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Dorfman Theatre, the National Theatre


Lambeth, London SE1 9PX 020 7452 3000

  • Where to buy tickets
  • Best seat advice
  • Seating plan/s
  • Getting to the theatre

Buying tickets online

www.nationaltheatre.org.uk the venue's own website provide the service.
This venue allows individual seat selection for most productions. You can also view the auditorium via photographs taken from various positions within it.

Booking fees per transaction:
There is no fee for online bookings, except for a £1 charge levied per booking to cover postage. Avoid it by booking in person, collecting your tickets on the day, or enclosing your own stamped, self addressed envelope with a postal booking as no fees are charged with those methods. Reader CC notes that the Box Office don't mind this last, though points out that you don't get the smart envelope, nice bit of cardboard and pretty leaflets with tickets, well worth the extra few pence, if you send your own. All cheaper than the £3 fee per booking, not per ticket, fee made for phone bookings - to which the optional £1 postage fee also applies.

Other Online Choices (with genuine S.T.A.R ticket agencies): 
Independent S.T.A.R. ticket agencies may also offer an alternative choice of seats for some events, with booking fees differing from those charged by the theatre box office itself. They may have seats available or special offers when theatres do not.

Ticket agency prices vary in response to theatres implementing “dynamic pricing”  - which alters prices according to demand for a particular performance. Current prices are advised at time of enquiry.

Box office information

Telephone: 020 7452 3000
Operated by venue itself.

A £2.50 fee per booking, not per ticket, fee is charged for phone bookings. An optional £1 charge is also levied per booking to cover postage. This is more expensive than booking online, where only the optional £1 postage charge applies. 

For personal callers or by post:
Olivier Theatre, Royal National Theatre, South Bank, SE1 9PXX
No booking fee for personal callers.

By post, the optional £1 per booking, not per ticket, postage charge applies, unless you are enclosing your own stamped, self addressed envelope. Reader CC notes that the Box Office don't mind this, though points out that you don't get the smart envelope, nice bit of cardboard and pretty leaflets with tickets, well worth the extra few pence, if you send your own.

A reader notes about "Day Seats" in person at the box office:
"I got to the box office about 9:30am and there was already a pretty longish queue outside (they don't let you move inside and start selling until 10, not great if it's raining). The queue took about 45 minutes so I'd suggest you take a book/ipod for the wait. The seats for the evening performance were all taken by then but there were still plenty of standing seats available. I was still able to get a seat for that day as there was a matinee performance with seats spare (Matinees are generally easier to get tickets for)."

Special Access Needs Customers: 
Wheelchair users and other registered disabled theatregoers can book their seats and enquire about concessionary prices that may be available to them on 020 7452 3000.

www.nationaltheatre.org.uk is the official theatre website.

Please remember that cheaper seats often do not offer the same view / location quality as top price ones, and that ticket prices are designed to reflect this difference.

A simple black rectangular room. Seats are at ground level, with more at Dress and Upper Circle level. Ground level seats are arranged to suit each different production. All ground level seats are sometimes removed for promenade performances (when the audiences stand and follow the actors about the floor like sheep). A first time visitor feels it is, "A lovely theatre. It felt quite intimate, in a good way."

  • Stalls
  • Dress Circle
  • Upper Circle

Stalls

Layout

Called Pit Level in this theatre.

When used, it has 11 rows facing the stage, with 2 further rows behind and 2 down the sides.

In "shallow configuration" seats are on very shallow tiered steps back to row K. Row L is behind a rail on another step. Row M is behind another rail, and are stool type seats raised on a high plinth, with foot rests that fold out.

Rows B to K are well-offset to see around seats in front, B 1 and 15 seem to have a bigger gap to look through than the others.

Seats A, C, E, G and J 1 and B, D, F, H and K 15 are not the same as other seats. They are narrower, small square padded leather seats - like those you'd expect in a "kitchen breakfast bar" setting at a posh furniture shop. Worse, they involve a little "D.I.Y" to operate. On arrival, ask the person in seats 2 and 14 to move their coat. Then disappoint the person behind (who expected a clear view with nobody in front) by pulling the top of the seat (with the row letter on it) towards the aisle, through 90 degrees, to make it flat. Then lift the flap to form the backrest, and be seated.

Row L at the sides has a "rollercoaster" style safety rail sticking out at midriff level when seated.

In "steep configuration" rows A to K rise steeply up to circle level, improving sightlines no end for those in the centre block.

Seats do not have arm-rests.

Legroom

Row A has unlimited legroom.

Acceptable for those up to 5ft 11 or so in rows B to K.

D, F, H and K 1 and E, D and J 15 have more legroom where the folding seat in front is off-set.

Row L is suitable for those up to around 5ft 8 or so.

Row M high chairs may suit those up to around 6ft, but those under 5ft may find them a climb.

Choosing seats in general

This is trickier than the monkey expected. In "end stage" view, the rake (tiering on steps between seats) in the centre block isn't as steep as it would have liked in "shallow configuration" mode. Tall folk in front could spell trouble. Hence it would go for rows A to D in that order, if under 5ft 7 or so.

It would take folding seats A, C, E, G and J 1 and B, D, F, H and K 15 last if "broader in the beam" or not particularly adept or strong at folding furniture as frankly they really are smaller, less comfortable and a faff in general, it feels.

Row L seems too far back and behind a rail to justify the top price. Going a single row back, the seats are higher and cheaper, just a bit better value, the monkey feels. Worth watching for the metal pillars at the end of this row too. Not in sightlines to the stage, but just "there" for purists. For row M seats facing the stage, the pillars may cut the edge off, but nothing that a little leaning to the side won't cure (won't worry those next to you either, feeels the monkey).

At the sides, the monkey would probably take M 1 to 5 and 61 to 65 or N 1 to 4 and 51 to 58 first. They are almost "on the stage," but at least you don't have to turn your head sideways to view - even if you risk set items blocking the rear corner of the stage. The elevated row N may in fact give a slightly better angle. It will test that over future productions. M57, "slightly restricted view" second price was a total bargain for "The Red Lion," an "end stage" show, the monkey felt. Couldn't see the side wall nearest it, without leaning backwards, but otherwise, as close as anyone in the fourth row to the action, for half the cash.

In "high stalls" configuration, the sides from 6 seats along won't see, as they are level with centre block row E - they are not sold for this reason.

Further along the sides, away from the stage, do expect to look sideways. Anyone leaning forward will block your view. On the plus side, these are better than any seat at the same price in the circle above, as you won't lose the edges of the stage if everybody behaves themselves as they should. Again, row N may help in this regard, height aiding seeing over the row in front.

General hazard notes

The folding seats A, C, E, G and J 1 and B, D, F, H and K 15.

The shallow steps in the centre block, in "shallow configuration" layout.

Anyone leaning forward in the side galleries.

High seats may be difficult for the shorter or infirm.

Changes for the current production

Death of England: Centre pit seats are low-backed bar stools, not reserved. Action takes place around them, so you will have to leave ALL bags and coats in the cloakroom. Monkey advice is take the absolute minimum and be prepared to queue both to deposit / retrieve coats and also for a decent seat.
 
Around the edge of the pit, row L is top price - monkey would go a row behind for the same view, cheaper and with more legroom on the high stools of row M. If wanting row L, ends furthest from the door - rows SLL, SLM, SLR, SMR are same price as M but further along. Row X is good value as "high chair" seats. Even cheaper restricted view ends of this row are worth it too.

All of Us: Stage in the centre, seats on two sides. The rake (steps between seats) is good, and premium stuff in G, H, J, EE and FF is equal to the cheaper rows in front and behind. Row KK at second price is good value – the end seat usually has nothing in front. Be aware that rows CC to JJ may have extra seats added so that the aisle seat isn’t any longer – the monkey has been caught like that before.

Sea Sick: Stage in the centre. The rake (steps between seats) is good, and E to K all offer a decent view – take them over circle N and P for the same cash.

Hamlet: Stage in the centre, seats on two sides. The rake (steps between seats) is good, and as all seats are a single price just take the ones you like – closest to the front. Take anything here before circle seats for the same money, as the view is closer.  Be aware that rows CC to JJ may have extra seats added so that the aisle seat isn’t any longer – the monkey has been caught like that before.

Readers comments

"Seats on the stage: "Love" (December 2016). Heads up for those people who have booked seats at the front of the stage (not so much on the sides of the stage) ..... You will very much be part of the action. The chairs are all freestanding and the actors weave in and out, so maybe not the best choice if you don't like that sort of thing."

"Seats on the stage: "Love" (December 2016). We got restricted view tickets " on stage" in front row --- excellent position for all the action."

"Row A 12 and 13: "When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other" (February 2019). I can report that these are restricted view (and this restricted view applies to the whole of Row A, and probably extends back maybe 6 rows). They are restricted view because some of the action takes place in a car on the stage, and the seats are too low (below stage level) for punters to actually see into the car!"

"Rows A to C: "The Flick" (May 2016). From what I could see, the first 3 rows in the Pit are on the same level for this production (i.e. no rake for rows B and C). I'm not sure why this is - maybe the stage is slightly further forward than normal for an "end stage" configuration. 
The set is as expected. The "fourth wall" is where the cinema screen would be, so the audience are looking into the cinema auditorium from "behind the screen". The cast perform standing or seated in a variety of the cinema seats on the set. At a few points, there is activity in the projection room of the cinema (two small windows high in the rear wall of the set enable the audience to see this). I think you'll be fine in row A other than possibly having to look up at some points during the production."

"B8: "The Pacifists Guide to War on Cancer" (November 2016) - B8 - £20 Friday rush - Bargain. Perfect clear view."

"C 28 and 29: "Rules for Living" (May 2015). Not the most comfortable night I have ever had in the theatre, being a wide person, the seats are awfully narrow, and reasonably tall, 5' 7", the seat height was awkward. I could not quite reach the floor, but to try and perch my feet on the shelf the seats were fixed to, was a little too uncomfortable. Judging by the fidgeting going on around me, everyone else was having the same trouble. The 2 rows in front, and the one behind seemed fine though. The sight lines are not good either, some things were missed completely, but the sound was good, so we heard everything."

"D1 and E1: 'Husbands and Sons' (October 2015). My seat cost £20 and was 'On Stage' - D1 for the first half, then switched to the opposite side, E1, after the interval. What stunning seats!! and you're literally on the edge of the action. This play is performed 'in the round' and I don't believe there would be a bad view anywhere in the theatre. Even sitting literally on the edge of the stage, there was plenty of legroom. Seats are reasonably narrow, flip down seats with no arm rest, but perfectly comfortable. I sat on the end of the row where actors were entering and exiting. You're asked to leave coats and bags in the cloakroom, which is understandable in view of the proximity to the stage. Sitting in seat E1 for the first half, I was really cold!! Not sure if they had the aircon cranked up, or if it was the end of the row with a void underneath and behind the seat. Worth a mention, especially as you're asked not to take coats in. The queue for the cloakroom afterwards was fine. They had four members of staff on, so the turnaround was really fast. Absolute billy bargain."

"G14: "Love" (December 2016). Lots of legroom, good rake .... No armrests though so you are a bit packed together."

"Row H: "Love (December 2016). A reader notes that, "row H low numbers (stage left) for Love at National fairly restricted view, a part of the set extends under the balcony."

"J1: "Beginning" (October 2017). Logged on at 10am and bagged this seat for £15. It's a flip seat with a seat back though but no arms. I found it alright for comfort, but the view was fantastic considering adjacent seats were £40. If you can get it at this discounted price then it's well worth considering."

"K15: "The Hard Problem" (February 2015). £15 seats thus priced due to a “restricted view” but I was unaware of this until after the show. Not sure what I missed, but thought I could see everything. K15 is one of the ‘fold-up’ seats you flagged up in your notes. I had a chuckle to myself when I saw K14’s coat and bag where you had forecast they would be. The seat was great for £15 but if I had paid full whack I would have been annoyed."

"M26 and 27: "John" (February 2018), (Taljaard). At the back of the lower level. Really good seats. Brilliant views."

"M53: "Sunset at The Villa Thalia" (July 2016). Billed as restricted view .... Maybe the worst seat (view) I've ever had in a theatre. The stage has been extended into the void where several rows of the stalls have been removed. Sitting in that seat you are right behind a large pillar which basically means you can't see a thing unless you lean forward (therefore obscuring the view of those in M52 and M51 which I'm too polite to do) or lean back, but then the pillar still obscures most of the stage. It's a block of three seats and the couple in the other two seats left at the interval so I was able to move to M51 for the second half and got to actually see something. I was disappointed but suppose I should have realised that, just for once, restricted view really meant just that! £15 so I shouldn't grumble."

Dress Circle

Layout

Called Circle in this theatre.

Two rows of seats facing the stage, and two down either side.

The front row, N, are ordinary seats; the row behind are higher, raised on a high plinth, with foot rests that fold out. Both do not have arm-rests but are comfy.

Legroom

Row N is cramped for anyone over around 5ft 8.

Row P is good for the taller, though there isn't as much "knee room" as you may think.

Choosing seats in general

The monkey prefers P for comfort for sure.

Side rows N and P lose at least a tenth of the nearside stage to the wall in the way. The monkey would take seats nearest the stage first, to avoid the issue. It would also take row P before row N. N suffers far more loss of view as it is lower, and more expensive than P too. As a reader observes, if the stage is at one end of the theatre, you have to look sideways at the stage - and with the angle and anyone leaning... just go for rows M or L in the pit below at the sides before row N, feels the monkey.

The viewing angle is actually less comfortable the closer you get to the stage.

General hazard notes

Substantial loss of views when the stage is "end on" and folk lean into your view.

Pillars between P 9 / 10, 14 / 16, 53 / 54, 58 / 60 cut slightly into views, but are not that noticeable.

High seats may be difficult for the shorter or infirm.

The continuous row N may be claustrophobic for some.

Changes for the current production

Death of England: Staging is in the centre. Centre block L and seats in the middle at the sides are more expensive and have less legroom. Monkey would go for "high seats" in row P behind, if capable of climbing to them. Cheaper, same view.

All of Us: Stage in the centre seating on three sides. The side blocks are closer to the action, and at third price row P at the sides is a bargain. Go P 7 to 14 / 54 to 61 for the view.

Sea Sick: Stage in the centre seating on three sides. The side blocks are closer to the action, and at bottom price row P at the sides is a bargain. Go P 7 to 14 / 54 to 61 for the view.

Hamlet: Stage in the centre seating on three sides. The side blocks are closer to the action, but all seats are the same price as those in the Pit. Go P 7 to 14 / 54 to 61 for the view if you can’t get Pit seats. The high chairs may help children able to climb into them to see over those in front.

Readers comments

"N1: "Love" (December 2016). The view wouldn't have been ideal, but would have been the usual restricted view that you know you're going to get when booking that area. For people who have already bought those tickets though, it might be worth asking for an upgrade?"
"N9: "Here Lies Love" (September 2014) (Taljaard). For this show, this is the front row of the circle. Very comfy indeed."

"N10: "The Great Wave" (March 2018), (Taljaard). Bit of a side view but otherwise great."

"N15 and 16: "John" (January 2019). My friend and I has seats N15 and 16 (£39). The play is great but ... the view is seriously obstructed by the rail and lighting rig because large parts of the play take place on the far right hand side of the stage. My friends in £15 seats behind me had no worse a view. Fortunately, the play is more about what is said than what the actors physically do on stage, so it didn't ruin it. The tickets are just very overpriced."

"N17 and 18 "The Hard Problem" (January 2015). Oh dear the seats. We didn’t have a problem with the legroom (5ft 9) but hated having to twist round in our seats to see the stage which was also partly obscured. Most people sitting in the side rows ended up perched on their seats at 45 degrees. I won’t be booking the side seats again."

""Row P: "Love (December 2016). P low numbers (stage left) for Love at National fairly restricted view, a part of the set extends under the balcony."

"P10: "Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour" (September 2016), (Taljaard). Sat in P10 and missed nothing. Very good value for £15."

"P53: "Cleansed" (February 2016). Reduced to £20 due to pillar imposition. It's fair value, but I was pretty uncomfortable. I had to lean forward over the safety rail to get a decent view most of the time."

Upper Circle

Layout

Called Gallery in this theatre.

One row of seats facing the stage, and two down either side.

The front row, R, are ordinary seats; the row behind are higher, raised on a high plinth, with foot rests that fold out. Both do not have arm-rests but are comfy.

Legroom

Just acceptable for those of 5ft 7 in row M if willing to sit bolt upright in your seat, row S is good for the taller, though there isn't as much "knee room" as you may think.

Choosing seats in general

Seats facing the stage are fine, if you can accept the legroom.

Side rows R and S lose around a tenth of the nearside stage to the wall in the way. If the stage is "end on" a reader in R 22 to 24 noted they saw only 15% of the show. The viewing angle improves as you get closer to the stage, but loses more of what is directly below you, as it were.

General hazard notes

Row S seats are in small blocks surrounded by rails. Those under 5ft 4 or so may find their views blocked by that, and both they and the infirm may struggle to get into the high seats.

Vertigo sufferers may find row S a little too high for them.

Substantial loss of views when the stage is "end on" and folk lean into your view.

The continuous row R may be claustrophobic for some.

Changes for the current production

Death of England: Staging is in the centre, with central row R, plus some side seats at third price. Monkey would probably take cheaper row S behind the side ones, and those further along row R.

All of Us: Stage in the centre, seating on three sides. There’s better seats than centre R 31 to 50 lower down. Take the sides as a good deal – row S is more comfortable if tall. Take 1 to 7 / 58 to 64 to be closer to the action, but all are a bargain, feels the monkey.

Sea Sick: Stage in the centre, seating on three sides. There’s better seats than centre R 31 to 50 lower down on circle sides of row N. Take the sides as a good deal – row S is more comfortable if tall. Take 1 to 7 / 58 to 64 to be closer to the action, but all are a bargain, feels the monkey.

Hamlet: Stage in the centre, seating on three sides. All seats are a single price. The high chairs on row S are more comfortable if tall. Take 1 to 7 / 58 to 64 to be closer to the action, but all are a bargain, feels the monkey.

 

 

Readers comments

"Upper Gallery: "Love" (December 2016). For anyone in the upper gallery who has booked a seat on the side ..... Think you'll struggle to see much at all."

"Row R: "Love (December 2016). R low numbers (stage left) for Love at National fairly restricted view, a part of the set extends under the balcony."

"R12: "Home, I'm Darling (July 2018). I booked for this play last Friday. The two categories of cheapest tickets are both yellow in the key. Different shades but confusing if booking with phone where all seat levels may not be visible on screen. I clicked link for £22 ticket. Message said two available. Saw two yellow seats in Circle but was unable to select one. Thought problem with phone I was using for this. Requested best seat available, thinking it would be one of these. Seat was offered. No comment on restricted view when I made booking or on email confirmation. When I picked it up at theatre discovered it was R12 in gallery, facing RHS of stage. Ticket did indicate restricted view. About half of play’s action takes place in small kitchen on far right facing stage. Could only partly see small area of this room if I leaned forward. Ceilings of ground floor rooms also low so could not see actors in either of the rooms unless they were standing forward on the stage. Would not recommend row R under any circumstances. Was told could not change seat as sold out but a number of stalls seats were actually empty for the performance."

"R43: "The Tell Tale Heart" (December 2018), (Taljaard). Good seat and not too close to the gore."

"R44: "People, Places and Things" (September 2015). Couldn't recommend it enough. My seat - R44 at 25 pounds - was advertised as restricted but I had a clear view. Probably better than those in stalls in fact, as there are scenes were the floor is illuminated with visuals (similar to the Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time) and you get an overall view of these from where I sat."

"R70: "The Hard Problem" (January 2015), (Taljaard). Hovers above the front of the stage three tiers up. Good view for £15."

"S58: "Consent" (March 2017). I think you should know that the gallery seats for 'Consent' have their view badly obscured by a very inconsiderate feature of the set, namely dozens of lampshades suspended below the level of the gallery seats. So what is already a poor view (mainly of the tops of actors' heads, and in Seat S58 you sometimes just hear disembodied voices) has now been turned into a terrible one." 

Notes best seat advice

Seats 350 approx.

Air conditioned auditorium.

Audio described and signed performances regularly. Sennheiser Infrared. Smart Caption Glasses available for some productions. Guide dog sitter available. All printed information available in large print, on tape and in Braille. Minicom at the box office. Free car parking in centre car park for orange badge holders (get endorsement stamp at information desk). Lifts from car parks to all levels. Adapted toilets (unisex, sadly) throughout theatre. Fuller details from www.nationaltheatre.org.uk, the theatre on 020 7452 3000 (Minicom 020 7452 3009).

Food buffet restaurant at stalls level, coffee shop and formal restaurant in complex. Ice cream and confectionery from vendors just outside auditorium.

Bars at Stalls and Circle level. 

Toilets in Stalls and Circle, two gents and two ladies. Unisex disabled toilet at stalls level.

General price band information

Theatres use "dynamic pricing." Seat prices change according to demand for a particular performance. Prices below were compiled as booking originally opened. Current prices are advised at time of enquiry.

Based on paying FULL PRICE (no discount!) for tickets, site writers and contributing guests have ALSO created the colour-coded plans for "value for money," considering factors like views, comfort and value-for-money compared with other same-priced seats available.

For a full discussion, opinions, reviews, notes, tips, hints and advice on all the seats in this theatre, click on "BEST SEAT ADVICE" (on the left of your screen).

On the plans below:
Seats in GREEN many feel may offer either noticeable value, or something to compensate for a problem; for example, being a well-priced restricted view ticket. Any seats coloured LIGHT GREEN are sold at "premium" prices because the show producer thinks they are the best. The monkey says "you are only getting what you pay for" but uses this colour to highlight the ones it feels best at the price, and help everybody else find equally good seats nearby at lower prices.

Seats in WHITE, many feel, provided about what they pay for. Generally unremarkable.

Seats in RED are coloured to draw attention. Not necessarily to be avoided - maybe nothing specific is wrong with them, other than opinions that there are better seats at the same price. Other times there may be something to consider before buying – perhaps overpricing, obstructed views, less comfort etc.

Please remember that cheaper seats often do not offer the same view / location quality as top price ones, and that ticket prices are designed to reflect this difference.

By value for money:

Death of England

Dorfman Death of England value seating plan

All of Us

Dorfman Theatre All Of Us value seating plan

Sea Sick

Dorfman Theate Sea Sick value plan

Hamlet

Dorfman Theatre Hamlet value seating plan

By price:

Death of England

Dorfman Theatre Death of England prices seating plan

All of Us

Dorfman Theatre All Of Us prices seating plan

Sea Sick

Dorfman Theatre Sea Sick prices seating plan

Hamlet

Dorfman Theatre Hamlet value seating plan
Notes

Seating plans in this venue are NEVER finalised until previews end. Some details WILL ALWAYS change for all productions. The monkey will update as available.

Please note: The seating plans are not accurate representations of the auditorium. While we try to ensure they are as close to the actual theatre plan as possible we cannot guarantee they are a true representation. Customers with specific requirements are advised to discuss these with the theatre prior to booking to avoid any confusion.
 

-0.1146473, 51.5071127

Nearest underground station

Waterloo - Bakerloo Line (brown), Jubilee Line (silver gray), Northern Line (black). Also a main line station.
 

For mobility impaired audience members, the Society of London Theatre provide a "photo map" - illustrated walking route to this venue from a near landmark and also Waterloo Station (the nearest fully accessible station) on their website www.officiallondontheatre.co.uk, via the theatre's listing page on that site.

This station has multiple exits, not clearly marked, so be careful! The best route is as follows:

Turn left and head for the main exit - a grand archway with steps down to street level.

At street level, turn to your left, and walk towards the main road. Ahead to your left is a huge silver steel rectangle. No, the monkey does not know what it is either. To the left of it, and behind, is a pedestrian passageway called "Sutton Walk"; which goes under a bridge. Take it, at the end is a fountain ahead of you. 

You are now on "Concert Road Approach". Turn to your left. The Royal Festival Hall is ahead of you. Walk towards it. You are in an area of grey concrete called Belvedere Road.

Turn to your right, walk along this street under the bridge, and note that the road name changes to "Upper Ground".

The Royal National Theatre is ahead of you to the right. The entrance to the Dorfman Theatre is at the far end of the building, so walk on past the scenery entrance and Max Rayne Centre - the glass building sticking out into the paved area - and along to a column signpost with the NT symbol on it. Turn down the wide paved road / piazza combination area to your left, and you'll see another sign pointing along the paved area you are walking on, down to the National Theatre's car park.

The entrance to the Dorfman Theatre is along this street too, past the Clore Learning Centre to your left, about two thirds of the way down, where the shallow staircase is.
____________

If you have the misfortune to leave the station by the "Waterloo Road" exit, fear not. You can either walk through the Waterloo mainline station to the York Road exit, or take this route - CONSIDER YOUR PERSONAL SAFETY when choosing.

On leaving the glass doors, turn left. Walk to the corner, and turn left into "Mepham Street". Walk all the way to the end of it, avoiding the temptation to go under any bridges.

At the end of the street is York Road. Cross it. Ahead of you, to the left, is "Sutton Walk", the pedestrian road under the bridge. Take it.

You are now on "Concert Road Approach". Turn to your left. The Royal Festival Hall is ahead of you. Walk towards it. You are in an area of grey concrete called Belvedere Road.

Turn to your right, walk along this street under the bridge, and note that the road name changes to "Upper Ground".

The Royal National Theatre is ahead of you to the right. The entrance to the Dorfman Theatre is at the far end of the building, so walk on past the scenery entrance and Max Rayne Centre - the glass building sticking out into the paved area - and along to a column signpost with the NT symbol on it. Turn down the wide paved road / piazza combination area to your left, and you'll see another sign pointing along the paved area you are walking on, down to the National Theatre's car park.

The entrance to the Dorfman Theatre is along this street too, past the Clore Learning Centre to your left, about two thirds of the way down, where the shallow staircase is.
____________

Another visitor suggest this route: Take the tube to the Embankment station and walk across the Hungerford footbridge to the south bank, then walk past Festival Hall complex and under Waterloo Bridge.

The Royal National Theatre is ahead of you to the right. 

Walk past the stage door and the car park entrance, and the Dorfman Theatre entrance is in a new extension on the right, where the shallow staircase leads up to it.

Noted are the "Gorgeous views both up and down river on a good day or evening.". The monkey endorses this comment, especially at twilight!

Buses

1, 4, 68, X68, 168, 171, 176, 188, 501, 502, 513 to Waterloo Bridge.
Get off on the Bridge and look for the large advertising board on the roof of the National Theatre, facing the Thames. Take the stairs on this side of the bridge down to the ground. A safe crossing of the bridge can be made by taking the stairs down to first level and walking under it on a walkway linking the staircases either side of the bridge.

On the correct side staircase, leave it, turn to your right. The theatre is ahead of you to the right. 

The entrance to the Dorfman Theatre is at the far end of the building, so walk on past the circular floor sculpture and past the centre doors of the theatre and at the end of the building turn right. 

Walk past the stage door and the car park entrance, and the Dorfman Theatre entrance is in a new extension on the right, with a shallow staircase leading up to it.

Taxi

A rank for Black taxis is at Waterloo Station - a fair distance from the theatre, or try hailing one on Waterloo Bridge.

Car park

Under the theatre. Take the elevators in the centre of the car park to ground level.
Leave the elevator and exit the building by the glass doors between the elevators. Once outside, turn to your right, and at the end of the building turn right. 

Walk past the stage door and the car park entrance, and the Dorfman Theatre entrance is in a new extension on the right, with a shallow staircase leading up to it.

Theatremonkey advises parking near the exit ramps for a fast getaway after the show, and strongly recommends you note the compass point, colour band and number of the nearest pillar you park by. Banquo's ghost has nothing on the haunted souls who wander the underground space, wailing for their transport each night. Some have been there since the place opened in the 1970's.

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