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Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

 

PRINCE OF WALES THEATRE


 

   

 

THE BOOK OF MORMON (musical)
NOT SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN OR THE EASILY OFFENDED. CONTAINS VERY STRONG LANGUAGE AND ADULT MATERIAL. ALSO CONTAINS STROBE LIGHTING, FLASHING LIGHTS AND GUNSHOTS.

Two newly trained Mormon Elders are sent to Africa on a mission to convert the locals...

From the team who brought you anarchic comedy TV cartoon "South Park," this is more of the same, with Broadway tunes.


www.bookofmormonlondon.com/tickets has updates on the latest availability of normal tickets, including information on returns and ticket releases.
 

Theatremonkey Opinion:

(Seen at the 2.30pm preview performance on 2nd March 2013).

This is the slickest transfer the monkey has ever seen. The production feels like it originated on the West End stage, rather than an import after a “bus and truck” trek across the USA. It is impossible not to admire the highest standards set in every aspect - staging, design, lighting, direction and of course performance.

Alexia Khadime brings a fabulous naivety to Mafala Hatimbi, a simple African girl bewitched by Mormanism and bewitching one of two amazing real Americans (Jared Gertner) in the cast. Getner’s partner in Mormonism, Gavin Creel, also justifies his transatlantic journey bringing an energy that never flags. Other standouts in the cast include Chris Jarman as a cross between Idi Amin and Mr T, and a suitably horrified Stephen Ashfield as Elder McKinley.

So, plaudits the monkey can agree on are out of the way. It comes to the show itself. And for the first time ever, it is going to write two reviews of it. Simply because this show can be taken either way... and it honestly can’t decide which it feels more strongly...

First review: this is where those “terribly witty at interpreting Fraternity Humour” chaps who wrote the clever revues at Harvard and Yale moved on to. A knowing and very adult romp. It imbues all who see and “get” the parodies with a wonderful veneer of sophistication; thus transcending the strong language and very ‘daring’ comedy, to take in several useful points about religion and world matters.

Laugh? You’ll rarely stop at some inventive parodies of religious and maniacal dictators, victims and saviours; and one inspired hospital joke that may have raised a Kenneth Williams eyebrow. Oh, and you’ll never again see “The Sound Of Music,” “Wicked,” “Annie,” “Fiddler on the Roof,” “The Lion King,” “A Chorus Line” or “The King and I” in the same light.

Leave humming the catchy “Hasa Diga Eebowai,” having taken a wonderful two hours out from everyday life. It may be a “one time show – once you’ve got the joke, you don’t need to go again,” but you have to admire the post-modernity of it all.

Second review: just why is this foul-mouthed show is the toast of New York, is it all an elaborate hoax? In the first 20 minutes audiences get the stage equivalent of a cute 5-year-old saying “bum” and getting a big laugh from the adults. The child thus repeats it ad nauseam, with rapidly diminishing returns, until his adoption can be arranged.

A (when the monkey saw it, and estimated at least) 99.5% white middle-class audience considered it fine to roar with laughter at ‘US perspective’ stereotypical “victim Africa.” The script excuses an uncomfortable-if-you-think-about-it ‘typewriter’ gag (among many others) with a final payoff “we recognise a metaphor so we are not stupid poor people, so look, the writers don't mean any of it.”

Aside from the fact there are so few leading West End parts specifically for black actors, a liberal mind may ponder, “just how desperate some of the cast were for the job, and if some of them had read the script before signing?”  

And that is, of course, before the title religion is considered. It’s interesting to speculate on whether the writers might have taken on one Middle Eastern faith in the same manner... given that during the show it’s tellingly the one religion they don’t mention. A cowardly opting for a safer target, perhaps? Oh, and just for the record, if there is a sequel about that other belief system, the monkey won’t be requiring a ticket, thanks.

Simply, this musical will divide audiences into those seeing it as “a gay romp with Mormons and Villagers in Africa” and those willing to analyse just why they did feel so uncomfortable with what they were watching.

For the broadest minded or “South Park” fan wanting a hip, adult, Rolls-Royce quality finish of a musical that will deliver solid belly laughs without requiring thought, this delivers perhaps beyond anything else in London. Others may find it raises more moral questions than even a fifth volume of the greatest book ever written might be able to answer.

 

Your Reviews: Add your own by clicking here.
Important: Some reviews below can contain "spoilers" - please don't read if this bothers you!

(13 reviews)

This has to be the most disappointing thing I've seen at the theatre for years - possibly because I believed the hype and actually expected the musical of the century.

The songs were nowhere near as clever as those in the 'South Park' movie and apart from the tap number, the choreography was nothing special. The rest of the audience seemed to lap it up though.

A special note to anyone who doesn't like heights - we sat in row H of the dress circle and were almost level with the top of the proscenium arch. Good view but VERY high up looking down on stage and very steep rake.

Kenneth.
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We saw 'Book of Mormon' at the Prince of Wales last night (5th March 2013). I would say for this show the best seats are the front centre stalls up to around half way back. I wouldn't want to be much further away or upstairs, I think you wouldn't feel as involved. I was in E14 and that was a pretty much perfect seat with a ton of legroom. Technically the sound was great, I had read comments from people missing too many lyrics from the front stalls but they must have corrected this over first few previews. The staff at the theatre are amazingly friendly as well, from the lady who excitedly told me I had great seats to the ushers inside.

As for the show, it was one of the most enjoyable comedy musicals I have ever seen. Its a shame if the word of mouth or review concentrate on any "shock" factor in some of the songs or swearing because really the joy of the show is its warm heart. We all have different tastes of course but I personally can't understand anyone not getting caught up in its lovable characters and catchy songs. I thought it was hysterically funny too, I laughed constantly all night. I would say to people try to see it as soon as possible with Gavin Creel and Jared Gertner who were brought over from the US casts, they are both very special in their roles.
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The Book of Mormon, 5th March 2013, Prince of Wales Theatre, Circle B13. Safety rail very slightly obscured the view of the front of stage. Theatre was very warm.

"The Book of Mormon" was not high on my wish list after hearing an interview of Trey Parker and Matt Stone and snippets of the music on radio 4. So when my partner bought tickets as a birthday surprise I was not exactly enthusiastic. It didn't take long to win me over though. From the opening number, "Hello!", featuring trainee Mormons with too many teeth, ringing on doorbells it was clear that the interviewer (Humphries) had got it completely wrong. This IS a traditional musical, although with modern (adult) language.

The music is old-fashioned, and not at all challenging, with multiple references to other musicals (Annie, Sound of Music, Lion King) but it works well, particularly in the ensemble pieces. There's plenty of melody and harmony and a lot of dance, again it's the old fashioned variety, with much to please. The humour is puerile and to get the most out of it you have to put your frontal lobes on hold. The first half zipped along. The creators have a reputation for shock and vulgarity and this is certainly not a musical for children or anyone who is easily offended. Most of the people I overheard during the interval commented that it "wasn't at all shocking or offensive", which is a surprising conclusion for a musical that depicts Africans as baby raping savages who live in mud huts. The second half was better, perhaps because I had acclimatised to the humour.

There were plenty of laughs throughout, and for me "Turn It Off" and "Spooky Mormon Hell Dream" were the stand-out funny numbers.
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Had an impromptu visit to London yesterday (10th March 2013) having managed to get a ticket for BOM in the week – thanks to the Delfont Mackintosh website for releasing some last minute tickets!

Sat in the stalls, K14 which was the end of the aisle. A perfect view of the stage, although the very top was missing. Apparently this means I missed a spinning statue of Jesus or something like that at the start of each act but if that’s all I'm not complaining. It felt close enough to the stage to feel involved in the action, but far enough away to take everything in. With this show, there is so much going on on stage I think this was an advantage. I think the Prince Of Wales is probably the most generous London theatre I have been in for legroom, and even at 6' 5" I felt that there was plenty of room. If only other theatres could have the same money spent on them to help improve this situation.

The show itself? Firstly this cast is fantastic, there is not a weak link amongst them. Particular standouts though were Gavin Creel, Stephen Ashfield and Alexia Khadime, but this would be as much to do with their roles being so prominent as opposed to any fault on the part of others.

The show is completely outrageous, those who want to be offended will find plenty to be offended by, those who want a good laugh will find even more to enjoy. I was particularly impressed by the fact that the show did have real heart in amongst all the mayhem and tasteless humour, and had that wonderful freewheeling feel where I genuinely didn't know what was going to happen next. Because of this, I am not sure how well it would stand up to repeat viewings as the element of surprise was a big factor in my enjoyment. A lot of the laughs are created from a "I can't believe they just said / did that" kind of perspective, so overfamiliarity would blunt that. However, I feel the rush to get tickets is justified.

This is a show in supremely good shape, and is different to anything else that is around at the moment. I do wonder what the Daily Mail will make of it come review time. I can only imagine what my wife would have said if she had come with me!!!!
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Firstly, this must be one of the best theatres in London, a really beautiful restoration. We sat in Dress Circle row G 25 and 26 in the centre block, not a seat we would normally book but found it excellent with plenty of legroom (6’1”). The upright, straight backed seats were very comfortable and there was a very steep rake which meant a great view - but the stairs were not to be negotiated in high heels or by anyone with vertigo.

As for the musical itself - it was different, outrageously offensive, full of blasphemy, very funny and we loved it! We rarely stopped laughing at this daring comedy with many useful pointers to religion and left with a much deeper understanding of Mormonism. Unless you’re very broadminded, it could be mistaken for a hoax – a sort of Emperor’s New Clothes. It would be easy to be offended but it was much easier to laugh.

Visitors must be very broad minded to enjoy (or otherwise endure) this adult musical. Book of Mormon mocks Mormons, all other religions, most other musicals (especially Lion King) and just about everything it can get its hands on. Jokes and songs about rape, Ugandan warlords and female circumcision make you both laugh and catch your breath when sung live in front of you.

Technically, the show was superb with great ensemble pieces and good old fashioned choreography. The leads parts played by Jared Gertner and Gavin Creel were excellent, as was Alexia Khadime as the eager to be converted Ugandan - although some of her lyrics were lost maybe due to her very strong African accent or more likely the audience laughing. There was also a great cameo from Chris Jammau as the warlord leader. Our favourite songs were ‘Hello’ (with so many teeth!) and ‘Switch It Off’.

It was a funny and lightweight musical comedy and thought-provoking too. Recommended for all broadminded adult groups.

Lordship Theatregoers.
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I went to see 'The Book of Mormon' last night (8th April 2013) and was sat in the Stalls in seat M31.

The Prince of Wales is a truly beautiful theatre and definitely worth turning up earlier to have a look around. It looks far larger in images but I felt it to be very intimate when I arrived. I could see the entire stage clearly although the top of the arch is cut off by the overhang. You do miss the angel on top of the arch when it lights up but that was very minor. Overall a fantastic and comfortable seat to enjoy the show from.

The show itself was brilliant! It was so great to see an original story and original music in one show. The incredibly slick production and music resemble a traditional musical, the story and words don't, which make it an interesting coupling. I didn't particularly mind the humour, probably because I'm used to the work of Mr Stone and Mr Parker, but it did manage to shock me a few times, not that I mind one bit! There's no need for overly complex sets and special effects to keep your interest when the book and music is that good. Yet there's enough eye candy that you'd expect from a Broadway show. I assure you if you can see past the expletives you'll see there's a warm heart there too.

I was quite surprised to see Elder Price isn't quite the lead of the show, I felt Elder Cunningham was really the lead character, although I know they're a pair being the leads together. The entire cast was full of energy and gave a fantastic performance in all respects.

I'm full of praise for this show.
____________________________________________________

8th April 2013.

Circle A11, 12 and 13.

The most hyped up show in recent times has landed at the Prince of Wales and does it live up to it all?

Well yes and no. I think they have gone for shock value more than anything else and to squeeze in as many rude songs as possible in the 2.5 hours.

I did think it was hugely entertaining but the hype has got the better of it as I was expecting something exceptional.

There are some truly laugh out loud moments but a couple of cringeworthy ones too. The whole 'raping my baby' references are just not funny and really mar the production - I feel they could of done something else. It didn't raise a titter the night I was there.

'Hello,' 'Switch it off' and 'Mormon Hell Dream' were my favourite parts.

Not a lot else to say. Good show but not the best I've seen.

The seats we had were very good, slightly to the side and very good legroom I thought.

Graham (West Berkshire's most feared critic) (formerly Oxfordshires most feared critic but I've moved..lol)
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For the first time ever we have to queue to get in to the theatre even though we have tickets, so there is no chance to have another swift one or order the interval drinks. The audience are pumped from all the hype marketing and ready to have a good time. And it starts with a bang – a classic musical theatre number which could have been on Glee, sung by an All-American group of trainee Mormons who are sharp, and energetic and funny.

The Odd Couple (Top of the Class and the lovable, prone-to-fabrication Dork) are sent to Uganda to convert the locals. Cue Lion-King parodies, more sharp choreography, and an abandonment at my concerns as to whether I would be uncomfortable with the racial stereotyping as the script mocks everyone and includes a self awareness that relaxes me.

I adored the tap dancing number of the Mormon team – and their leader was wonderfully camp and engaging whilst denying his homosexual feelings (“Turn it Off”).

And I did enjoy it. But it wasn’t as out there as I’d thought it was going to be. Nowhere near as surprising as Jerry Springer The Opera, and the music pretty predictable (but easy on the ear for that too). Yes, there is repeated reference to female circumcision, baby rape, fucking frogs. But basically it’s toilet humour. Which is amusing, but didn’t have me rolling. But the dancing is spot on if you like some good hoofing.

Performances all round are really good although the main female’s speaking voice did my head in. On the plus side there aren’t many other musicals that have a song called “F*** you G*d in the mouth, a** and c***.”

Three and a half stars. (Note it got a standing ovation so yet again I am a harder task master than most!).

29th May 2013.
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We entered the lottery and we were the last ticket pulled out!! For one ticket!! So my partner had to ditch!! So we queued for returns and at about 1.45pm when we were just about to give up we got returns on row J in the circle which although cramped, we had a great view. We enjoyed the show but glad we only spent £37.50 on the tickets!!
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Saturday night, 23rd November 2013, was Book of Mormon (again).

Sorry, but the Broadway production is a bit more brilliant, though the wide proscenium and modern theater interior lends itself well to the “up close” feeling (and seat comfort), given the price. However, I enjoyed the performance more than I did, when I saw it in London last month.

It was the same cast – on the stage, but the audience this time was much more lively, if not explosive with instant and demonstrable reactions to everything on the stage. It’s been said that the audience is an important member of the cast. That was quite apparent on Saturday night.

A couple of flubbed lines and a­bit of stage litter (my term), but, other than that, the show continues to be flawless, on either side of the Atlantic.
_______________________________________________________

Absolutely fantastic show on New Year's Eve 2013.

Sat in stalls D31/32/33. Premium seats and prices but felt worth it. Lots of legroom and even with a very tall bloke in seat in front able to see all parts of the stage. Excellent viewing angles on whole show.

Gerry.
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As Irving Berlin so aptly put it: THERE’S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS! How could something as good as 'THE FULL MONTY' close in the West End after just a few weeks, while a show as meretricious and downright horrible as 'THE BOOK OF MORMON' be such a success and attract such critical praise as well as audience approval? It certainly failed to please me at any level, apart from appreciating the efforts of the hard-working cast.

I am not easily shocked or offended by blasphemy or coarse language when the material is of some quality, as with the wonderful 'Jerry Springer – The Opera,' but I found much of the subject matter here repulsively unattractive. And I guess I was not in the mood to be entertained by the countless references to other musicals and to contemporary events and celebrities. I found them all somewhat irrelevant to what the show itself was about, which in itself I failed to relate to.

Now had the show been lampooning Islam …!!! I rather fear my theatre-going days are ending and 'THE BOOK OF MORMON' has done nothing to halt the termination.
_______________________________________________________

We finally got round to seeing this at the weekend, 17th May 2014.

We sat in stalls J2 and 3. Which, despite what they tell you at the box office, do not have a clear and uninterrupted view of the stage. You do lose quite a bit of the right hand side. Being a dedicated box user it did not bother me, but the people behind us were not happy. The leg room is excellent though, and I was served ice cream in my seat, can't complain about that.

I tend to avoid the really hyped shows as they rarely live up to the hype, but, I am always willing to admit to being wrong. Yes it is blasphemous, and a bit puerile in places, if I wanted to I could have been very offended. However, I am quite happy to take it at the level at which I believe it is intended to be taken.. The smile never left my face, and I laughed like a drain for a good part of the performance. It is fresh, different, and very entertaining, and in many ways so very truthful. Elder Price's twin has knocked on my door many times.

 They deserve every award that they won.


 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Performance Schedule:
The monkey advises checking performance times on your tickets and that performances are happening as scheduled, before travelling.

Monday to Saturday at 7.30pm
Wednesday and Saturday at 2.30pm and 7.30pm
 


Runs 2 hours 30 minutes approximately.

 

Ticket Prices:
View this information in diagram form.



Stalls
Centre block rows B to R: £72.50 except:
"Premium Seats" row E 27 to 32, F 14 to 33, G 13 to 34, H 15 to 33: £125 or £150
Centre block rows S and T: £47.50
Side block rows J to M, plus N 8 to 12 and 37 to 43: £72.50
Row N 2 to 5, 44 to 47; O 2 to 9, 39 to 46; P 2 to 9, 40 to 47; R 10, 11, 39, 40; S 9, 10, 39, 40; T 9, 10: £47.50
Row R 3 to 9, 41 to 47; S 2 to 8, 41 to 46; T 3 to 8: £37.50

Dress Circle
Centre block rows C to K: £72.50
"Premium seats" row A 16 to 31 and B 15 to 31: £125 or £150
row L: £47.50
Side blocks rows A to E: £72.50 except
"restricted view" row B 42 and 43: £47.50
Row F 2 to 12 and 34 to 44, plus G 11, 12, 35, 36; H 10, 11, 35, 36; J 10, 11, 36, 37; K 9, 10, 36, 37: £47.50
All other seats in side block rows G to L: £37.50

A "sub-prime" premium price of £95 may also be applied to seats not quite good enough for full "premium" pricing, that are left over near the performance date.

This theatre uses "Dynamic Pricing" meaning that some seat prices may increase depending on demand for a particular performance.


"Day Seats": A 'lucky draw lottery' will be held for 21 (often stalls row A - but changable at venue discretion) tickets before each performance. At 5pm each evening / Noon for afternoon performances, personal callers at the venue box office can enter their names for the right to buy up to 2 tickets for £20 each.
Entries will close at 5.30pm / 12.30pm and a draw will take place at that time. Only ONE entry is allowed per person - this will be checked and multiple applications mean disqualification.
Winners must be present when results are announced, bring valid ID with them and pay by cash or credit card. This draw is subject to availability.

www.bookofmormonlondon.com/tickets has updates on the latest availability of normal tickets, including information on returns and ticket releases.




Ticket price includes a £1 per ticket contribution towards refurbishment of Cameron Mackintosh / Delfont Mackintosh venues.
 

 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Buying Tickets Online:

Other Box Office Information

Tickets offered differ between outlets. Outlets also may offer different seats via their phone and online systems. Offers may be available click here.
Theatre Box Office:
www.delfontmackintosh.co.uk provide their own service for this theatre.
This system allows you to select your own seat numbers.

Booking fees per ticket for online bookings:
£2.25 per ticket - 25p less than  by phone. "Hasa Diga Eebowai" thinks the monkey, who had to work that joke in somewhere...

No booking fee for bookings made more than 12 weeks in advance at www.delfontmackintosh.co.uk. Free ticket exchange up to 2 weeks before the show is also included in this deal.
 

Other Online Choices (with S.T.A.R. genuine ticket agencies):

When the theatre does not have the tickets you desire available, it is well worth trying the Theatremonkey Ticketshop agency, which offers £72.50 tickets with an £11.50 (£17 Friday and Saturday) per seat booking fee (£18.75 on £125 seats)  - moderate by agency standards, though higher than box office fees, worth trying as they often have a choice of seats available! Note that this system will confirm exact seat numbers prior to purchase. A £1.95 per booking, not per ticket, handling fee may apply on some transactions by telephone. NO handling fee applies for online purchases.

Another alternative is www.seetickets.com / telephone 0870 830 0200 which offers £72.50 seats with an £7.25 per ticket booking fee (£7.13 on £47.50, £5.63 on £37.50 seats) Monday to Thursday "off peak" performances / £72.50 seats with an £10.88 per ticket booking fee (£11.88 on £47.50, £9.38 on £37.50 seats) Friday and Saturday and "peak" performances; and £2.75 per booking (not per ticket) postal charge. (FREE call if using BT.com Calling Plan at your chosen times).

www.ticketmaster.co.uk £72.50 seats attract a £7.60 fee (£20 on £150, £17.50 on £125, £11.50 on £95, £4.75 on £47.50, £3.75 on £37.50 seats Monday to Friday / £20 on £150, £17.50 on £125, £11.50 on £95, £10 on £72.50, £5.75 on £47.50, £4.50 on £37.50 Saturday seats). An extra £2.85 per booking (not per ticket) service charge is also made. This system allows you to choose your own seats from the selection the company has available.

Encore Tickets (telephone 0207 400 1253 / 0044 207 400 1253 if calling from outside the United Kingdom) offer £72.50 seats with an £19.50 booking fee per ticket (£33 on £125, £12.50 on £47.50, £12.50 on £37.50 seats. A postage charge of £2.25 per booking, not per ticket may be applied to bookings made from UK addresses more than 5 days before the performance. The "Flexiticket" Exchange Service, allowing FREE transfer / cancellation (credit note up to 12 months) of your booking up to 3 days before the performance is also available for £2.50 per ticket. Meal and show packages may also be available. Quality and Value hotel / theatre ticket packages are also available.

Lastminute.com offer £72.50 seats with a £10 per ticket booking fee (£13 on £125, £7 on £47.50, £4 on £37.50 seats Monday to Thursday / £18 on £125, £13.50 on £72.50, £9.50 on £47.50, £7.50 on £37.50 seats Friday and Saturday). NOTE: Seat numbers are NOT available in advance from this company. All seats booked in the same price group will, of course, be together or at the very least be in front or behind each other in the theatre. In the very unlikely event of this not being possible this company will call you and give you the option of cancelling your booking. However if booking in two or more price bands, you will not be sat together. Please DO NOT purchase if this is unacceptable to you, as all tickets are sold subject to this condition. "Meal and Show" packages may also be available. Quality and Value
hotel / theatre ticket packages are also available.

Londontheatredirect.com offer £72.50 seats with a £12 (£10 on £47.50 seats) booking fee per ticket.
Collecting tickets from the box office before your performance is free, OR, if required and time allows, there is a postage charge option of of £2.95 (£4.95 to non-UK addresses) per booking, not per ticket applies to all bookings. Optional Ticket Insurance is also available. Discounts and Meal and Show Packages may also be available.

Shows In London (telephone 0871 976 0074) offer £72.50 seats with a £12.50 booking fee per ticket.

ALSO SEE Tickettree.com for great value "hotel and theatre ticket" packages.

Other Independent S.T.A.R. ticket agencies may also offer an alternative choice of seats.


 

Box Office Information:
Tickets offered differ between outlets. Outlets also may offer different seats via their phone and online systems. Offers may be available click here.
Theatre Box Office:
Telephone: 0844 482 5115
(020 7812 7498 if you cannot use the 0844 number)
Operated by Delfont-Mackintosh Theatres. At busy times / outside working hours - 9am to 8pm, See Tickets may answer on behalf of the venue.

Booking fees per ticket for telephone bookings:
£2.50 per ticket - 25p more than online. "Hasa Diga Eebowai" thinks the monkey, who had to work that joke in somewhere...

No booking fee for bookings made more than 12 weeks in advance on 0844 482 5115. Free ticket exchange up to 2 weeks before the show is also included in this deal.

 

For personal callers or by post: Coventry Street, London. W1D 6AS
No booking fee for personal callers. By post the usual £1.75 per ticket booking fee applies.

Special Access Needs Customers:
Wheelchair users and other registered disabled theatregoers can book their seats on 0844 482 5137 and enquire about concessionary prices that may be available to them. The wheelchair users line connects directly to the Delfont-Mackintosh Theatre Group Helpline in London. See Notes.

www.delfontmackintosh.co.uk is the official theatre website.

www.mamma-mia.com is the official show website. Booking is through Delfont-Mackintosh.com as above.

 

 
 
Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Theatre Seat Opinions:
Please remember that cheaper seats often do not offer the same view / location quality as top price ones, and that ticket prices are designed to reflect this difference.

Pictured: New Prince of Wales Auditorium 
Copyright: Cameron Mackintosh Ltd 

The theatre is actually much more beautiful than this "artist's impression". Sir Cameron Mackintosh has really excelled himself with the transformation - the monkey salutes him and the team who designed and constructed the venue, which resembles the interior of a very plush ocean liner - welcoming and comfortable. Visitor opinions are most welcome - contact us

Arrive early to look at the foyers. A fabulous sculpture of the theatre is in the main entrance hall - commemorating the re-opening. Scattered around the rest of the public areas are posters of previous successful shows and art-deco mirrors and sculptures, all worth a look. Foyers open at 6.45pm for evening performances.

A good auditorium photograph is also available at: http://www.flickr.co...38490/lightbox/ 

 

Seating Plan Diagram

Stalls Dress Circle Notes
STALLS 

Layout:
A large central block of seats, with two smaller "islands" about half way back. These "islands" are cut off from the central block by aisles.

The Dress Circle overhangs the stalls at row E. It begins to remove the top of the stage at row N, and by row T, around three fifths of the stage are not visible - the top in particular is missed.

The rake (sloped floor to help see over rows in front) becomes noticeable at row H, and is nicely steep from there to the back of the auditorium.

Seats are quite well "staggered" to enable those in the rear rows to see around others in front of them.

Behind T11 is a "flip up" seat for ushers. No, you can't use it. End of story, sorry, says the monkey.
 

Legroom:
Comfortable for all but the very tallest in most seats - best in row A and J 3 to 13 and 34 to 44 which have aisles / extra space in front.

Row K seat 2 has a small space in front of the right quarter of it, but a poor view - one for a tall, non-theatre fan, to consider, perhaps!

Row T 16 to 21 has tight legroom - a 5ft 7 monkey had knees against the seat in front by the time the numbering hit 18... and 21 in particular is cramped.

All the seats are a little wider than other theatre seats too, which should mean slightly more comfortable accommodation for many.

Choosing Seats in General:
Centre Block:
Rows A to G curve around the front of the stage. The front row is at about nose level to the stage for those over 5ft 5, estimates the monkey.

When present, row BB is a short row curved in front of the stage. The stage then is very low, so there's no looking up at the performers.

The monkey felt that prime seats in the central block are in rows E to J, numbers 15 to 33. It would take F first, then E or G, then H and J.

Beyond this it would pick, in the central block seats, rows D or K first, then C, then L back in alphabetical order. Ends of rows from AA back to G are also acceptable after this. It would, though, pick the central block of the Dress Circle, rows A to D (with a few exceptions) over the stalls, for its own preference.

In rows O to S the overhang is noticeable, though the ceiling above is stunning to look at. Not much stage action is missed here, but you could still do better in the monkey opinion. Monkey opinion is that O is fair value, row P too expensive when it is at top price.

When cheaper, row R is acceptable at lower prices, though before accepting any seat in rows P to S, go for row K in the Dress Circle instead - this row is the same price, but with a better view in the monkey opinion!

A sound desk may disturb a few in R21 to 28, but most will not notice. Seats in rows S and T will be aware of the wall beside them, but it isn't intruding directly into the view. Only T29 will notice lights from the desk particularly - leaning out or around fixes that problem.

Row T seats 38 and 39 can be removed for a wheelchair user. Take these before the other wheelchair spaces in row S seats 39 to 45, feels the monkey.


Side Blocks:
These are a real mixture, feels the monkey. The further back you go, the better the overall view of the stage.
Row J has the most legroom, with nothing in front.

The first and last two seats in row J may miss seeing action in the rear corners of the stage. Seats J 2, 3, 4, 43 and 44 and K 2, 3, 45 and 46 have been reduced in price to allow for this problem...the monkey still says avoid - it is worth paying the extra few pounds for a much better view, in its opinion.

Moving backwards, at top price in rows K to N things are adequate near the centre aisle - a full view of the stage.

As you move about five or six seats off the centre aisle, towards the edges of the venue, the view diminishes rather noticeably for a top price seat.

Seats more than four off the aisle in K to M at top price, plus top price J 8, 9 and 36 to 39 (and the 3 seats at the ends of row J, except if legroom is required) are worth a miss. It would also avoid the outermost 4 in row K too.

The boxes overhang, outermost side stalls, and the monkey would take cheaper seats in the Dress Circle before sitting here.
In the back corners all seats are always far cheaper. Not a bad bet, feels the monkey. The circle ones at the same price edge them for view, but the stalls may feel closer and have more legroom, it thinks.

General Hazard Notes:
Claustrophobics should note that there is no aisle at the extreme ends of the rows in the side blocks.
Boxes overhang outermost side block seats.

A sound desk may disturb a few in R21 to 28, but most will not notice. Seats in rows S and T will be aware of the wall beside them, but it isn't intruding directly into the view. Only T29 will notice lights from the desk particularly - leaning out or around fixes that problem.

Row S 39 to 46 has a corridor leading to the foyer exit behind it - not a distraction, but something to know, felt the monkey.

Changes for the current production:
Row A is the front row. The stage is very low, the conductor pretty much out of view - though the keyboard player is in front of A 24 to 28. Seats in row A are pretty good, even the outermost two look towards centre stage. A reader noted the "low numbers" first few seats are noisier (nearer the percussion side of the band) than the other end of the row.

Central rows F to H, plus part of row G are "premium" priced. Your call, feels the monkey, who notes that the elders have left plenty of decent seats nearby - look at the "non premium" stuff in rows E and J between 15 and 33 first. This theatre also uses "Dynamic Pricing" meaning that some nearby seat prices may increase depending on demand for a particular performance. The monkey considers that a "Green" seat would become "Light Green" if the price becomes "premium."

A "sub-prime" premium price of £95 may also be applied to seats not quite good enough for full "premium" pricing, that are left over near the performance date.

Elsewhere in the centre block, top price goes back a long way - perhaps take central rows P and R last for that money. From row H to K you will struggle to see the angel on the proscenium "light up" at the start of each act - and it's not visible beyond that row at all. Minor, but bear in mind if paying "premium" price to see the WHOLE show.

In the side blocks, the monkey would skip the outermost 3 seats in row J and 4 in K. A long way off to the side at top price, it feels.

Some inventive pricing produces bargain second price seats in row O back. Just 2 seats away from the aisle, rows O and P 6 to 9, O 39 to 42 and P 40 to 42 are worth fighting for - decent view and comfortable compared to similarly priced circle seats. Behind them, the 2 aisle seats on rows S and T at the same price are also a very good deal, the monkey thinks. Do also have a glance at circle row F seats too - aisle seats there are worth a look, but no further out.

At third price, the seats 2 off the aisle in rows S and T on the "low numbers" side are again a great choice. On the "high numbers" side, if you can tolerate a little noise from the corridor behind the seats, again, worth a look.

Seats added around the sound desk all have clear views, no desk corner in view; but T21 sees a 5ft 7 person with knees touching the seat in front. Take S28 then S21 then T29 then T21 in that order. The other three seats have more legroom (those in S have most). Row S also has the very best views of these seats and T29 gets the most of the desk lights - but is still more comfortable than T21.

 

Reader Comments:
"Mamma Mia": (Lizzie Loves the Theatre). Seats were right at side of sound box but no problem and plenty of room to get up and have a jig about as only one row behind us. All the stalls seats seemed to be pretty good for views."

“Mamma Mia”: (Barry Liimakka). "We've experienced Mamma Mia from many different vantage points. As TM suggests, Stalls L10/11 are wonderful seats providing good vantage and good acoustics & one need only sit back and take it all in. Likewise TM correctly cautions about Stalls D9 which is a stage left seat in a musical which tends to run stage right. Thus one feels a bit removed from the action at times. Sight lines are sometimes obscured by ensemble cast as well. Be forewarned about proximity to the speakers. You'll adjust during the performance, but during the encore numbers, the volume is all the way up and your eardrums will pop.

Our favourite seats were Stalls B 33/34. These seats are mesmerizing as the actors are so close and you feel the energy of the performance in an entirely different manner. Act II's dream scene is surreal as fog wafts off of the stage onto your lap. It's from these seats that we discover the powerful chemistry between Ms. Parry and Ragavelas during the wedding gown scene."

"A26: "The Book of Mormon" (March 2013). Tried my luck 3 times before actually winning it!! Saturday matinee seemed like a good time for this since there were obviously fewer people at the lottery. Our names were called out first so we got the most central seats in the first row. Views were great, no restriction at all. However, it might be better to go a little to the left or right to see everything a bit clearer *SPOILER ALERT* as most stage blockings will put 2 characters in front of each other on different level stages so it was hard for me to see the hobbits and Joseph Smith among other funny characters that would pop up in the show *SPOILER ENDS* As there's a big gap between the orchestra pit and the row A, leg room was excellent."

"B24 and B25: "Let It Be," (Michael). Were excellent seats (even comfortable!) and off set against the rows in front. For this show there is an AA and BB row putting us on the 4th row. Interestingly, the 2nd row had only 3 sat at one end and 2 at the other. The other seats empty. May be patrons are out off by height of stage reports and too close for neck comfort? But fear not, if you want to be close up and personal. Those on the front row sat with shoulders above stage level.”

"C 24 and 25: “Mamma Mia”. When seated there, you are totally in the action! The bandleader/conductor is directly in front of you but that's no problem at all. Beware of daydreaming because actors may look at you at several times during the show! What you can't see from there are the floor lighting effects at the end of act 1, but if you do not know they are there you won't miss them! The sound experience is on a high level, crystal clear - but the voices are sometimes a little bit too gentle in comparison with the band. If you get one of those seats for a fair offer, do not hesitate - and enjoy a delightful night in Greece!"

“D9 to 17: “Mamma Mia”. The view was fantastic and the seats were very comfortable - it was good to see the expressions on the faces of the cast. No neck ache in these rows despite being 4 rows from the front. There was a hen party in the first row (A) and throughout the show they put the smoke machine on and it completely covered them all in row A they couldn't see a thing !! It went back as far as row B/C but we were lucky in Row D. You couldn't see them in row A with the smoke !! So row A is not a good bet for this show!!"

"D17 and D18: “Mamma Mia”. Very close to the action and you can see faces and expressions etc but I think two or three rows further back might have been better."

"D31, 32 and 33: "Book of Mormon" (March 2013). Premium seats and prices but felt worth it. Lots of legroom and even with a very tall bloke in seat in front able to see all parts of the stage. Excellent viewing angles on whole show."

"E14: "The Book of Mormon" (March 2013). I would say for this show the best seats are the front centre stalls up to around half way back. I wouldn't want to be much further away or upstairs, I think you wouldn't feel as involved. I was in E14 and that was a pretty much perfect seat with a ton of legroom. Technically the sound was great, I had read comments from people missing too many lyrics from the front stalls but they must have corrected this over first few previews. The staff at the theatre are amazingly friendly as well, from the lady who excitedly told me I had great seats to the ushers inside."

"H19, 20 and 21: "Mamma Mia”, (Richard Bradbury). Excellent seats - I doubt you would get a better view in all of the stalls."

"H 25: “Mamma Mia”. Provided a great view. I would have happily paid full price (I paid £30). The seats in this theatre really are very comfortable."

"J2 and 3: "The Book of Mormon" (March 2014). Despite what they tell you at the box office, these do not have a clear and uninterrupted view of the stage. You do lose quite a bit of the right hand side. Being a dedicated box user it did not bother me, but the people behind us were not happy. The leg room is excellent though, and I was served ice cream in my seat, can't complain about that."

"J26: “Mamma Mia”. I paid £35 for my ticket through the Get Into London Theatre promotion in January 2012. I'm 6ft tall and felt I had rather good leg room in J26 (being able to tuck my feet under the seat in front always helps). The stagnation of seats between row I and row J was excellent and which meant that the poor rake wasn't an issue as it was easy to get a clear view. The overhang also is not an issue. Overall, an excellent seat and I'd happily sit here again."

"K14: "Book of Mormon" (March 2013). This was the end of the aisle. A perfect view of the stage, although the very top was missing. Apparently this means I missed a spinning statue of Jesus or something like that at the start of each act but if that’s all I'm not complaining. It felt close enough to the stage to feel involved in the action, but far enough away to take everything in. With this show, there is so much going on on stage I think this was an advantage. I think the Prince Of Wales is probably the most generous London theatre I have been in for legroom, and even at 6' 5" I felt that there was plenty of room. If only other theatres could have the same money spent on them to help improve this situation."

"K18 and 19: “Mamma Mia”, (James – regular reader). No problem with the view here, although there was no-one directly in front of me which helped. Sound is fine here too."

"K 35: "Mamma Mia". A great seat on the aisle, just off the centre block. This provided a great view of all the action on the stage; it was just under the overhang of the circle but nothing was missed. I would have happily paid full price (I paid £30). The seats in this theatre really are very comfortable.

"M31: "Book of Mormon" (March 2013). The theatre looks far larger in images but I felt it to be very intimate when I arrived. I could see the entire stage clearly although the top of the arch is cut off by the overhang. You do miss the angel on top of the arch when it lights up but that was very minor. Overall a fantastic and comfortable seat to enjoy the show from."

"O12: “Mamma Mia”. The view was surprisingly good, there was a reasonable rake, and you felt a lot closer to the stage than 'O' might otherwise suggest. The only downside was that because it's an aisle seat, there's an overhead aisle light that shines distractingly in your eyes when the house lights are dimmed. In fact, many of the aisle seats in this area are disconcertingly illuminated whilst the rest of the house is in darkness, making you feel slightly exposed."



DRESS CIRCLE 

Layout:
This is split into three blocks by two central aisles.

A good rake ensures a good view for most of the rest of the centre block. This rake can make the circle feel steep, however.

Legroom:
High backed, deep seats mean that legroom is improved as much through posture as actual space. Monkey does note that the flat backs preclude stretching spaces between them for the taller jungle dweller.

Row A has the most legroom with centre block B to G acceptable to all but the tallest, feels the monkey.

From row H back in the centre, and side block row E, legroom gets much tighter. The tallest would probably find the side block seats of rows E back to L particularly uncomfortable.

Side block seats B 32 to 41 have less legroom due to a quirk in row layout - the seats have been bolted too far back in row A, taking legroom off for those behind.

Row B 41 to 43 and E3 have more legroom with an aisle in front, but the boxes affect the view from E3, and you look through bars in the row B seats.

Choosing Seats in General:
Centre Block:
Very small people may just have a problem seeing over the bar in row A, as it overhangs inwards slightly, but other adults will find the low front wall and unhindered sightlines a refreshing change. Amusingly, the overhang of the bar made the monkey feel it had been "tucked in" for the performance!

All the way back to row F in the centre block are some of the finest views to be had in this theatre, feels the monkey.

Rows G and H are very fair value too - the stage seems close from them, and the lack of overhang allows you to see all of it.

If row J is top price then go a row back and try centre row K instead... or (where applicable) the even cheaper centre row L. While a little further away, the monkey feels that second / third price reflects the view very well indeed, and it would pick these over some of the top priced seats in the rear stalls, for it's own tastes, as it can see the whole stage without an overhang intruding. Even with row L the same price as K, it feels most won't be disappointed.

Side Blocks:
These are well focused on the stage.

The first and last few seats in each row may miss a sliver of action at the extreme edges of the stage - like the front stalls, though, the monkey mentions this more for information than the detraction from enjoyment. Those seeking a full view should avoid these seats of course, for the rest, many will tolerate them - and you get a nice discount in some seats to make up for it anyway. Still, try for the centre block for the same money, is the advice.

At second price seats just off the aisle are fair value, those further out are also fair but be aware the angle to the stage is the reason for any being a little cheaper. Also be aware of bars in the views of B42 and 43.

Rows K and L at the sides feel a bit "shelf like" to the monkey. Still fair and the monkey likes K 5 to 10 and 26 to 41 and L 9 to 11 and 35 and 36.

General Hazard Notes:
Double height bars protect the ends of all aisles.

The rail in front of row A is quite high.

The box office do feel the rear circle can seem a little steep, so the very nervous may like the stalls better - everyone else should be very happy here, though.

At the sides of the theatre, safety bars are well to the side of anyone's vision, and won't intrude, except into the view of B43, and slightly lesser extent B42. The bars are long horizontal structures, with a downward pole at the end, so the effect is like looking through open window blinds. In the central aisles, the monkey originally felt their presence will probably deeply annoy those seated either side of the aisles in rows A to F. Seats A 15, 16, 31, 32 particularly.

Claustrophobics should also be aware that from row F back, there is no aisle at the extreme ends of rows.

The steep stairs are treacherous for ladies in stilettos... and entry to the auditorium is usually from the very top of the theatre behind row L. In this case, or if disliking heights, ask to be let in via a door beside row B43.

Changes for the current production:
Seats in centre block rows A and B are "premium" priced - your call if you want to pay a little more, feels the monkey. This theatre uses "Dynamic Pricing" meaning that some nearby seat prices may increase depending on demand for a particular performance. The monkey considers that a "Green" seat would become "Light Green" if the price becomes "premium," and an aisle "white" seat would become "red" because (as a reader notes) the aisle rail is in view, and you wouldn't expect that for a ticket costing that much...

A "sub-prime" premium price of £95 may also be applied to seats not quite good enough for full "premium" pricing, that are left over near the performance date.

Other centre block seats back to row H are an excellent top price choice. J is about fair, but K is overpriced - take L at second price instead for a cheaper version of the same view.

In the side blocks, the outermost seats in rows A to E are expensive at top price, feels the monkey.

Restricted view seats B 42 and 43 are worth a look for legroom and a cheaper way to be close to the front, if you don't mind a LOT of bars in the way.

Second price aisle seats in rows G to J sit well with the monkey. Good view for the price, it thinks.

Next to these, the third price seats begin. Try for the 6 closest to the aisle first, going a row back until you reach row J, rather than outwards until you can get something good. The monkey feels that nearer aisle seats in J, for example, beat outermost seats in G are less claustrophobic and have a better angle on the action, it would say. Legroom is better in the same price stalls, though.

Row L 11 and 35 are also a decent aisle seat choice at third price.

 

Reader Comments:
“A 11, 12 and 13: "The Book of Mormon" (March 2013), (Graham). The seats we had were very good, slightly to the side and very good legroom I thought."

"A16: “Mamma Mia”, (Janet Morris). My husband bought us tickets earlier this year, we hoped they may have been reduced but he ended up paying £49 each. You can imagine my horror when one of the seats came up as RED on your seating plan, circle A16 but I had no need to worry the seats were fantastic for "Mamma Mia. (Since then, other readers felt the same - as do the venue - and the monkey re-checked them. From B14 and 32, it noted that you do have to peer around them somewhat. Based on both this and reader feedback, other ratings have been raised accordingly).”

"A 32 to 34: "The Book of Mormon" (March 2013). I purchased 3 Premium seats in the Dress Circle. Row A seats 32 to 34. 33 and 34 were fine but, as your website points out, the view from seat 32 is obscured by the handrail. (I only read this afterwards). I understand why they need a handrail but I don't think it is fair that they sell this seat at a premium price. In my opinion a premium seat should be one of the best seats in the house and NOT partially obscured."

"B13: "The Book of Mormon" (March 2013). Safety rail very slightly obscured the view of the front of stage. Theatre was very warm."

"B28 and 29: “Mamma Mia”. Brilliant view and comfortable too !"

“B 29 and 30: “Mamma Mia”. I'm not a fan of dress circle or balcony seats, and love to be as close to the action as possible - but the box office man promised us that these are one of the best places - and these were only £35 each. The steps down to dress circle seats are very cliffy, and if you are not free from giddiness / vertigo be sure that you can grab someone's hand for your way down. On the left hand side is a guard rail and, if seated in seat 31, it might restrict your view slightly - but in seat 30 it won't harm you in any way. You are really close to the stage action and you get a wonderful overview. The sound is great; voices are crystal clear, with very good sound mix. The whole sound experience is much louder than in the stalls. No loss of emotions or anything like that. If I'm going to see the show again I'd love to get these circle seats again. I'm always looking for something in the stalls, but after that night at the Prince Of Wales, I'm in love with their dress circle. Never before was a show attendance from upstairs so moving! Gratitude to the box office member for his advice, it’s good to deal with people who know what they are selling!"

"C5 and 6: “Mamma Mia (May 2012), (Chris B). Slightly to the side and classed as the second price tier, these seats are gems! You can see the whole stage with no restrictions and as it is a wide stage there is plenty to see. There is more than ample legroom which is an added bonus. There is no circle above either so it feels very airy and roomy. There is a good sized rake so no annoying heads in front to peer over either."

“D 15 and 16: “Mamma Mia”, (Jenny). The safety bar on the circle edge didn't bother me and I am only 5' 2" tall, so no probs whatsoever, although the comment about the rake of the seating is true, the one thing you can't do in the circle seats, even if you are on the end of the row, is get up and dance at the end - next time I will sit in the stalls!"

"D15, 16 and 17: “Mamma Mia”, (Mila and children). Great seats. The circle really is the best place to see this show as the rake is so high and steep that even if you have tall people in front of you (which we did) the kids can see everything, and it’s a great overview of the whole stage. Plenty of people got up and danced at the end too (including me, as I like to embarrass the children!!) so I don't think we missed anything from not being in the stalls."

"D18 and 19: “Mamma Mia”. Had a perfect view of the stage."

"D37 to 41: “Mamma Mia” (Graham). Over to the side but not affecting the view of the stage. The seats were really comfortable too."

"Rows E, F and G: “Mamma Mia”. Were superb (for my coach party) as when you are sitting down as you could look over the head of the tallest person sitting in front of you. Getting down to your seat from the back would challenge anyone suffering from vertigo, though as it is a very steep rake. Having said that, the refurbishment of the whole theatre is quite spectacular and the seats very comfortable."

"Row F: “Mamma Mia” (Sharon Pestell). Right in the centre. These seats were fantastic. Although the circle at this theatre is pretty steep! It's a small theatre and I should think wherever you sat the view would be pretty good. Our seat afforded us a full view of the stage and you could still see the cast's faces."

"F31 to 35: “Mamma Mia”, (Mila). Excellent seats. We had a great view of the stage and the Circle has a good rake so our three nine-year-old kids were able to see perfectly."

“G15 and 16: “Mamma Mia”. Very good as reviewed on this site (thank you Monkey). The sound wasn’t balanced well at first, and the banker Dad was so soft you could barely hear him speak, but OK when singing. Worth mentioning again, the very steep rake of the Circle. Don’t wear platform shoes! I didn’t see anyone walk down facing forward. They all turned sideways. Ladies wearing high heels were the most nervous of all. However, I reiterate other comments that the new seating is very good and comfortable, and legroom, at least where we sat, good."

"G 25 and 26: "The Book of Mormon" (March 2013), (Lordship Theatregoers). In the centre block, not a seat we would normally book but found it excellent with plenty of legroom (6’1”). The upright, straight backed seats were very comfortable and there was a very steep rake which meant a great view - but the stairs were not to be negotiated in high heels or by anyone with vertigo."

"Row H: "The Book of Mormon" (March 2013). We were almost level with the top of the proscenium arch. Good view but VERY high up looking down on stage and very steep rake."

"H19, 20, 21, 22: “Mamma Mia”. Although I personally wouldn’t normally choose to sit this far back I was pleasantly surprised at the amazing view of the stage. I could see loads of detail and the sound was very good as well. In addition, the very steep rake of the seating (not great for high heeled shoe lovers) ensures clear views over heads in front of you. In terms of sightlines, this must be one of the best Dress Circles in the West End. The view from there front few rows must be even better. The Dress Circle bar is also wonderful with loads of room."

"Row J: "The Book of Mormon" (March 2013). Although cramped, we had a great view."

"L7 to 11: "Mamma Mia", (Pip). Being the very back row, the theatre has been built in such a way you can see everything like you were in the stalls! Every detail is perfect. Plus these seats are cheap and you feel almost in the middle! I would get them, very comfortable and lots of leg room. No need to worry about tall people in here!"



Dress Circle Boxes
called Loges in this theatre

Layout:
At the sides of the stage, these form four fabulous architectural features. Shining bars in front of them lend a streamlined look, in keeping with the "liner" theme.

Boxes 1 and 3 are tagged onto the side of the Dress Circle, between the edge of it, and the stage. Again, The view is poor if you don't lean forwards - about three fifths of the stage visible without.

Boxes 2 and 4 are VERY high up above the stage on an extremely narrow shelf.

In all boxes, seating consists of one upright chair (seat 4) and three comfortable, but low, saloon armchairs with "U" shaped backs and armrests.

Legroom:
Should be good, as movable chairs are used. The tall may find the seats a little low, however, and if you move your seat for the best view, the overall legroom available diminishes.

Choosing Seats in General:
Boxes 1 and 3 have poor views if you don't lean forwards - about three fifths of the stage visible without that lean, and legroom isn't great without upsetting your sightlines still further. Just about fair value for the view in the opinion of the producers... and the monkey about agrees with them if there are none of the great seats at the back of the circle available. At second price these reflect the fact you have a private box (according to some producers). The monkey isn't that keen on the view for the money, but accepts that privacy is worth paying for if you prefer to observe rather than participate when the crowd gets enthusiastic during a show.

Boxes 2 and 4 are VERY high up above the stage on an extremely narrow shelf - vertigo sufferers should REALLY avoid these - particularly seat 1 at the front, at all costs. The view is poor if you don't lean forwards - about a third of the stage visible without that lean, and legroom isn't great without pushing your chair back - which upsets your sightlines. Just about fair value for the view in the opinion of most producers... and the monkey about agrees with them if there are none of the great seats at the back of the circle available EXCEPT if you are a vertigo sufferer, in which case avoid at all costs. Prices mostly reflect the fact you have a private box (according to most producers). The monkey again isn't that keen on the view for the money, but also notes the privacy advantage. Might be worth a look at lower prices, feels the monkey.

General Hazard Notes:
Boxes 1 and 3 miss about two fifths of the stage if you don’t lean forward.

Boxes 2 and 4 miss around two thirds of the stage unless leaning.

Boxes 2 and 4 are VERY HIGH. Please DO NOT even consider purchasing if even slightly prone to vertigo.

Changes for the current production:
None.

Reader Comments:
None.



 

Notes
Total seats 1,125 for the current production.

Theatre is air-conditioned.

Hearing loop system available. Guide dogs can be dogsat. Wheelchair access is via the main foyer (automatic doors, controlled either by bell push on wall to the right as you face the theatre, or from the box office counter). Level access to the auditorium. Wheelchair spaces in row S are fitted with movable flooring to provide level space, regardless of the theatre's usual sloped floor - amazing, feels the monkey. Transfer is also available to seats C37 and 38, with a cubby-hole nearby for wheelchair storage.

Large unisex adapted toilet in stalls bar - a lift takes users downstairs to it.  

The "registered disabled" concessionary price policy here is generally (though can be subject to change) for a quota of accessible best seats to be made available at the lowest regular price charged. This quota is increased for designated performances such as signed / audio interpreted. Check with the box office at time of booking.

Fuller access details from  theatre group dedicated phoneline on 0844 482 5137, www.theatre-access.co.uk or Artsline on 020 7388 2227  e-mail artsline@dircon.co.uk. A "venue access guide" from the team who created book "Theatremonkey: A Guide to London's West End," is available to download in PDF format by clicking here.

Ice cream and confectionery in auditorium, Bar snacks also available.

Free Cloakroom on the lower floor for coats and baggage.

Two bars both huge and beautifully equipped. One below the Stalls, called the "Delfont", one in the Dress Circle called the "American." The "Delfont" has a huge range of drinks available, plus a stage where live entertainment could take place after the show. The "American" has floor to ceiling windows providing a novel view of the street below. Both have TV screens for latecomers to watch the show while waiting to be shown to their seats.

When the Delfont Bar is used for events, a reader notes,
"STANDING. Just a warning there is nowhere to really lean. If you lean on the bar you won't be able to see because more people will be standing in front of you - and, since the stage isn't raised, you will struggle. I stood behind the chairs on the left and had a good view, but again nowhere to lean - so back pain can happen!"
 

4 toilets; Stalls (off the Delfont Bar) 1 gents 3 cubicles, 1 ladies 13 cubicles; 1 unisex adapted disabled; Dress Circle (in the American Bar area) 1 gents 1 cubicle, 1 ladies 4 cubicles.

 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Getting to this Theatre
Find this theatre on a Street Map
Nearest Underground Station Buses Car Park
Nearest Underground Station:
Piccadilly Circus - Piccadilly (Dark Blue) and Bakerloo (Brown) lines.

The escalator from the platforms ends in a large circular underground area. 

After leaving the barriers, turn to your left, and follow the curve of the barriers around until you see an exit to your right with the sign "Subway 4" over it. Walk under this sign.

Walk through this tunnel and ignore the first staircase to your right, marked "Shaftesbury Avenue". Continue along the tunnel passing the "Trocadero" doors, and follow it as it curves round. Follow the arrow on the sign ahead of you that says "Eros" - it points on down the tunnel to your right. 

In this new section of tunnel, take the stairs ahead and to your right up to the street.

At the top of the stairs, the Criterion Theatre is to your immediate right. Look ahead and in the distance, to your right. The huge corner billboard the length of the building at first floor level is the Prince of Wales Theatre. Cross Haymarket (horse statue on your right as you do so) and walk towards the theatre.

 

Buses:
14,19,22 and 38 to Coventry Street. Get off at the Trocadero Centre. Look ahead to the right. The huge corner billboard the length of the building at first floor level is the Prince of Wales Theatre. Use the next pedestrian crossing to get back to the correct side of the road, pass TGI Fridays red and white adorned restaurant, cross Oxendon Street and voila!

 

Taxi:
A rank for Black taxis is at Charing Cross Station - a long distance from the theatre. Best chance of hailing one in the street is to walk down Coventry Street to Piccadilly Circus / Haymarket.

 

Car Park:
Whitcomb Street. Leave the car park, turn left and walk uphill, crossing Panton Street and Whitcomb Court. Keep going straight on until you come to Coventry Street in front of you. Turn to your left, the theatre is a few paces away on your left. Do not cross the road or pass McDonalds. Wrong way.

This car park does not participate in any cheap car park scheme. The nearest ones that do are Spring Gardens / Trafalgar Square and Newport Place, Chinatown. The "Theatreland Parking Scheme" may be available at these two. Call Q-Park car parks on 0870 442 0104 or see http://www.q-park.co.uk for details. At this car park, parking under the "Theatreland Parking Scheme" allows a 50% discount in cost. Spaces CANNOT be reserved at these prices, so choose whether you would prefer to book and pay more, or use this scheme.

If you choose the "Theatreland Parking Scheme", you must get your car park ticket validated at the theatre's box office counter (the theatre attendant will insert the car parking ticket into a small machine which updates the information held on the magnetic strip on the reverse, thus enabling the discount). When you pay using the machines at the car park, 50% will be deducted from the full tariff. You may park for up to 24 hours using this scheme and it is endorsed by the Society of London Theatre.

 

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