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Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

CAMBRIDGE THEATRE


            


MATILDA
(musical)
CONTAINS FLASHING LIGHTS AND LOUD EXPLOSIONS.
Audio-Described performance: 13th December 2014 at 2.30pm (touch tour 12.30pm)
Captioned performance: 14th December 2014 at 3pm.

One clever girl, two neglectful parents, one abusive headmistress and one idealistic young teacher. Roald Dahl weaves these into a story about revolting children...

The Royal Shakespeare Company hit show of 2010 transfers to London for a commercial run.

http://uk.matildathemusical.com/ is the official show website.


BOOSTERZ™ Inflatable Booster Cushions are now available to borrow at this theatre. Raising a child 10 to 14 cm, this easily inflated - by pump or pure 'puff power' - item can be loaned from ushers at the venue (who will supply it ready inflated!). For regular theatregoers, they can also be purchased direct from the inventors at www.boosterz.co.uk, and the more you buy, the greater the discount!

 

 

Theatremonkey Opinion:

(reviewed at the preview performance on 3rd November 2011). Some performers have now left the production.

Lyricist Tim Rice once said that the best musicals are the shortest. “Matilda the Musical” proves his instinct right. A feisty, slim children’s tale by the master of storytelling is stretched beyond breaking point by the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Trailing clouds of glorious reviews from its run on a thrust stage in Stratford Upon Avon, this production manages to slot reasonably well behind a West End theatre arch, though both designer and director insist on carrying things out into the auditorium as often as possible. Stalls dwellers in particular will find the aisles constantly clogged with children – and not just those needing the toilet five minutes after curtain up.

The highs of the show are very high indeed. The heart-wrenching “Naughty” early in act one (and inexplicably received with some laughter on the night the monkey attended), tender “swing” – literally – number “When I Grow Up” and the penultimate sequence (when a little girl chooses to defend evil against greater evil) move in a way few musicals can. The Quentin Blake inspired set and costumes are also a joy, adding as much enjoyment to the theatrical tale as they do to the printed one.

There’s also a couple of excellent “set pieces” by the company, one so original as to feel a cliché before and during, yet breathtaking in memory. Add a few laugh out loud moments and clever lyric and this should be an enormous hit…

…Sadly, it missed for the monkey. Between the gems, there’s an (almost) unnecessary subplot, several sequences that hold up the action and a distinct lack of zippy Dahl humour. Worst, the final forty minutes are a mess of speedy plot tying that could have eased out the padding earlier in the show. Two excruciating seeming-nods to previous RSC musical “Carrie” encircle “My House,” a number that every female drama school auditionee will now be singing from here ‘till it’s banned. Alas it misfires in both tone and position in the show – an 11 O’clock number produced sometime before 3, sleepwalked through by director and author alike.

You could praise the children’s cast - Sophia Kiely, Ellie Simons, budding comic Jake Bailey - and speculate which will be the “X Factor” finalist or Jessie J of 2017; and you might also mention the fluid cartoon credibility of Paul Kaye as Mr Wormwood and controlled vapidity of Josie Walker as his wife. A nod too for Alistair Sim-alike Bertie Carvel as evil Trunchball (not quite psychotic enough – perhaps a little tired that night, felt the monkey).

Overall, though, the monkey was left with just two thoughts. First that for adults, this lacks the pizzazz and clever multi-level appeal of “Shrek: The Musical” that would make it a treat for ALL the family, not just sophisticated 6 to young teens; and second, that the RSC missed a trick in marketing the show. The monkey would have gone for a poster with two green eyes and the white sprayed title “Brats”…

 

Your Reviews: Add your own by clicking here.
Important: Some reviews below can contain "spoilers" - please don't read if this bothers you!

(19 reviews)

A masterpiece! I saw a preview performance on Tuesday 1st November 2011 and marvelled at the creativity of this production. In fact, I can't really find fault with it. The direction is lively and engaging, the music and lyrics by Tim Minchin is darkly comic (as you would expect!), the acting of the entire cast (including many very talented children) is spot on but the most impressive feature is that the tone of the piece is totally Roald Dahl - unlike the film. The male actor playing Miss Trunchbull delivers one of the best comic performances I've ever seen; just wait for the "Phys Ed" lesson - hysterical!!! This show deserves to run and run and run. I hope it does because I already want to see it again.

We sat in row J of the Dress Circle. The view was great, probably helped by the fact that the two seats in front of us were empty. Legroom - not so good for a 6ft2 theatregoer.

Any chance that Theatremonkey could use its power and status in the theatre world to campaign for a ban on sweets (sweet bags and wrappers to be precise!) in theatres?!?! I'd be the first to sign the petition!

Rich.
Guildford.
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This was an amazing performance, and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

The letter blocks around the stage looked very good and I think that it was good as there were words hidden in them.

The characters were very well cast, especially Mrs Trunchball and Mr Wormwood. The set design was great and the costumes were as well. One of my favourite parts was when the children were on the swings; it was so effective and looked amazing. I also loved all of the songs, especially the way that they were repeated throughout the performance. The special effects were great as well, as they really added to the performance. I really liked the way that Matilda’s story came true as she was telling it.

So overall it was a great show and I would recommend it to anyone.

3rd November 2011.
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I had a rather curious experience last night (22nd March 2012). I took my cousin from Vancouver to see ‘Matilda’ and at quite short notices I bought stalls L 31 and 32, which are seats at the end of the row. We both found it very hard to catch the lyrics of most of the songs, and I also had trouble with a lot of the dialogue as well. We both felt that there were far too many words squeezed into the ensemble numbers, especially when they were delivered at such speed and so vigorously. As a result, the music, as such, made little impression on us and we felt we were experiencing some kind of crazy pastiche of Gilbert and Sullivan patter songs performed at double speed and double volume! 

My cousin was familiar with the story from the book and the film so at least he knew what was going on, but I was left totally confused!  The production and staging, including Paul Kieve’s illusions, were terrific and the performances were fine, especially the wonderfully talented children (we had Sophie Kiely as a brilliant Matilda), but it’s no good if you can’t hear what they are singing or saying!

I have just this minute sampled parts of the cast recording on the ‘Matilda’ website and I can assure you that what I heard – or rather didn’t hear – in L 31 last night was nothing like that!  I admit that at my advanced age of 74 my hearing is not what it used to be, but usually my complaint at musicals these days is that the amplification is too loud: in this case it was just unintelligible. Is it just me or is there a problem with the sound at the sides of the stalls in the Cambridge Theatre?
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Matilda at Cambridge Theatre 17th April 2012.

We sat in the upper circle row C seats 17, 18, 19 which were in the middle of the centre block - we had a perfect view of the whole show and felt fairly close to the stage even though we were in the upper circle. Couldn't fault these seats.

I noticed there were a few comments on the sound and I also found it a bit difficult to hear the lyrics of some of the songs as the background music was louder than the children singing.

Liz,
Battersea.
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Matilda. Stalls P24-25. 21st April 2012. £62.50 each.

This show was just completely amazing and I am still in awe about how they do some of the special effects in the show, absolutely amazing! Bertie Carvel was amazing as Miss Trunchbull and I loved the show as a whole!

Our seats were amazing as well, Perfect view of the stage, undisturbed! Don't think there is a bad seat anywhere in this theatre - which made it even more amazing. The show was a sell out, and I would definitely be returning VERY soon to see this... and of course sitting in the same seats!
_________________________________________

April 2012. It was a rather special performance with extreme high excitement for the kids as it was Hayley Canham's debut performance as 'Matilda' and also for several of the kids: and boy did they give it some welly. What a thrill it must have been for a young kid on her first starring role to have an instantaneous standing ovation from the whole audience. A

n usherette afterwards said that there is usually a part standing ovation but last night it started much earlier and spread from middle and back to the front.
_________________________________________

Oh my! What can I say about Matilda – other than whatever you have to do, as long as it’s legal(!), get a ticket for this show! IT IS AMAZING! Quite simply, one of the best and most joyous nights I have had in the theatre. Sublimely brilliant.

The story is one of Roald Dahl’s greatest, with a few little alterations here and there – a brilliant child is born to the nastiest, weasliest parents who treat her with contempt so she escapes into books and stories. Met with the nastiest headteacher at school, Matilda wins the day and finds security and happiness!

The songs (Lyrics by Tim Minchin) are fantastic, and reading some of the comments already on here about missing some of the lyrics I can sympathise as I did a little too – simply so many Minchin-esque lyrics to fit in, but they are brilliant songs. The set is stunning – the alphabet blocks that spill out from the stage around the theatre in which you can find different words if you look for them(!), the use of trapdoors and raising desks – it’s just brilliant!

The performances were all spot on – not a fault from anybody whether child or adult. Matilda deservedly remaining on stage on her own for a standing ovation before the rest of the cast appeared – amazing cast.

Seriously, just buy a ticket and go see it.

Seats were in the Upper Circle Row E 13 and 14 (green on monkey’s plan) were great. Clear enough view without feeling too far away. A teensie-weensie bit greedy in pricing at just over £40 but cheaper than Ghost (for example) for similar seat positions. There is quite a bit of action towards the front of the stage, so when folk in Row A began to lean forward, it was a little bit bothersome. Stalls centre aisle seats I imagine would be great for the show as there seems to be a fair amount of coming and going down the centre aisle.

Saving up already to take wife and eldest child next summer!
____________________________________________

Our party were sat in the Upper Circle, seats D15 and 16 which gave a pretty decent view of the entire stage as you're sat quite centrally. The only draw back is that the very front of the stage isn't visible but for this production it didn't cause any problems as none of the action takes place there.

Must admit we didn't have much choice other to buy seats for the Upper Circle as we found seats in areas lower in the theatre just far too expensive, how families can afford to go in these seats at prices from £60 to £70 is beyond me.

The set is really colourful and imaginative, it's as though Quentin Blake's sketch book has exploded all over the stage. The cast are exceptional, the child performers really impressed with how professional they were especially Lucy-Mae Beacock in the title role of Matilda.

I already want to go and see Matilda again after seeing it only a few days ago as I enjoyed it so much. The songs created by Tim Minchin are fun, very wordy and drive the story along. I loved songs such as Miracle, Revolting Children, When I Grow Up and the annoyingly catchy interval song Telly which has been buzzing around my head since I heard it ... TELLY!!

Matilda is an awesome show for both children and adults (big kids) which totally brings Roald Dahl's famous children's novel to life. Hopefully it'll remain in the West End for many years to come especially that come 2013 it'll have Charlie & The Chocolate Factory to compete with at the Palladium.

I have only one gripe and that was chatter throughout the performance not just from kids but adults too ... aren't they supposed to set the example ... grrrr. This didn't help at times as some songs are so wordy that they need your full attention which you can't give when you hear muttering behind you. Unfortunately, a case of the minority spoiling the fun for the majority.
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1st December 2012

The show appears to be "sold out" until the day before Armageddon, but I managed to get hold of 3 tickets for Saturday evening by booking on the day, via SeeTickets.

Although the seats (stalls H23-26) were next to the side aisle the view was excellent. The only complaint I could possibly make is that the seat/person directly in front squeaked.

I had seen the film, but never heard the musical. It didn't appeal to me when it first opened because I feared the audience would be full of ghastly children with pig-tails. I've heard so many people say "oh, you must go!" that I finally got the message. The audience was surprisingly adult, and the cast surprisingly young.

The children (in the cast) were great, especially Hayley Canham as Matilda, who was really outstanding. David Leonard (Miss Trunchbull) was a perfect bully and the scene with Amanda's pig-tails was hysterically funny. There were some good melodies and harmonies, and cleverly crafted words, although it was difficult to understand the quicker numbers so it’s worth listening to the music before going.

The production is spectacular and entertaining for adults and potential astronauts alike. I will definitely recommend.
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On Saturday 5th January 2013 we took our family for a Christmas treat (a party of six adults and five children ages 6-12) to the matinee performance of 'Matilda' at the Cambridge Theatre, We sat in Stall seats A2 - A7 and B1 - B5.

Most of the party could hear and enjoyed the performance, however we, the grandparents with no hearing impairment and sitting in A2 and A3 at the end of the row, were unable to hear the dialogue, particularly Matilda, and when, for example, she was talking to the librarian we could not catch even the gist of the story. The sound seemed distorted and not clear.

Although we thought Matilda did very well, she was very young and spoke quite quickly - perhaps the amplification was too much for her young voice? Our daughter, who was sitting in B3, was able to pick up the gist of the story although she also struggled to hear.

Nevertheless, she thoroughly enjoyed the show and all the children are now playing the CD over and over!.

We feel that the cost of those seats should be reduce to take account of that. The words of the songs were also difficult to pick up as the background was very loud. These comments apply also to the end seat B1.

We paid a good deal of money for the experience and travelled a long way to get there. We have to say that sitting in those seats (A2, A3 and B1) at the top price did not give us a feel good factor or value for money.

Marilyn and Barrie Knight.
________________________________________________

Overall, I enjoyed the show (March 2013) but left feeling a little underwhelmed. Maybe because of all the hype I expected too much? Nevertheless there was plenty to enjoy, enough to make the trip worthwhile.

We sat in the stalls, row C seats 14 to 16. This is so close to the action you are practically on stage, I would suggest 5 or 6 rows further back would be ideal, especially to get the best out of act one's big 'set piece' illusion. The view is great, obviously from being so close - but the rake is so shallow, any children's views could be obliterated by the person in front, even at this distance. My biggest qualm though is the legroom - when seats are so close together and low backed that you can't even comfortably read the programme without invading the personal space of the person in front then it is clearly too restrictive. I was wedged in my seat and unable to move for the entire performance. I had thought that given that seat 14 is an aisle that I would have room to stretch a little. This was not to be the case as the aisle is used continuously throughout the performance. Overall, I would say approach with caution - if you are the right size and the size of the person in front of you is not too restrictive, then the view is good. If not, it's a bit of a lottery.

For the show itself, the staging, set and performances were fantastic. Special mentions should be made to the children who were superb, especially Cristina Fray who I believe is a very new "Matilda" but did a fabulous job. James Moore made a wonderful Bruce, and Ella Bartman as Lavender very nearly stole every scene she was in! I can't comment on how David Leonard compares to Bertie Carvel as Miss Trunchbull, but I thought he gave a faultless performance, just hitting the right balance of comedy and Monster. He really commanded attention whenever he was on stage and the show was all the better for his presence. The set was wonderfully imaginative, with some great touches, particularly the "school song" sequence, and Miss Trunchbulls chokey! I nearly bought the "children are maggots" mug, but thought it might not make the right impression next time OFSTED (for non-UK readers, Government school inspectors) come to visit (I'm a teacher)!

My problem was the sound balance made the lyrics very hard to hear, particularly when the whole cast was singing together. As a teacher I really appreciated the portrayal of parents and children in the opening number, but as soon as there was more than one person singing the lyrics became lost. This happened a number of times, I thought what I heard of Tim Minchin's lyrics was great, a shame that so much was missed. By the interval, I didn't know what to think, having been wowed by certain moments, but bewildered by others.

The second act seemed to calm down a lot, the set pieces were not so chaotic, the characters had more space to breathe and the story telling became clearer - meaning that by the end I had been more or less won over. The classroom scenes were where this show worked the best for me, and this had more of an act 2 focus. Having said that, the arrival of Matilda's powers seemed tacked on - having not read the book I don't know if that is the source material or not, but I would have found her outwitting Trunchbull with her intelligence more satisfying. I think the actor playing Trunchbull is essential to the show's success, without that performance being so strong, the show would lose a great deal.

There was one sequence which for me was truly magical, that being "When I Grow Up", simply staged with the swings and beautifully sung by the cast. A few more moments like this would have made what was (despite my criticisms) a good afternoon at the theatre into a great one.

Nothing else booked for London now although I am sure that will change. I will keep reading the site's advice, thank you as always. Will also stock up on painkillers for my next London theatre visit!
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A coachload of us saw Matilda on Tuesday 10th September 2013. Our group had long been anticipating going to see this production and finally with group rates down in the early 40s we bit the bullet and booked.

Seated in Row D 17-19 in the Dress Circle first impressions were wow when we walked into the auditorium. We saw a newish cast - many had only just started in their roles the week before. Matilda was Lollie Mackenzie and she was excellent - crystal clear diction, natural acting and a sweet demeanour. The stand out song for me was the Alphabet song - quite an extraordinary feat of choreography and timing and what clever lyrics too!

Miss Trunchbull was played by Alex Gaumont, fresh from Top Hat. I am not a fan of males impersonating females but Alex got it just right - an amazing performance from him and despite playing a hideous character the audience had sympathy for him - his gym routine was excellent. The music was very good and other highlights for me were the "When we were young" "Naughty" and "Revolting Children"

The audience were on their feet at the end and the cast thoroughly deserved it. Recommended and I look forward to seeing it again soon.
___________________________________________________

I enjoyed it, though the slightly bigger stage on Broadway makes a big difference.
___________________________________________________

Matilda seems to upgrade single seats. Bought Upper Circle Row G, got upgraded to DC Row D Centre in November 2013.
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Just wanted to share my experience of Matilda at the Cambridge Theatre in January 2014.

Got £5 day seats, got in line at 7.40am and were 6/7th in the queue. At 9.15am there were 16 people waiting.

Allocated seats G31 and G32 in the upper circle - there was a hand rail in the way which did obstruct the stage somewhat and we had to sit forward to see. Wouldn't recommend these seats.

G29 and G30 would have a much better view without the bar.

The upper circle was fairly quiet so we moved at half time and tried out seats H28 and H29, these were fine and I could even lean back in my seat! Also tested G25 and G26, an inch closer to the action, more central but leaning forward required!

Sound quality fine in all areas.
___________________________________________________

I saw this show on Saturday 22nd February 2014 and sat in the dress circle in seats B12 and B13.

The seats were top priced seats and, although they offered an excellent view of the stage, you wouldn’t want many tall people on front of you. If I went again I would definitely go for a stalls seat SPOILER ALERT as the characters do leave the stage and go into the stalls on numerous occasions. SPOILER ENDS.

I thoroughly enjoyed the show, though I note that other reviewers have mentioned that the lyrics are hard to catch and I can see their point. This was especially the case in the ensemble songs. I’m not sure if it is the orchestration or the acoustics in the theatre. Having said that, I would thoroughly recommend the show to all ages, though, of course, especially children.

One thing I would suggest is that visitors give Covent Garden station a very wide berth and use Leicester Square if you are travelling on the tube. Also, make good note of theatre monkey’s directions to the theatre – it isn’t the easiest to find.

Michael,
Newmarket.
__________________________________________________

Friday evening, 16 May 2014.
Upper circle E13 to 18.

I booked this for my 11 year old daughter and some friends, and had very high expectations.

Unfortunately I was left distinctly underwhelmed. The kids are sweet and funny and everything you would expect, but it all feels a bit contrived and way too long. They could easily cut half an hour from Act 2.

Our seats E13 to 18 in the middle of the Upper Circle were reasonably good for the price (£40). I had a good view of everything, but the kids had to lean forward a bit to see the front of the stage and felt a bit far away. It wasn't helped by the fact that about 10 minutes after the start a large group of students arrived in the row behind us and proceeded to take their seats very noisily and then talk throughout most of the show!

Maybe I'm a bit old and jaded for this cutesy stuff. The kids did really enjoy it but I would much rather go and see Billy Elliott, Wicked or Les Mis. They all have the wow factor which was missing here for me.
___________________________________________________

August 2014.

I have been reading your website for almost 10 years. What a wonderful and useful website! I would like to make some contribution.

I have just been to Matilda with a friend. We sat on the last row of the theatre, upper circle , seat M7 and M8. £25 seats, Perfect view.
It felt a bit far from the stage, but the view was excellent. Perhaps I missed some action, 3 or 4 times, when the actors stood or lied down close to the edge of the stage. It was very brief, didn't bother me at all.
___________________________________________________

While this play does have its moments, such as the songs 'When I grow up,' 'Naughty' and the joyous celebration 'Bruce,' it is far too long. You get the sense that the makers believed that for the show to be a hit it had to meet a two and half hour running time prerequisite. However, no doubt the silly humour and random subplot will still entertain children and give them a fun night out. And it's hard to argue that there will ever be a scarier villain in the west end than Miss Trunchbull, played superbly by Craige Els.

I would give the show a good three out of five stars, thanks to great songs and innovative choreography but hampered by an unnecessary running time.

Seat Review: I would recommend sitting in the stalls row S, you pay 55 pounds instead of 65, still feel close enough to the stage and get the added bonus (or negative) of the actors coming and going through the doors right by you. You also don't have anyone sat behind you, which is a positive thing for some people. I would try and get as close to the centre aisle as possible, to get the best view. I booked through the RSC as they had seats S18 and 19 which were on the centre aisle. There is a sound desk to the left of you but this did not impact the sound quality from these seats and the circle overhang is not a problem either. However if you want a truly immersive experience you should pay the extra ten pounds and sit closer to the stage.


Laurence T.



 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Performance Schedule:
The monkey advises checking performance times on your tickets and that performances are happening as scheduled, before travelling.

Tuesday at 7pm
Wednesday at 2.30pm and 7.30pm
Thursday and Friday at 7.30pm
Saturday at 2.30pm and 7.30pm
Sunday at 3pm
NO MONDAY PERFORMANCES.

Extra performances on 19th February 2015 and 16th April 2015 at 2.30pm.

Runs 2 hours 40 minutes approximately, with one interval.


 

 

Ticket Prices:

Offers May be available - Click Here

View this information in diagram form


UNTIL 14th DECEMBER 2014
All performances EXCEPT "Peak Dates":

Stalls rows A to R: £65 EXCEPT
"Premium Seats" rows E and F 7 to 20, G and H 8 to 21, J 9 to 20, K 10 to 21: £85
row S: £55

Dress Circle rows A to J: £65 except:
"Premium Seats" row A 12 to 22, B 12 to 23 and C 12 to 24: £85

Upper Circle
front section rows A to F: £45

Upper Circle rear section
Clear view
rows G to K: £32.50
rows L and M: £25

Restricted view seats
Row J 13 to 16 and 25 to 28; K 13 to 16 and 25 to 28: £20

Box A: £65 per seat.

 

 

All "PEAK DATES" ONLY:
Stalls rows A to R: £67.50 EXCEPT
"Premium Seats" rows E and F 7 to 20, G and H 8 to 21, J 9 to 20, K 10 to 21: £95
row S: £57.50

Dress Circle rows A to J: £67.50 except:
"Premium Seats" row A 12 to 22, B 12 to 23 and C 12 to 24: £95

Upper Circle
front section rows A to F: £47.50

Upper Circle rear section
Clear view
rows G to K: £35
rows L and M: £25

Restricted view seats
Row J 13 to 16 and 25 to 28; K 13 to 16 and 25 to 28: £20

Box A: £67.50 per seat.

 

 

 

 

FROM 16th DECEMBER 2014 ONWARDS, and earlier "peak dates":
Stalls rows A to R: £67.50 EXCEPT
"Premium Seats" rows E and F 7 to 20, G and H 8 to 21, J 9 to 20, K 10 to 21: £95
row S: £57.50

Dress Circle rows A to J: £67.50 except:
"Premium Seats" row A 12 to 22, B 12 to 23 and C 12 to 24: £95

Upper Circle
front section rows A to F: £47.50

Upper Circle rear section
Clear view
rows G to K: £35
rows L and M: £25

Restricted view seats
Row J 13 to 16 and 25 to 28; K 13 to 16 and 25 to 28: £20

Box A: £67.50 per seat.

 

 

"PEAK DATES": These are during public and school holiday periods. The box office will advise of exact applicable dates when enquiring, but will include performances in the weeks beginning 21 July 2014, 28 July 2014, 4 August 2014, 11 August 2014, 18 August 2014, 25 August 2014, 20 October 2014, 27 October 2014 and 15 December 2014.

 

 

All performances:
Buy a full price top non-premium, second or third price ticket for an adult, and get £10 off a ticket for a child aged under 18 at Tuesday to Thursday performance ONLY. Up to 2 discounted tickets per adult are permitted. A maximum of 8 tickets per transaction applies. It is NOT available on "Premium Seats," or for any performances in "peak" weeks - the box office will advise on dates when enquiring (excluded dates are usually all school vacation periods, of course). Bookings can only be made via the box office, not by ticket agencies.
 

"Day Seats" for those aged 16 to 25 ONLY: 16 tickets - often in rows J and K in the upper circle - go on sale at 10am on the day of performance to personal callers at the box office priced £5 each. First come-first served, these are limited to 1 per person, and may be paid for in cash or by credit card, they are subject always to availability. PROOF OF AGE IS REQUIRED, and the booking must be done by the person who will be using the ticket. The monkey always advises taking both to be safe, in case one is preferred over the other, and also calling the theatre in advance to check that the "day seat" ticket policy is in operation.


 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Buying Tickets Online:

Other Box Office Information

Tickets offered differ between outlets. Outlets also may offer different seats via their phone and online systems. Offers may be available click here.
Theatre Box Office:
www.seetickets.com provide the service for this theatre.

Booking fees per ticket for online bookings:
No booking fee. A £1 per ticket "restoration fee" is shown as the 'booking fee' on all prices - it isn't, it is just a restoration fee. Fair deal, feels the monkey.

 

The Royal Shakespeare Company: www.rsc.org.uk also have a very small allocation of tickets, with a 75p per booking, not per ticket, optional postage fee. No fee if you wish to collect your tickets from the box office on the day of the performance.

 

Other Online Choices (with S.T.A.R. genuine ticket agencies):

When the theatre does not have tickets available, it is also worth trying the Theatremonkey Ticketshop agency, telephone 020 7420 9778 (0044 207 420 9778 if calling from outside the United Kingdom), which offers:
£16.30 on £65 seats (£21.30 on £95, £11.30 on £45 seats until 14th December 2014
THEN
£12.20 on £67.50 seats (£17.10 on £95, £8.60 on £47.50 seats) from 16th December 2014 onwards, and some earlier "peak dates."
Moderate by agency standards, high by box office ones, but worth trying as they often have some choice available! Note that this system will confirm exact seat numbers prior to purchase and that prices may vary for some "Peak Date" performances. A £1.95 per booking, not per ticket, handling fee may apply on some transactions by telephone. NO handling fee applies for online purchases.

Ticketmaster offer:
£9.45 on £65 seats (£12.35 on £95, £8 on £55, £6.50 on £45, £4.70 on £32.50, £3.60 on £25 seats) until 14th December 2014
THEN
£9.80 on £67.50 seats (£13.75 on £95, £8.35 on £57.50, £6.90 on £47.50, £5.10 on £35, £3.60 on £25 seats) from 16th December 2014 onwards and some earlier "peak dates".
All prices also add a £3 per transaction (not per ticket) booking fee. This system allows you to choose your own seats from the selection the company has available.

Encore Tickets (telephone 0207 400 1253 / 0044 207 400 1253 if calling from outside the United Kingdom) offer:
£17 on £65 seats (£25 on £95, £12 on £45, £8.50 on £32.50, £7 on £25 seats until 14th December 2014
THEN
£18.50 on £67.50 seats (£26 on £95, £13.50 on £47.50, £13 on £35, £7 on £25 seats) from 16th December 2014 onwards and some earlier "peak dates".
A postage charge of £2.25 per booking, not per ticket may be applied to bookings made from UK addresses more than 5 days before the performance.
The "Flexiticket" Exchange Service, allowing FREE transfer / cancellation (credit note up to 12 months) of your booking up to 3 days before the performance is also available for £2.50 per ticket
. Discounts and "Meal and Show" packages may also be available. Quality and Value hotel / theatre ticket packages are also available.

Lastminute.com offer:
£8.50 on £65 seats (£12.35 on £95, £6 on £45, £4.50 on £32.50, £3.80 on £25 seats except / £10 on £67.50 seats (£7 on £47.50, £5.45 on £35, £3.80 on £25 seats) "peak weeks" until 14th December 2014
THEN
£10 on £67.50 seats (£7 on £47.50, £5.50 on £35, £3.80 on £25 seats) from 16th December 2014 onwards and some earlier "peak dates". NOTE: Seat numbers are NOT available in advance from this company. All seats booked in the same price group will, of course, be together or at the very least be in front or behind each other in the theatre. In the very unlikely event of this not being possible this company will call you and give you the option of cancelling your booking. However if booking in two or more price bands, you will not be sat together. Please DO NOT purchase if this is unacceptable to you, as all tickets are sold subject to this condition. Discounts and "Meal and Show" packages may also be available. Quality and Value hotel / theatre ticket packages are also available.

Londontheatredirect.com offer:
£13 on £65 seats ( (£17 on £85, £11 on £55, £9 on £45, £6.50 on £32.50, £5 on £25, £4 on £20) seats until 14th December 2014
THEN
£13.50 on £67.50 seats (£19 on £95, £9.50 on £47.50, £10 on £35, £5 on £25, £4 on £20 seats) from 16th December 2014 onwards and some earlier "peak dates".
Collecting tickets from the box office before your performance is free, OR, if required and time allows, there is a postage charge option of of £2.95 (£4.95 to non-UK addresses) per booking, not per ticket applies to all bookings. Optional Ticket Insurance is also available. Discounts and Meal and Show Packages may also be available.

ALSO SEE Tickettree.com for great value "hotel and theatre ticket" packages.

Other Independent S.T.A.R. ticket agencies may also offer an alternative choice of seats

 

Box Office Information:
Tickets offered differ between outlets. Outlets also may offer different seats via their phone and online systems. Offers may be available click here.
Telephone: 0870 830 0200
(FREE call if using BT.com Calling Plan at your chosen times)
Operated by See Tickets on behalf of the venue.

Booking fees per ticket for telephone bookings:
No booking fee. A £1 per ticket "restoration fee" is shown as the 'booking fee' on all prices - it isn't, it is just a restoration fee. Fair deal, feels the monkey.

 

The Royal Shakespeare Company: 0844 800 1110 (Monday to Saturday 9am to 8pm) also have a very small allocation of tickets, with a 75p per booking, not per ticket, optional postage fee. No fee if you wish to collect your tickets from the box office on the day of the performance.

 

For personal callers or by post: Earlham Street, London. WC2 9HU
No booking fee for personal callers.

Special Access Needs Customers:
Wheelchair users and other registered disabled theatregoers can book their seats on 0844 412 4648 and enquire about concessionary prices that may be available to them.

This theatre is part of the RU Group, whose ticketing division is contracted to "See" - . The same box office booking fee is charged for online transactions as by telephone. Note that the tickets offered may differ between phone and online sources.

 

www.cambridgetheatre.co.uk is the official venue website.

 

 
 
Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Theatre Seat Opinions:
Please remember that cheaper seats often do not offer the same view / location quality as top price ones, and that ticket prices are designed to reflect this difference.

NOTE: Shorter children and adults should try circle rather than stalls seats, as the circles are tiered and may make it easier for children to see over those in front of them. Booster seats are also available.

http://uk.matildathemusical.com/ The official show website, has a handy "view from your seat" facility under the "Ticket Info" tab at the top of the main page.

 

Seating Plan Diagram

Stalls Dress Circle Upper Circle Notes
STALLS 
Layout:
Two blocks, split by a central aisle.

The Dress Circle (called the Royal Circle here) overhangs the stalls at row O. This does not affect the view from the rear stalls.

The stalls have a very shallow rake (sloped floor to help see over rows in front) until the tiered steps kick in at row P.

Legroom:
Good for all but the tallest. Seats on row A and the centre aisle offer the most exceptional combination of comfort and view.

Choosing Seats in General:
Best seats are rows D to J 9 to 20. The shallow rake means that from row K back to O the view is progressively worse for the less tall!

In general, the curved shape of the stalls make the first and last four seats in every row poor value as the view of the stage does not justify the price. The box office feel that the ends of rows are OK, as nothing is missed. They also feel that all the seats are fairly priced.

Stalls seats N1 and N34 are removable for wheelchairs. Theatremonkey rates the view below par for a top price seat, just acceptable if heavily discounted. Having a decent centre aisle seat removable would have been nice, though.

Rows P to S are progressively stepped, raising them a little more than a floor slope alone. With short folk in front, the view is pretty good, though seats on the very end of the row may feel a little far over - no action is missed, from here, however.

General Hazard Notes:
A sound desk is usually installed in the rear stalls. Avoiding row Q 10 to 17 and rows R and S seat 10 should put you furthest from any problem. Better yet, pick seats on the other side of the aisle. Seats near the sound / lighting control desk may suffer noise and disturbance to your enjoyment. R10 will be conscious of the desk when looking to the right, S10 will find it even more noticeable - though not totally sightline blocking in either case.

Changes for the current production:
Rows A and B will find the stage fairly comfortably sloping towards them. The only issues are that at either end of the row the seats face a disconcertingly jagged edge to the stage, with staircases beside them; while in the centre of the row those seated in A 10 and 13 have a staircase directly beside them, which must be scrambled over to reach your seats.

A reader noted poor sound at the outer edges of rows A and B. Another in the centre of row C.

Central rows E to K are at "premium" prices. Your call, feels the monkey, who would sit one row forward first, then one row back or even in the 2 seats beside the more expensive ones, and pay less for the same view.

Row S seats 18 to 23 are well priced for worthwhile value, feels the monkey. The other side of the aisle is OK too, away from the sound desk.

Reader Comments:
"A2 to A7 and B1 to B5: "Matilda The Musical" (November 2011). Marilyn and Barrie Knight. In January 2013, most of the party could hear and enjoyed the performance, however we, the grandparents with no hearing impairment and sitting in A2 and A3 at the end of the row, were unable to hear the dialogue, particularly Matilda, and when, for example, she was talking to the librarian we could not catch even the gist of the story. The sound seemed distorted and not clear. We feel that the cost of those seats should be reduce to take account of that. The words of the songs were also difficult to pick up as the background was very loud. These comments apply also to the end seat B1. We paid a good deal of money for the experience and travelled a long way to get there. We have to say that sitting in those seats (A2, A3 and B1) at the top price did not give us a feel good factor or value for money."

"A 5 and 6: (Natalie).
We were in row A seats 5 and 6 and had a great view, only missing the teeniest portion of the bottom of the stage."

"C 14 to 16: This is so close to the action you are practically on stage, I would suggest 5 or 6 rows further back would be ideal, especially to get the best out of act one's big 'set piece' illusion. The view is great, obviously from being so close - but the rake is so shallow, any children's views could be obliterated by the person in front, even at this distance. My biggest qualm though is the legroom - when seats are so close together and low backed that you can't even comfortably read the programme without invading the personal space of the person in front then it is clearly too restrictive. I was wedged in my seat and unable to move for the entire performance. I had thought that given that seat 14 is an aisle that I would have room to stretch a little. This was not to be the case as the aisle is used continuously throughout the performance. Overall, I would say approach with caution - if you are the right size and the size of the person in front of you is not too restrictive, then the view is good. If not, it's a bit of a lottery. My other problem was the sound balance made the lyrics very hard to hear, particularly when the whole cast was singing together. As a teacher I really appreciated the portrayal of parents and children in the opening number, but as soon as there was more than one person singing the lyrics became lost. This happened a number of times, I thought what I heard of Tim Minchin's lyrics was great, a shame that so much was missed. Will stock up on painkillers for my next London theatre visit!"

"E8: (Nicky). was a fantastic seat - you could really see every expression on the actors' faces. It took a while to get used to at first, as there is so much going on on stage that at times I struggled to know where to focus my attention, but would definitely sit there again if the tickets were available at the same price. I wouldn't mind trying out something in the Dress Circle too though, to get a more panoramic look at the stage."

"G6: (Rattly Noise). I'm 6ft and found the leg room to be good, better than the train I'd travelled down on in fact. The view was great, even at full price (but obviously incredible, given what I'd actually paid for it)."

"G17, 18 and 19: (David). gave an excellent view and better legroom than most theatres."

"H16 and H17: (Ali P). top price tickets but good value, as we had an excellent view of entire stage. The seats provided good leg room (we are both tall) and have the added advantage of being aisle seats and pretty much centre stage."

"H23: (Alun of Basildon). Good seat, view good, but if some tall Monkey was in front of me maybe the view would not had been so good, luckily for me it was a short female."

"H23 to 26: Next to the side aisle, the view was excellent. The only complaint I could possibly make is that the seat/person directly in front squeaked."

"K12 and 13: (Cristopher H). The Cambridge theatre is quite simple absolutely nothing special, the rake is the shallowest of all west end theatres. K 12 and 13 were great, if only the rake wasn't so shallow. The legroom was not great, and I would definitely pay full price tickets only if the seats were located in the stalls."

"L9 and 10: I was given these seats as an apparent upgrade after only paying £27.50 for seats in the dress circle; because of this I can’t be too critical of these seats. However, these seats are advised as top price tickets, and if I had paid top price for these tickets I would have been disappointed. They feel too far away from the stage. Some people may prefer this however I prefer to feel a little closer. The rake in the stalls is practically none existent; this can be a problem if someone taller has the seats in front."

"L31 and 32: "Matilda: The Musical" (November 2011). The sound wasn't as clear as it could be."

"O 7 and 8: (Danielle Knights). I was slightly worried about where we were sitting as it was row O seats 7 and 8, but they were both very good seats, enabling us to have a clear view of everything going on on stage. I was pleased with the size of the theatre - I was convinced it would be too big to see from everywhere, but I could confidently say that you could see from anywhere, certainly in the stalls."

"O 24 to 29: (Paul West). We got seats on row O of the stalls from TKTS (seats 24 to 29.) The view was great, the theatre is small enough to see everything really clearly, although the shallow rake meant that a couple of my group had a few problems with big people in front of them. however, I feel they were maybe unlucky, as with a quick swap, they could see perfectly. However, I found the legroom (or lack of it) pretty painful. Once my legs were wedged in, they weren't going anywhere! All the others (who are substantially shorter than me) were very comfortable."

"P24 and 25: "Matilda" (November 2011), 21st April 2012. £62.50 each. Our seats were amazing. Perfect view of the stage, undisturbed! Don't think there is a bad seat anywhere in this theatre - which made it even more amazing. The show was a sell out, and I would definitely be returning VERY soon to see this... and of course sitting in the same seats!"

"The seats in the rear stalls were great and provided a good view of the stage."

"S 18 and 19: "Matilda" (November 2011) (Laurence T.): I would recommend sitting in the stalls row S, you pay 55 pounds instead of 65, still feel close enough to the stage and get the added bonus (or negative) of the actors coming and going through the doors right by you. You also don't have anyone sat behind you, which is a positive thing for some people. I would try and get as close to the centre aisle as possible, to get the best view. I booked through the RSC as they had seats S18 and 19 which were on the centre aisle. There is a sound desk to the left of you but this did not impact the sound quality from these seats and the circle overhang is not a problem either. However if you want a truly immersive experience you should pay the extra ten pounds and sit closer to the stage."

 

 

Stalls Boxes
Layout:
One box, Box A, set into the back wall behind the last row of seats and the cross aisle.

Legroom:
Good, as normal movable chairs are used.

Choosing Seats in General:
The monkey notes that other seats at the same price give a closer view of the stage, this one is pretty far back.

General Hazard Notes:
These are a long way back, depending on the production.

A reader noted poor sound in 2012.
 

Changes for the current production:
None.

Reader Comments:
"Box A: "Matilda." This box is actually at the rear of the stalls, in other words behind the last row of seats, row S. I thought it was very far back, quite difficult to hear and not really worth it. I wouldn't accept tickets in this box again - generally boxes are in a prime position (though off-centre) but seats in this box are really the worst seats in the stalls (though obviously one gets the benefit of being in a 'private' box)."
 

 

 

DRESS CIRCLE 
Called the ROYAL CIRCLE in this theatre.

Layout:
The Upper Circle (called Grand Circle in this theatre) overhangs the Dress Circle at row C.

This circle is tucked away at the back of the theatre, a long distance from the stage and almost behind the Stalls.

The rake of the seats is shallow, contributing to that distant feeling.

Legroom:
Just adequate for a five foot seven Theatremonkey in row A, try the stalls. Elsewhere it is pretty fair for those up to around 5ft 11 or so.

Aisle seats in this circle do offer slightly better legroom with space for a leg to shift into.

Choosing Seats in General:
If you get sat here, rows B to G seats 12 to 24 are the prime seats in the centre block, the pick of the bunch. Theatremonkey says if you must sit in this circle, the centre block is the only way to go. The side blocks are not particularly poor, but if paying full price, you might as well be central.

The box office do indeed feel strongly that the Dress Circle is well priced and worthwhile. A reader also notes the sound balance in row B was excellent in November 2007.

General Hazard Notes:
Circle overhang affects the view of the top of the stage from row G back.

A metal bar runs across the front of the circle. This does not particularly affect the view from any seat other than those in row A, who may feel more conscious of its presence.

Row J has rails at either end of the row, slightly affecting sightlines if sat here.

Changes for the current production:
Central A, B and C are at "premium prices." Your call, feels the monkey, who would go one row back for the same view... particularly skipping row A if taller than 5ft 8 or so.

Reader Comments:
"B12 and B13: "Matilda" (November 2011), (Michael, Newmarket). The seats were top priced seats and, although they offered an excellent view of the stage, you wouldn’t want many tall people on front of you. If I went again I would definitely go for a stalls seat SPOILER ALERT as the characters do leave the stage and go into the stalls on numerous occasions. SPOILER ENDS. I note that other reviewers have mentioned that the lyrics are hard to catch and I can see their point. This was especially the case in the ensemble songs. I’m not sure if it is the orchestration or the acoustics in the theatre."

"C 10 and 11: We got these on a deal, but would have been good value at full price. Fabulous seats with a great view of the whole stage and all the action."

"C16 and C17: (Andy Ellis). I must disagree with negative comments about the Dress (or Royal) Circle. It was a gentleman called Chris at the box office (who I think works at the Cambridge) who recommended our seats, saying the view were very good, and I was pleased we took his advice. We sat in C16 and C17, and found the raking adequate, the leg room (I'm 6ft 1in) OK, and the view of the whole stage excellent. I accept that the back of the circle and extreme sides would have been less satisfactory, but the centre block was fine - especially for admiring the dance routines and action."

"C18 and 19: (Barry Liimakka). Our seats, in Dress Circle C18/19, were good seats, just as TM describes them."

"C19 and 20: "Matilda" (November 2011), (James - regular contributor). Paid regular top price rather than premium as the show is still in previews. The seats were superb. A perfect place to see the whole stage and the sound was great here too. It didn't feel far away at all, although when I go next, I'll go a row behind rather than pay premium price."

"D17 to 19: "Matilda" (November 2011). First impressions were wow when we walked into the auditorium."

“E22 and 23: “Matilda,” (Chris B). The seats offer a great view but the circle feels quite far back from the stage but you still get a good overview of the performance. There is quite a bit of action that takes place raised up on the stage so being in the circle means you can look directly forward rather than craning your neck in the stalls. The legroom was more than sufficient too, overall excellent seats.”

" G27 and 28: We sat in the Dress Circle - G27 and 28 and although we are not tall we had a great view and the sound perfect."

"G31 and G32: (James - regular contributor). sound is fine from here and the view is good, but feels a little distant at top price."

"H11 and 12: "Matilda" (November 2011). Paid £67.50 in total for the two tickets, with my daughter's ticket free through Kids Week (annual promotion kidsweek.co.uk - editor). Found the view of the stage good, with everything in view. The Upper Circle overhang didn't obscure the view of anything. Legroom was good by West End standards. Sound was good. I wouldn't say there is anything wrong with these seats, and we found them absolutely fine and excellent value in Kids Week and I actually preferred the view to that from the stalls, where we saw Matilda previously. My only negative comment would be that if I was going to pay top price (which these are), I wouldn't want to be sitting so far back."

"Row J: "Matilda" (November 2011), (Rich). The view was great, probably helped by the fact that the two seats in front of us were empty. Legroom - not so good for a 6ft 2 theatregoer."


Dress Circle Boxes
Layout:
Two boxes, one either side of the Dress Circle.

Legroom:
Good, as normal movable chairs are used.

Choosing Seats in General:
The monkey notes that other seats at the same price give a fuller view of the stage, but for those willing to take a side view the above will certainly be of interest.

General Hazard Notes:
These have a restricted view - up to one fifth of the nearest side of the stage is not visible, depending on the production.
 

Changes for the current production:
Not used.

Reader Comments:
"Box C: Me and my family sat in Box C seats 1 to 4 (taking the whole box), Theatremonkey gave the seats a red rating saying that a 5th of the stage wasn't visible and perhaps that the seats didn't show value for money at £39 per seat. However on my experience of Chicago - these seats are fab - the view was great (though at an angle) none of the action was missed and only a small part of the orchestra stage left was unviewable. Even when Roxie and Val are extreme stage left and right on the ladders you are still able to see them perfect. At a great price (£39 slightly cheaper then stalls and equal to Dress Circle) these seats offer great views , a private area and great sound quality (which isn't too loud due to the speaker being side of the box) Great seats...will definitely consider again !!!!!!"



UPPER CIRCLE
Called the GRAND CIRCLE in this theatre.

Layout:
This circle is above the Dress Circle, overhanging it to row C. 

It is split into a front and rear block, divided by a wide gangway.

Both are fairly steeply raked, feeling a little disconnected from the stage once past row C or so.

The front block is split into three by aisles.

Aisles divide rear section seats into four blocks, with only the back row, M, running the whole width of the circle.

Legroom:
Best in M 7, 8, 24, 25, 41 and 42 with nothing in front.

Barely adequate in rows A and G, cramped for anybody taller than around 5ft 10 elsewhere except in aisle seats with a little space. The theatre have, though, placed the seats higher than usual to maximise legroom for all, and this seems to work rather well unless 5ft 11 or over, the monkey felt.

Choosing Seats in General:
Like the Dress Circle, the centre block offers best value for money. Select row C 13 to 23 first, then D to F - though row A is also possible at the same price but with less legroom. 

Next best are side blocks B to F 12 to 7 (12 being an aisle seat with good legroom), and equally B to F 25 to 30 (25 also aisle). The other seats here are too far to the side to offer good value.

The rear block is very high up and a long way from the stage. 

If you have a problem with low bars in view, then skip rows G and H - even J for purists - but K back are about fairly priced, felt the monkey. Go for the centremost seats possible at each price - it's worth taking side blocks last up here.

When sold at a discount, notable value is row G 7 to 10, 15 to 18 and 23 to 26, skip when sold at normal prices, though.

Behind the stairwells are also some cheap seats. The monkey would still skip row J, but those looking for a cheap seat (and prepared to accept the limitations in view) might well find K 13 to 16 and 25 to 28, worth a thought as central seats for a low price. NOT for those who expect a full and good view, though, the monkey points out.

Row M 7, 8, 24, 25, 41 and 42 are worth considering for children, allowing for the fact they are in the back row, since they are at the top of the aisle and offer a view down it, and maybe a bit more legroom. just about fair value for money.

Some sensible pricing prevails in the rest of rows L and M too. Central rows L and M may also suit anyone seeking a more central view who don't mind being a little further back.

General Hazard Notes:
A metal bar runs across the front of the circle, restricting the view in row A. Row G also has a bar in front.

In the rear section, the two middle blocks suffer from stairwells let into them. The walls around and on top of the stairwells affect views in rows G and H 11 to 14 and 19 to 22, also row J 11 to 18 and 23 to 30. The row J seats particularly suffer from both this and poor legroom, and a restricted view (a bar which annoys children and shorter adults, but is not noticed much by other people), in the monkey's opinion, provided you accept the limitation. 

The shallow rake in the rear section further diminishes the view, even allowing for low prices.

The monkey has registered several complaints about poor sound quality in this part of the theatre, though one reader reports this problem has now been fixed.

The height of seats above the floor left a shorter 5ft 2 reader in row D dangling - they suggest borrowing a booster cushion to rest your feet on.

In the rear block there are no aisles at the extreme ends of the row. Claustrophobics may like to avoid these!

Changes for the current production:
Row G is not priced for the restricted view (a bar which annoys children and shorter adults, but is not noticed as much by other people), they are only worth thinking about, in the monkey's opinion, if you accept the limitation. Indeed, the whole central three blocks seemed expensive to the monkey for this production, with nothing below £29.50 in the first four rows except a few restricted view tickets.

The outermost 4 seats either end are somewhat expensive for "Matilda: The Musical" (November 2011), feels the monkey, as there are centre block seats going for the same cash.

Reader Comments:
"Upper Circle: (Alun Moss). You are up very high in these seats and I felt a little bit as if I was out of the way out of the show in the first half.  I would say if you go for the Upper Circle try as hard as you can not to go for any further back than row F."

"Row A: (Chris). "We sat in the central block of the upper circle, row A. I'd seen that this was coloured red according to Theatremonkey but was actually quite pleased. There is a safety bar which runs across the front of your view, but sitting up straight and leaning slightly forward, you pretty much eliminate it's effects. I was surprised how far forward I felt, and how clearly I could see all the cast and their facial expressions, the upper circle didn't seem as high as it has done elsewhere either."

"Row A: (Jackie). As the monkey notes, there is a safety bar which does rather obscure the stage, however, sitting forward gave a good view (although by the end of the show a bad back!)."

"C17, 18 and 19: (Liz). In the middle of the centre block - we had a perfect view of the whole show and felt fairly close to the stage even though we were in the upper circle. Couldn't fault these seats. I noticed there were a few comments on the sound and I also found it a bit difficult to hear the lyrics of some of the songs as the background music was louder than the children singing."

"D15 and 16: "Matilda" (November 2011). Gave a pretty decent view of the entire stage as you're sat quite centrally. The only draw back is that the very front of the stage isn't visible but for this production it didn't cause any problems as none of the action takes place there."

"D20: "Matilda" (November 2011). The view was excellent for an upper circle, even when people in the three rows in front leaned forward a little at times. The sound was also excellent (people I know who have sat in the stalls say it is rather loud down there, but the balance was perfect for me upstairs). HOWEVER, the problem I had was that the seats in that row (perhaps also in other upper circle rows?) seem to have been raised, meaning that my feet did not touch the floor when I sat down. I am around 5'2" and I would guess that anyone under around 5'4" would have the same problem. You may wish to get a booster cushion to put your feet on!"

"E13 and 14: "Matilda" (November 2011). They were great seats and I'd recommend for this show!"

"E13 and 14: "Matilda" (November 2011). (green on monkey’s plan) were great. Clear enough view without feeling too far away. A teensie-weensie bit greedy in pricing at just over £40 but cheaper than Ghost (for example) for similar seat positions. There is quite a bit of action towards the front of the stage, so when folk in Row A began to lean forward, it was a little bit bothersome. Stalls centre aisle seats I imagine would be great for the show as there seems to be a fair amount of coming and going down the centre aisle."

"E13 to 18: "Matilda" (November 2011). In the middle of the Upper Circle were reasonably good for the price (£40). I had a good view of everything, but the kids had to lean forward a bit to see the front of the stage and felt a bit far away. It wasn't helped by the fact that about 10 minutes after the start a large group of students arrived in the row behind us and proceeded to take their seats very noisily and then talk throughout most of the show!"

"E25: (Chris May). I was sat up in the Upper Circle on seat E25 and was perfectly happy with my view and the sound quality and rather chuffed with my legroom. I had a wander up into the " gods" of the Upper Circle and really there is no point paying for these seats." 

"G25 and 26, an inch closer to the action, than G31 and 32, more central but leaning forward required!"

"G29 and G30: would have a much better view than G31 and 32, without the bar."

"G31 and 32: Got these as £5 day seats - there was a hand rail in the way which did obstruct the stage somewhat and we had to sit forward to see. Wouldn't recommend these seats. Sound quality fine in all areas."

"H28 and 29: These were fine and I could even lean back in my seat!"

"J9 and 10. (Pip). We were meant to be in Row K seats 15 and 16 but as it was quiet and hardly anyone was there, they told us to sit where ever. We decided that these two seats were the best on this side of the circle. They are fairly cheap and they best avoid the metal bar that separates the front and back of the circle. You can see everything and the seats are comfortable, though legroom could be better (though is acceptable). The seats we were meant to be in were far worse because of a bar across which is why they are worth less."

"K35 and 36: (Hannah). We were sat in seats K35 and 36, which we got for a discounted £19. I would say for this price they are very good. Whilst being very far from the stage, you can see everything, except for although one tiny safety bar which occasionally comes into view."

"M7 and 8: "Matilda" (November 2011). £25 seats, Perfect view. It felt a bit far from the stage, but the view was excellent. Perhaps I missed some action, 3 or 4 times, when the actors stood or lied down close to the edge of the stage. It was very brief, didn't bother me at all."




Notes
Total 1249 seats.

Air-conditioned.

Infrared headsets for hire, some signed and audio described performances. Guide dog sitter available. Level access with a gentle slope through Earlham Street fire doors to Stalls seats N1 and N34, removable for wheelchairs. The adapted toilet is at the back of stalls and is kept locked until requested. Specific information from www.seetickets.com or 0844 412 4648 or e-mail  access (put the @ symbol here) seetickets.com.  www.artslineonline.com also has comprehensive information on this venue. A "venue access guide" from the team who created book "Theatremonkey: A Guide to London's West End," is available to download in PDF format by clicking here.

Food: Ice Cream and confectionery available.

Three bars. Stalls, Dress Circle and Upper Circle.

7 toilets in all; Stalls 1 gents 3 cubicles, 1 ladies 4 cubicles, 1 unisex disabled; Dress Circle 1 gents 2 cubicles, 1 ladies 3 cubicles; Upper Circle 1 gents 2 cubicles, 1 ladies 3 cubicles.


 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Getting to this Theatre
Find this theatre on a Street Map
Nearest Underground Station Buses Car Park
Nearest Underground Station:
Covent Garden - Piccadilly (dark blue) line.

Leave the underground station and turn to the left. Walk straight on to a road called Long Acre. If instead of a road you see a pedestrianised area, Wrong way, turn around. 

Cross Long Acre to the other side of the road from the underground station. Turn to your left. 

Keep walking: 

Cross Langley Street, don't go down it though. 



The next street is Mercer Street. Turn right into it and walk straight on, crossing Shelton Street on the way. 

At the top of Mercer Street is an open space with a column monument in the centre of it. The Cambridge Theatre is on the right of this. 

Careful - in the absence of kerbstones, cars and pedestrians mix on the cobbles of this junction.
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An alternate (some feel easier and safer) route from Leicester Square Underground Station is illustrated here - and the tube journey to the station can be planned using the banner below:

 

 

Buses:
None stop outside the theatre. Number 1, 14, 19, 22, 24, 38, 55, and 176 stop on Charing Cross Road or Shaftesbury Avenue. As a starting point, stand in front of the Palace Theatre. Turn your back to it. Cross the road ahead of you to put yourself in front of the large Pizza Hut restaurant. Turn to your left and walk past the restaurant to Shaftesbury Avenue. This is the only road to have traffic divided by heavy railings in the centre of the road. Got it, good. Turn right into Shaftesbury Avenue, Cross over West Street, then notice the next road, Earlham Street, right next to it. Walk down Earlham Street, passing the Mountbatten Hotel. At the top of the street is an open space with a column monument in the centre of it. The Cambridge Theatre is behind this. Careful - in the absence of kerbstones, cars and pedestrians mix on the cobbles of this junction.

 

 

Taxi:
A rank for Black taxis is at Charing Cross Station - a long distance from the theatre. Walking up Earlham Street to Charing Cross Road may well improve your chances of hailing one in the street.


 

Car Park:
Newport Place, China Town. On leaving, use Gerard Street to get you onto Shaftesbury Avenue. On Shaftesbury Avenue look to your right. The brown brick building to your right is the Palace Theatre. Don't bother crossing the road, but turn to your right on Shaftesbury Avenue and walk in the direction of it. When you come to the main road intersection in front of Shaftesbury Avenue, cross Charing Cross Road at the traffic lights. Go straight on, entering the other half of Shaftesbury Avenue for a few moments. continue up it, crossing West Street. Just past that is Earlham Street. Turn into it and walk to the end, crossing Tower Street. Ahead of you is an open space (Seven Dials) with a pillar in the centre of it. The Cambridge Theatre is clearly visible behind that.

The "Theatreland Parking Scheme" may be available. Call Q-Park car parks on 0870 442 0104 or see http://www.q-park.co.uk for details. At this car park, parking under the "Theatreland Parking Scheme" allows a 50% discount in cost. Spaces CANNOT be reserved at these prices, so choose whether you would prefer to book and pay more, or use this scheme.

If you choose the "Theatreland Parking Scheme", you must get your car park ticket validated at the theatre's box office counter (the theatre attendant will insert the car parking ticket into a small machine which updates the information held on the magnetic strip on the reverse, thus enabling the discount). When you pay using the machines at the car park, 50% will be deducted from the full tariff. You may park for up to 24 hours using this scheme and it is endorsed by the Society of London Theatre.

For a full list of car parks and theatres that participate in the 50% off theatreland scheme see http://www.q-park.co.uk.


 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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