17' at the back of the Upper Circle and had a marvellous view of the stage. 

After bribing a small boy with a pound to use his binoculars I was able to stand back and watch the fantastic big set pieces that make this show so good unfold before my natural view, and when solo songs and speaky bits happened I could zoom in and look at the faces in detail. The only draw back from the standing tickets are that you are not close to all the stalls action that happens but you still see it all and you have to join in the applause simply for the arrival of the animals. 

One problem is that it is inevitable that when standing you may be next to annoying Japanese girls who don't understand ' no photos' and talk to one another a lot. Be firm with them and, if they don't shut up, make the ushers do some work. Also, due to the cheap (well cheaper) seats being at the back....school groups are inevitable. This cannot be helped so there is nowt you can do."

"Standing: Went to Box Office at 3pm (June 2015) and got a standing ticket for £15, bang in the centre, number 15. I think there must be 30 in total and they all offer an excellent view. There is a short thick wooden wall to lean on and separates you from the people sitting in front, who are so low that you have a completely clear view top to bottom of the stage, even of the conductor too. The floor is carpeted and so with a sit down in the interval I had no problems standing 7.30-10pm. Obviously it is hard to make out the expressions on the actors' faces but I had some opera glasses and it didn't seem to be a particularly worse view than anywhere in the grand circle. I might even prefer the view standing here to sitting at the back of the dress circle. NB On a separate occasion, box office told me that the standing tickets were always £25. Clearly they don't know what they're doing.

Notes best seat advice

Total 2173 seats approx.

Air-conditioned auditorium.

This theatre takes incredible care to make the show accessible to everybody. All the information a disabled visitor could need is available at: thelionking.co.uk/london/access/ - in much more detail than the monkey can provide. A brief summary, though, is: Sennheiser Infrared and induction loop; signed and audio described performances occasionally. Large print and Braille programmes available. Braille script also available for reading at the theatre (contact the House Manager for details). Guide dogs can be dog sat, bowls of water are offered to them too. Wheelchair access is down a slope from a fire exit, not ideal but at least users get good seats in the auditorium on row P. Two disabled toilets available - gender segregated adapted toilets - ALMOST UNIQUE IN LONDON!!! Other theatres take note. This theatre gets it right.

Overall this is good going for the West End. For fuller details and to arrange facilities contact 0800 912 6972. These numbers are NOT available for general bookings.

No food except Ice cream and confectionery.

Four bars; one in the Stalls, Two in the Dress Circle and one on the Upper Circle level.

Two V.I.P. suites - the "White room" and "Red room" are also available for hire.

Toilets at Stalls, Dress Circle and Upper Circle level.

General price band information

Theatres use "dynamic pricing." Seat prices change according to demand for a particular performance. Prices below were compiled as booking originally opened. Current prices are advised at time of enquiry.

Based on paying FULL PRICE (no discount!) for tickets, site writers and contributing guests have ALSO created the colour-coded plans for "value for money," considering factors like views, comfort and value-for-money compared with other same-priced seats available.

For a full discussion, opinions, reviews, notes, tips, hints and advice on all the seats in this theatre, click on "BEST SEAT ADVICE" (on the left of your screen).

On the plans below:
Seats in GREEN many feel may offer either noticeable value, or something to compensate for a problem; for example, being a well-priced restricted view ticket. Any seats coloured LIGHT GREEN are sold at "premium" prices because the show producer thinks they are the best. The monkey says "you are only getting what you pay for" but uses this colour to highlight the ones it feels best at the price, and help everybody else find equally good seats nearby at lower prices.

Seats in WHITE, many feel, provided about what they pay for. Generally unremarkable.

Seats in RED are coloured to draw attention. Not necessarily to be avoided - maybe nothing specific is wrong with them, other than opinions that there are better seats at the same price. Other times there may be something to consider before buying – perhaps overpricing, obstructed views, less comfort etc.

Please remember that cheaper seats often do not offer the same view / location quality as top price ones, and that ticket prices are designed to reflect this difference.

This theatre uses "Dynamic Pricing" more than most. Opinions and prices are thus based on patterns most frequently observed for the performance dates stated. Everything will vary by both performance date and dependent on demand for tickets at the time, means that pricing changes too rapidly to confirm anything except at time of purchase.

By value for money:

Patterns include:
Tuesday to Thursday (except "peak weeks")

Lyceum Theatre week day value seating plan

 
 
Friday and Sunday (except "peak weeks")

Lyceum Theatre Friday and Sunday value seating plan

 
 
Saturday (except "peak weeks")

Lyceum Theatre Saturday value seating plan

 
"Peak Weeks"

Lyceum Theatre peak date value seating plan

By price:

Patterns include:
Tuesday to Thursday (except "peak weeks")
 
 

Lyceum Theatre week day price seating plan

 
Friday and Sunday (except "peak weeks")
 

Lyceum Theatre Friday and Sunday price seating plan

 
Saturday (except "peak weeks")

Lyceum Theatre Saturday price seating plan

 
"Peak Weeks"

Lyceum Theatre peak date price seating plan

 

 

Notes

Though the monkey rates them highly, those unwilling to look sharply upwards at the stage - and have a bar in view for the shortest customers should avoid Stalls row A. A 21 to 24 also have the orchestra conductor in view. A reader also warns that row A of the Dress Circle may be unsuitable for children or those shorter than around 5ft 7.


The Dress Circle is called the "ROYAL CIRCLE" in this theatre

The Upper Circle is called the "GRAND CIRCLE" in this theatre

Please note: The seating plans are not accurate representations of the auditorium. While we try to ensure they are as close to the actual theatre plan as possible we cannot guarantee they are a true representation. Customers with specific requirements are advised to discuss these with the theatre prior to booking to avoid any confusion.

-0.1221759, 51.5115961

Nearest underground station

Covent Garden - Piccadilly Line (dark blue).

For mobility impaired audience members, the Society of London Theatre provide a "photo map" - illustrated walking route to this venue from a near landmark and also Waterloo Station (the nearest fully accessible station) on their website https://officiallondontheatre.com/, via the theatre's listing page on that site.

On leaving the station, turn right and walk into the large pedestrian plaza that is Covent Garden. If you see a long road with cars in front of you, wrong way.

On entering the plaza space, turn to your left and walk along the collonaded area. If you see Tesco Metro Supermarket or a bank, Wrong way.

Keep walking ahead as far as the collonaded area will allow (it forms the outer part of the market Square). Follow it to the right or cut across it if it isn't raining. At the end of the building is Russell Street.

Walk along Russell Street, to the first crossroads. Take the street to the right, Wellington Street and walk down it. If you reach a street corner with the Drury Lane theatre ahead of you, or see no theatres at all (really!) wrong way. 

Keep walking downhill, crossing Tavistock Street. The Lyceum Theatre is the collonaded building ahead of you on the right side of the road, beyond the "Old Orleans" restaurant.
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Also useful to know is that also close to the theatre is Temple Station - Circle Line (yellow) and District Line (green). This is closed on Sundays and some other times, so check before using. 

Plan your tube journey to this station using the link below:
Get here with Journey Planner 

If it is open, then leave the station turning left. If you see the river, wrong way!

Go up the steps and cross the road ahead of you. Keep walking straight on up Arundel Street (the road sloping upwards ahead of you).  Make sure you are on the left hand side pavement.

At the top of Arundel Street is "The Strand" and The Aldwych", a busy road intersection and cluster of buildings. You should not cross the road. Just turn to your left and walk down the Strand. 

Keep going until you come to another busy junction at the end of the buildings. Look to your right and the Lyceum Theatre is on the corner across some busy roads. Use the pedestrian crossings to get to it!

Buses

6, 11, 13, 15, all stop on the Aldwych. Walk towards the Strand Theatre and cross the street next to it, walk on and the Lyceum is ahead of you on the right. If you pass the Duchess Theatre, wrong way. 

Taxi

A rank for Black taxis is at Charing Cross Station - a long distance from the theatre. Best chance of hailing one in the street is to walk down Russell Street on to the Strand.

Car park

Parker Street, under the New London Theatre.

Exit the Car Park and stand with your back to the main foyer of the theatre. Cross the road ahead of you and turn to your right. The street corner is there ahead of you. If not, wrong way. At the corner of the street, Turn left into Drury Lane and walk along it. If you pass the New London Theatre, wrong way.

Walk straight on, crossing Great Queen Street. Continue down Drury Lane. Please cross to the other side of the street and continue, crossing over Broad Court and Martlett Court until you come to a four way crossroads.

Turn to your right at these crossroads. Do not cross any street. Just walk ahead down Russell Street. Cross Crown Court and continue straight on, past the Fortune Theatre. Just past this theatre, change to the other side of the road, to the same side as the Drury Lane Theatre. Cross Catherine Street, the one in front of the Drury Lane Theatre. Do not walk down it. 

Walk on to the next corner and turn to your left to walk down Wellington Street. If you come to Covent Garden Piazza, too far.

Keep walking downhill, crossing Tavistock Street. The Lyceum Theatre is the collonaded building ahead of you on the right side of the road.

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