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Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

ST JAMES THEATRE
(and "The Studio")
 

 

"Main Auditorium":


IN REPERTOIRE:

 

 

ERIC AND LITTLE ERN (comedy)
Ends 11th January 2015.
NOT SUITABLE FOR THOSE AGED UNDER 12.

A tribute to the great Morecambe and Wise, featuring some of their famous material... and a little of the performers' own...

A newly extended version returns following a successful West End season in late 2013.

Devised and performed by Ian Ashpitel and Jonty Stephens.



 

AND

 

THE SNOW DRAGON (children's play)
9th December 2014 until 4th January 2015.
Relaxed performance: 18th December 2014 at 10am.

Billy the Goat looks forward to the New Year's visit of the Snow Dragon... but first there are wolves to escape...


Suitable for those aged 3 and over.
 

 

"The Studio" schedule:


See www.stjamestheatre.co.uk for details of productions.

 

Events include:


Saturday 3rd until Friday 9th January 2015
Press Night: Tuesday 6th January 2015
 

Created by Foursight, presented by Angels in the Architecture & S², in association with St. James Theatre & Jacksons Lane present:

BETTE AND JOAN – THE FINAL CURTAIN
 

Bette Davis finally confronts the ghost of Joan Crawford in a new play which takes a wry, feisty and irreverent look at two of Hollywood’s greatest icons.

“One should only say good of the dead. Joan Crawford is dead. Good.” – Bette Davis

Now on her own deathbed, Davis is forced by Hollywood hacks Hedda Hopper and Louella Parsons to finally confront the ghost of her nemesis, Crawford herself. And of course, just because someone’s dead doesn’t mean they’ve changed.

Foursight Theatre (creators of Thatcher The Muscial! and Can Any Mother Help Me?) originally created this new comedic piece drawing on the lives of two women battling for supremacy in 2011, and it is now revived by the original cast and creative team to open the Icons Season.

When Bette Davis died in 1989 at the age of 81, she left behind a legacy of films that spanned the best part of a century of American movie making. During her career she won two Oscars and was nominated for ten.

She was and still is recognized as one of the greatest of female screen icons from the golden age of Hollywood. Known as ‘battling Bette’ she fully lived the glamorous film star lifestyle but beneath the gloss was a life strewn with the wrecks of four marriages, empty liquor bottles and embittered children.

One comforting thought for her at the time of her death might have been the knowledge that she had outlived her bitterest rival, Joan Crawford, by twelve years. Crawford had led an equally tumultuous life, echoing Bette’s on several levels: four husbands, a battle with the bottle and a daughter writing a vicious ‘tell all’ book about her, albeit posthumously. Crawford died in 1977 at the age of 73.

These two icons of the silver screen only ever made one full film together, Whatever Happened To Baby Jane?, a film noir thriller directed by Robert Aldrich. It was an astounding success and shot the two fading stars from the twilight of their careers back in to the limelight - both them, and the feud that supposedly existed between them.

Devised and performed by: Sarah Thom & Sarah Toogood
Script by: James Greaves
Co-Directors: Rebecca McCutcheon & Sarah Thom
Design: Amy Yardley, with Talulah Mason
Lighting Design: Matt Haskins
Sound Design: Elena Pena
Video: Ed Sayers


Performance Times and dates in 2015:
Sat 3 Jan at 7.45pm
Sun 4 Jan at 1pm
Sun 4 Jan at 6.30pm
Tues 6 Jan at 7.45pm
Wed 7 Jan at 7.45pm
Thu 8 Jan at 4pm
Thu 8 Jan at 7.45pm
Fri 9 Jan at 7.45pm


Ticket prices:
Studio Floor £17.50
Studio Gallery £20.00
Studio Upper Gallery £17.50
Studio Standing £12.50

£12.50 matinee offer for Students & Seniors.

On Tuesday 6th January 2015 there will be a post-show Q&A with the cast and creative team and Martin Shingler.* This will be open to all audience members with a ticket to the 7:45pm performance.

There will be a screening of the film ‘What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?’ on Sunday 4 January at 3:30pm. (book a ticket for the play and the film for £21).

Get £15 Studio Floor tickets when you buy tickets for 3 shows or more in the Icons Season. This will automatically be added at the check-out. Shows include:
Dylan Thomas: Clown in the Moon
Burton
The Unremarkable Death of Marilyn Monroe
Miss Dietrich Regrets

 


 

Theatremonkey Opinion:
"Eric and Little Ern" (December 2014): Not available. Reports are that this is a warm, seasonally-appropriate event, where dying Ernie is visited in his hospital bed by the ghost of Eric. They proceed to exchange some well-loved lines, reminding us of the ice-cream quip, Previn's notes, and every moment of banter in between. It's the capturing of mannerisms that impress professional reviewers most, together with the affection displayed towards the famous duo by their impersonators. If the biography elements seem a little too imposed on the comedic flow, no matter. This is considered a heartfelt and joyous gentle celebration that fans will not want to miss.
 

The Snow Dragon: Not available.
 

Your Reviews: Add your own by clicking here.
Important: Some reviews below can contain "spoilers" - please don't read if this bothers you!

.



  

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Performance Schedule:
The monkey advises checking performance times on your tickets and that performances are happening as scheduled, before travelling.


"Eric and Little Ern" (December 2014):

Tuesday to Saturday at 7.30pm
Saturday at 3.30pm and 7.30pm
Sunday at 4pm and 7pm


26th and 28th December 2014 at 4pm and 7pm
31st December 2014 at 3.30pm only
Extra performance on 8th January 2014 at 3.30pm
4th and 11th January 2014 at 4pm only


No performances on 24th and 25th December 2014 and 1st and 5th January 2015.

 



 

The Snow Dragon:
Tuesday to Saturday at 10am and 12 noon
Sunday at 11am and 1.30pm

EXCEPT:

Tuesdays 23rd and 30th December 2014 and Saturday 3rd January 2015 at 11am and 1.30pm
(No 10am and 12 noon performances on these dates)

Extra performances at 11am and 1.30pm on 22nd, 23rd and 29th December 2014
(No 10am and 12 noon performances on 23rd December 2014)

Extra performance at 1.30pm on 2nd January 2015
(No 10am and 12pm performances on 2nd January 2014)


NO performances on 24th and 25th December 2014 and 1st January 2015.

Runs 50 minutes approximately.

 

 

 

See www.stjamestheatre.co.uk for details of productions in "The Studio."
 

 

Ticket Prices:

Offers May be available - Click Here

View this information in diagram form for "Main Auditorium" productions.


"Eric and Little Ern" (December 2014):
Rows A to M: £35 except
"Premium seats" row D 8 to 18 and rows E to J 7 to 17: £45
Row N: £20

Buy four £35 seats for £120 at all performances. Use code "XMASSPECIAL" at the checkout on the St James Theatre website. Tickets must be purchased in a single transaction for a single performance. The party must be seated together.


 

 

The Snow Dragon:
All seats: £16 except:
"Premium" seats row C 9 to 19; D 8 to 18 and E 7 to 17: £18

"Family Ticket": Four £16 seats for £55. Extra seats can be purchased for £13.75 each. Tickets must be purchased from the box office, in person, by phone or online. The booking must be made in a single transaction for a single performance. The party must be seated together and include at least 1 adult and 1 child.
 

 

 

See www.stjamestheatre.co.uk for details of productions in "The Studio."
 

 

 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Buying Tickets Online:

Other Box Office Information

Tickets offered differ between outlets. Outlets also may offer different seats via their phone and online systems. Offers may be available click here.
Theatre Box Office:
www.stjamestheatre.co.uk

This venue sells its own tickets.
The site allows you to choose your own tickets in the main auditorium (not the Studio, where seats are unreserved and locations change) from those available.

Booking fees per ticket for online bookings:
An optional £1 per booking, not per ticket, postage fee applies.
 

Other Online Choices (with S.T.A.R. genuine ticket agencies):


"Eric and Little Ern" (December 2014):
When you require a wider selection of seats than the theatre can offer, the Theatremonkey Ticketshop, 020 7420 9778 (0044 207 420 9778 if calling from outside the United Kingdom), is a good option. Run by LoveTheatre, this reputable agency offers a selection of £45 and £35 seats with no booking fee per ticket. A £1.95 per booking, not per ticket, handling fee may apply on some transactions by telephone. NO handling fee applies for online purchases.

Encore Tickets (telephone 0207 400 1253 / 0044 207 400 1253 if calling from outside the United Kingdom) offer seats with a £10 fee on £35 (£13 on £45) tickets. A postage charge of £2.25 per booking, not per ticket may be applied to bookings made from UK addresses more than 5 days before the performance. The "Flexiticket" Exchange Service, allowing FREE transfer / cancellation (credit note up to 12 months) of your booking up to 3 days before the performance is also available for £2.50 per ticket. Discounted tickets, Meal and show packages may also be available. Quality and Value hotel / theatre ticket packages are also available.

Londontheatredirect.com offer £45 seats reduced to £35 each at all performances. Collecting tickets from the box office before your performance is free, OR, if required and time allows, there is a postage charge option of of £2.95 (£4.95 to non-UK addresses) per booking, not per ticket applies to all bookings. Optional Ticket Insurance is also available. Discounts and Meal and Show Packages may also be available.

 

 

The Snow Dragon:
Ticketmaster offer £18 and £16 seats with a £2.50 per ticket booking fee. A £2.85 per booking (not per ticket) handling charge is also added. This system may allow you to choose your own seats from the selection the company has available.


 

Other Independent S.T.A.R. ticket agencies may also offer an alternative choice of seats.
 

Box Office Information:
Tickets offered differ between outlets. Outlets also may offer different seats via their phone and online systems. Offers may be available click here.
Theatre Box Office:
0844 264 2140
Operated by the venue.

Booking fees per ticket for telephone bookings:
An optional £1 per booking, not per ticket, postage fee applies.
 

For personal callers or by post: 12 Palace Street, London SW1E 5JA. 
No booking fee for personal callers. The venue box office normally opens each performance day at 10am for over-the-counter sales, but check by telephone before making a special journey.

Special Access Needs Customers:
Wheelchair users and other registered disabled theatregoers can book their seats on 0844 264 2140 and enquire about concessionary prices that may be available to them.

www.stjamestheatre.co.uk is the official venue website.

 

 
 
Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Theatre Seat Opinions:
Please remember that cheaper seats often do not offer the same view / location quality as top price ones, and that ticket prices are designed to reflect this difference.

NOTE: This is a new venue, and opinions are based on "first impressions." It takes time for any theatre to settle in, and the monkey very much welcomes guests' views to build up a broader picture: contact us.

This venue is visually amazing. Under a block of apartments, the ground and first floors are glass affairs rather like an advanced version of the "New London" Theatre. A spectacular 28 tonne Italian marble staircase, shipped in 17 pieces to the theatre, is the highlight of a stunning foyer.

 

Seating Plan Diagram

Main Auditorium

"The Studio" Auditorium

Notes

Main Auditorium
Soundproofed, thanks to multiple doors.

This is possibly the first "usher's torch free" auditorium in London, thanks to innovative "light up" row letters in the aisle floor, and 'intensity adjustable' downlighting below the aisle wall handrails. Other auditorium lighting can also be changed to glow practically any shade, warming the cool grey walls and enhancing the look of the angular deep red seating.

Layout:
A single block of seats face the stage. They rise steeply upwards on steps from the stage.

Up to 8 seats in rows A to F, and 4 from row G back curve round towards the stage.

The audience enter from the foyer to a rear cross-aisle aisle behind seat N1. Either walking behind row N (to the "high number seats") or using the adjacent aisle by seat N1, all then descend (3 steps between each row, except N) to their seats.

The stage area itself is fully adjustable. Walls can be pushed in or out to create "wing" space, and a removable floor can replace rows A and B to create a totally flat open space. Alternatively, a proper stage can be installed. The monkey has currently tested the "flat floor" format, and will add information as the new layouts are revealed by future productions.

Unlike other venues, where seats curve inwards, there is no "knees touching" in any seat - there is space for all to sit back and enjoy the show.

Narrow, short armrests are provided between all seats, further maintaining decorum.

Legroom:
In the front rows A to C, this varies by production, depending how the stage is arranged - see "Changes for the current production" below.

Elsewhere, what needs knowing is that all the theatre's seats are designed to keep the user sitting totally upright at all times. This is essential as legroom is otherwise limited in most seats. The row in front rises with "flat backs" putting the 5ft 7 monkey's legs and feet into the "Z" position when seated. Bolt-upright, with knees one inch from the seat in front and toes held back parallel with kneecaps. That is the position in almost all seats in the auditorium. Not uncomfortable in an empty "test" position for a few minutes, but not yet tested in a full auditorium for an hour or more. The monkey welcomes further feedback - contact us.

The only exceptions are seats G1 and 23. These have slightly more legroom (particularly for the right leg in 1 and the left in 23) as the row in front curves towards the stage. The front row has unlimited legroom if the stage is not raised. The monkey further suspects a few front row seats may also have a little more space too in other configurations, and will test this when possible.

Seats themselves are adequate for the average width, the largest may (as always) be far less comfortable - though all are kept cool as most seats have individual cooling vents under them.

A reader also noticed that where the row curves, there is a "double armrest" giving extra width.

Choosing Seats in General:
Rows A to F curve at the ends to surround the stage. Further back, the ends of the other rows also angle in slightly. All focus on the stage and the monkey thinks (but has not tested over time yet) that when "wings" are in place, no seat will have less than a perfect view.

Interestingly, seats to the sides have an equal, if not slightly better than average, view of the stage. The feeling of "looking inwards" is heightened, providing slightly more intimacy than those seats "face on" to the stage. From the stage, the actor easily engages even the furthest seats, thanks to the simplicity of the design.

Centrally, there is a reason that the middle of rows D and E are at "premium" prices for views. The perfect height - just above actors' eye level, and taking in the whole stage with ease.

Further back, around row J, a technical gallery spans the auditorium. Not really noticeable, just interesting, feels the monkey. The aim of the venue is "classy, off-Broadway" feel, which (never having been "off-Broadway") the monkey thinks is about right.
More interesting still, rear rows don't feel that far from the stage.

A particular revelation is row N. The back row is raised on a plinth to maintain the "rake" of the auditorium. A sound desk can replace seats 11 and 12 if required. Beyond this, seats numbered from 13 upwards will go on sale 20 minutes before the production, once wheelchair users have been settled. This part of row N can be adjusted to provide up to 6 wheelchair users or up to 3 users and 3 friends with views comparable to anywhere else in the auditorium.

As the staff noted to the monkey, the only reason row N is cheaper is that it gives visitors a choice. The difference in view is negligible. Monkey buying advice (based on very first impressions) is that front rows are simply closer to the stage, and that aisle seats provide a little "wriggle space" and are less claustrophobic for those who dislike long rows.

For views, take rows C, F then G at top price first (or "premium" seats in rows D and E - E first, then D), then simply go forward or back, and inwards or outwards (hokey-cokey style, the monkey cheers), as personal preference dictates - there's little difference, it feels.

The only issue the monkey highlights with the entire venue is actual seat comfort - for which (along with other general views of course) it welcomes feedback - contact us.

General Hazard Notes:
That legroom really is an issue for many.

Handrails at the end of each row won't affect sightlines but may irritate purists.

Row A to C extreme end seats may find an actor’s back to them, depending on staging.

Changes for the current production:
"Eric and Little Ern" (December 2014):
The front row is row A. No price reductions at the ends of either this row or B, allowing for potential restricted views, so skip the outermost 3 seats in both rows until the sightlines are confirmed, as at top price they often have a lesser view.

Central rows D to J are "premium" priced. Better seats around them, cheaper, feels the monkey. H and J in particular seem a long way back for the cash.

Row N may be a very slightly better comfort option and cheaper than L and M in front of it, particularly for the taller (well, who can use the extra inch of legroom), and is the only cheaper row in the theatre for this show. About average value.

 

The Snow Dragon: Almost all seats are the same price. There's cheaper seats with the same view around the premium ones in rows C to E, but for an extra £2, some may feel it makes little difference. Still, the monkey would go for tickets around them first. With other seats the same price, take those nearest the front first (skip the outer 3 on rows A and B for angle to the stage, perhaps) and take L back last. For the small theatregoers, this venue is ideal as it has high steps between rows... bigger theatregoers may find the legroom a problem, though...

 

Reader Comments:
"Theatre: Why didn’t the powers that be make the seats more comfortable when they had the luxury of a new build? There is no legroom, except for seats G1 and G23 where the end seats of row F curve inward. Admittedly, the view is exceptional from every seat, but I don’t want to be thinking about my knees during such a wonderful performance. We’ve seen some great productions at St James’ theatre, but the legroom is always a problem."

"A25: "Bully Boy" (October 2012), (David Hurrell). I had seat A25 at the end of the angle that rounds the stage. In addition to insufficient leg-room there are two other disadvantages: 1) The seat is very side on and so close to the stage that one's view of the action can be obscured by staring at a character's back and 2) one suffers from the glare of the lights. The management would do well to shorten the angles."

"Row B: 'Daddy Long Legs' (November 2012), (David Hurrell). I noted that the seats at either end of Row A that stood at an angle to the stage and about which I adversely commented to you in my review of 'Bully Boy' in October 2012' have now been removed, leaving just the 10 seats facing the stage. Needless to say the seats at either end of row B now have marvellous leg-room - just waiting for a daddy long legs in fact! (May of course not happen for every show, editor)."

"Row E: "Daddy Long Legs" (November 2012). "Went to this new theatre for the first time last night to see "Daddy Long Legs" - ironic title since the seating is the most uncomfortable I've ever experienced. I'm not unusually tall but found it impossible to move my legs which ended up bent back under the seat, this is the only time I've almost left a show part-way through due to discomfort. Luckily at the interval I was able to move to an aisle seat which gave me room to spread out sideways. Seems incredible to get this so wrong in a brand new theatre."

"K18: "Daddy Long Legs" (November 2012), (Dannie). "I was in seat K18, and was pleased with the seat. I had a nice view of the whole stage and was able to clearly see the emotions on the actors’ faces. I’m 5’4”, and by the end of the show felt the legroom was adequate for me, but not amazing. There is an extra armrest between seats 18 and 17, due to the curve of the auditorium. This meant the person in seat 17 and I had our own armrest instead of jockeying to share one. From what I could tell the double armrest was present in all of the rows due to the curve, but I’m not sure if they were all 17 and 18 (and didn’t look at the numbers on the other side). The seats in front of mine for the next two rows were empty, so I can’t comment about heads in the way. Given the steep rake of the theatre I don’t think that would be much of a problem."

"N12 and 13: "Putting it Together" (January 2014). I was a little apprehensive having read that the seats at the St James' Theatre were terribly uncomfortable, and having sat through "The Pride" at the Trafalgar Studios which has awful seating, I was a bit nervous. I am 6ft, as is my partner. We sat in row N in seats 12 and 13. Seat 13 was next to a sound man set up, so there was no one to my left. We had a great view of the stage and I have to say it was very comfortable. I didn't feel squashed and was able to sit very easily without hitting the seat in front of me. I did probably help that I had a little space next to me, but my partner who was sat between two people was absolutely fine."



 


"The Studio" Auditorium
This is a truly amazing space, on 2 levels, with a stage that can be confined to a corner or extended along a wall. A sound desk / DJ booth puts out music, a bar will quietly (so no hissing coffee machine here) serve alcoholic and soft cold drinks during intervals when the performer isn't actually performing, and the atmosphere even as the rush is on to finish it, is amazing.
Think "secret club" for the glittering crowd, and you are about there. Perfect for anything from chamber music to burlesque - and equipped for either, with a grand piano for music or just a stage setting.

GROUND LEVEL

Layout:
An L shaped room with an adjustable sized corner stage. This can have any mixture of seats and tables arranged to face it. Movable banquettes provide further adjustable seating along one wall, and there may be a few bar stools too. Three thin pillars simply add to the atmosphere down here.

An L shaped "VIP Gallery" overhangs the floor below.

Legroom:
Comfort is good everywhere, thanks to the well-chosen furnishings – a mixture of movable chairs and banquettes, and the monkey highly recommends this venue.

Choosing Seats in General:
Seats are not reserved, and you may well share a table with a new friend... You’ll enjoy sitting anywhere as the view is fine – just shift your chair a bit if you think a pillar is too close.

General Hazard Notes:
Pillars dotted around - just move your chair to see around them.

Changes for the current production:
None.

Reader Comments:
"Studio:  Amazing, arranged in a nightclub format and very comfortable with an intimate atmosphere – drinks and food available at the bar – what more could you ask for!"
 


GALLERY LEVEL
also called the VIP GALLERY in this auditorium.

Layout:
An L shape, with a long low gallery facing the stage.

The short end of the L is in three tiers, one on the same level as the rest of the gallery, the other two raised on steps behind, with glass barriers in front of each rise.

Legroom:
Comfort is good everywhere, thanks to the well-chosen furnishings – a mixture of movable chairs. These may be a little low for the tallest, perhaps.

Choosing Seats in General:
The "long side" is at perfect distance to the stage for a performer to take it in with a casual glance, creating an incredible intimacy. Seats on this length are comfortable swivelling low arm-chairs, with tables between. Just 9 of them, and if you have one, you'll feel privileged, feels the monkey.

Along the short side of the gallery, the lowest is on the same level as the "long" length, with a further 4 seats and tables. Slightly further from the stage, the rail in front won't affect anybody but the shortest.

The "middle gallery" (as the monkey unilaterally dubbed it - to the horror of the box office manager showing it around) is the most "middling" for view. It's OK, though in low seats you may be a little more conscious of those in front and may notice looking through two rows of glass and chrome rails.

The "upper gallery" (see above on dubbing - though the venue now use the term!) was the one that the monkey has now claimed for its own (no "peanut gallery" lines, thank you). Four tall stools, and a perfect "overview" of everything going on practically everywhere in the room. With 3 friends, privacy is guaranteed. Access to the bar, bathrooms and exits nearby are simple, and the seats comfy. Once its ban is lifted, that's where you'll find it.

General Hazard Notes:
The balcony rail may be a little high for the shortest person to see over.

Upper Gallery seating is on high stools. The short may be left with legs dangling...

Changes for the current production:
None.

Reader Comments:
"VIP Gallery Level:  I sat in the studio gallery, I mean not the upper gallery, but the L shaped bit. Tall people needn’t worry, but I’m 5ft5 and found the bar running along the front of the gallery a pain as it was right at my eye level. I had to slouch back in the seat a little and look through the glass instead. This was fine, but the people next to me had the same problem and occasionally chose to lean forward, their elbows slightly over the rail, which hampered my viewing angle somewhat. If I went back I think I’d go a bit further along the aisle, facing full on to the stage, or else take a seat on the short side of the ‘L’ shape - on the face of it a poorer view, but probably less chance of people leaning into your line of vision… Nice comfy seats but don’t wriggle too much – they can wobble a bit! Despite the issue with the bar, I’d definitely choose to sit here again rather than on the studio floor – it looked like the seats are packed way too tightly down there for this claustrophobic/antisocial theatregoer!"


 

Notes
312 seats in the main auditorium.
120 seats in "The Studio"

Air Conditioned. Individual vents under most seats in the main auditorium particularly help cooling here - don't put your coats over them, though!

Hearing Loop available. Wheelchair access is flat to both auditoriums: slope or 1 step from street into foyer. Flat from foyer to main auditorium through 2 sets of heavy soundproof doors. Up to 6 wheelchairs, or 3 wheelchairs plus 3 companions can take spaces in row N, replacing seats 13 to 23 as required - seats break down in units of 2. 3 small steps between all other rows. Access to "The Studio" is via lift from the foyer, or down 16 steps to "Gallery" level and then another 17 steps to "Main Floor" level. Access to the foyer bar is flat. Access to the main restaurant is via a lift from the foyer or up 17 steps. Adapted unisex toilets on foyer and "The Studio" Gallery level. For performers, there is a massive, state of the art adapted bathroom / shower room available, flat access from dressing rooms to main stage and a chair carrying lift to "The Studio" stage level. To book tickets or for information, email the venue access(insert @ symbol here)stjamestheatre.co.uk or call the box office on 0844 264 2140.

Food: Ice cream and confectionary. Main foyer: A large bar area in the main foyer is open 8am to 10.30pm for bar snacks and hot food. Restaurant: First floor. "The Buttery" has between 50 and 62 places, serving "British" fare from 8am until 10.30pm daily. Event ticketholders can book tables from 5.30pm until performance time, the general public are also welcome. Bar on the main floor of "The Studio" (also accessible by concealed staircase from the Gallery level). This will serve cold soft and alcoholic drinks only.

The theatre has public WIFI access in foyer areas.

Cloakroom: On "The Studio" Gallery Level. Roaming hosts will take guests coats to this cloakroom if required.

4 toilets: foyer - 1 gents 1 cubicles / 4 urinals, 1 ladies 5 cubicles, 1 unisex disabled; lower level - 1 gents 3 cubicles / 4 urinals, 1 ladies 10 cubicles. 1 unisex disabled.

The monkey gratefully thanks the new owners for their help in compiling this information.

 
Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Getting to this Theatre
Find this theatre on a Street Map The theatre entrance is slightly above the red arrow.
Nearest Underground Station Buses Car Park
Nearest Underground Station:
Victoria - Victoria (light blue) and Circle (yellow) and District (green) lines. Also Main rail network terminus.

From the Victoria line ticket barriers, turn to your left. Follow the curve of the barriers around until you see an exit sign for "Wilton Road". Go under this sign and up the stairs.

From the District and Circle line ticket barriers, you have two choices. 

Either you can turn left on leaving the underground ticket barriers, go up the stairs and exit the station. Follow the street to your right, and the Victoria Palace Theatre appears ahead of you, across the road to your left.

Alternatively, on leaving the underground ticket barriers, turn to your right, and look along diagonally for a tunnel sign marked "National Rail". Walk under it and down a gentle slope. This will bring you into the Victoria line hall. Follow the curve of the ticket barriers around until you see an exit sign for "Wilton Road". Go under this sign and up the stairs.


The Victoria Palace theatre is in front of you, across a busy road.

It is possible to access the theatre from Buckingham Palace Road, straight down Palace Street. From the station, turn left onto Victoria Street, right onto Buckingham Palace Road, cross Bressenden Place, continue down to Palace Place, turning left into it. That is a far longer walk, though.

ALTERNATIVE ROUTE SUGGESTED BY A READER:

A Local resident writes, "I live in the area and suggest a route that's certainly no longer (maybe shorter!), that's less complex, and that I think is more pleasant. Here it is:

-- Leave the front of the station and cross Victoria Street (as in your directions);
-- Turn right on Victoria Street, follow it across Bressenden Place and go straight on for maybe another 50 metres;
-- Turn left into Cardinal Place shopping centre (just past the Moulton Brown shop and before Goldsmiths);
-- Walk straight back through Cardinal Place, which is an outside space (with a glass roof in spots) and is open to the public 24/7;
-- Walk past the M&S on the right and straight through to Palace Street;
-- At Palace Street, look to the left and the St James Theatre is right there.

So -- in essence: out of the Station onto Victoria Street; left turn into Cardinal Place; Theatre is on the left at Palace Street.

You can save a few steps by going through Cardinal Place immediately after crossing Bressenden Place, on a diagonal from the street corner (going between the Lloyds on the right and the Browns on the left) and then turning left at the centre of Cardinal Place -- but that seems a bit more complex to explain.

Sounds like a good choice, thinks the monkey. Reader Dannie agrees, saying,
"I used the alternative route suggested by one of your readers, and had no trouble finding the theatre, even with the construction work going on around Victoria Station."


Either way, it's around 15 minutes to walk from the station to the theatre, feels the monkey - who is a fast walker...

 

Buses:
16, 38, 42, 52, 73, 82, 148 stop nearby on Buckingham Palace Road. Walk down Palace Street. The theatre is the large pale coloured building ahead of you, after crossing Palace Place.

8, 11, 24, 36, 38, 73, 211, 511 To Victoria Bus Station. See directions from "Nearest Underground Station" above.

 

Taxi:
Can be hailed outside, but more easily on Buckingham Palace Road. Leave the theatre, turn right if leaving the main entrance, keeping the foyer glass windows to your right. Walk straight on to the end of Palace Street, crossing Palace Place. At the end of the road, across the street ahead is a brick wall - the Royal Mews. You have reached Buckingham Palace Road.

Taxis can also be hailed from the rank at Victoria Station. See directions from "Nearest Underground Station" above.

 

Car Park:
None are close. The theatre suggest Eccleston Bridge Place (walk down Bridge Place to Wilton Road, pass the Apollo Victoria Theatre, cross towards the Victoria Palace Theatre and follow directions from "Nearest Underground Station" above.

On street parking may be available after 6.30pm (all day Sunday) but is limited - even more so by building work in the area.

This venue does not participate in any discount parking scheme.
 

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