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Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

AMBASSADORS THEATRE
(formerly the New Ambassadors Theatre)



THE SECRET DIARY OF ADRIAN MOLE AGED 13¾ (musical)
Ends 28th September 2019.

Early 1980s, Adrian keeps a diary of all that happens in his early teenage life.

Pippa Clarey and Jake Brunger's hit musical comes to the West End following sold-out runs at the Leicester Curve and Menier Chocolate Factory theatres.

A special note: at around Adrian's age, one Mr Brunger used to write for this very website. Pride is now overflowing at his success.




Theatremonkey Opinion:

(From the Summer 2017 run at the Menier Chocolate Factory Theatre). Some actors have now left the cast:

(seen at the afternoon performance on 6th August 2017).
www.theatremonkeybook.com.

Back when the internet was young, and Theatremonkey.com even younger, a Nottingham teenager around 14 and a bit years old, emailed the Theatremonkey office to inform us that the Adelphi Theatre had an extra row not shown on our seating plan. From that, a “John Tydeman / Adrian Mole” correspondence evolved, an eager slew of reviews, articles – and occasional short plays too. All of unique, impressive quality. A decade or so later, the wider world now recognises and appreciates Jake Brunger’s talents.

This isn’t the first time Mole has been adapted as a musical. At the height of 1980s “Mole Mania,” Wyndhams Theatre hosted a hugely successful but questionably written version. It didn’t work particularly well, and nor, really, did the TV adaptations. Come 2017, however, Brunger and co-creator Pippa Cleary have found the key, and unlocked its true stage potential.

Brunger and Cleary have realised that, while the book is the cerebral musings of a frustrated nearly 14 year old, a stage version must be situation rather than character-led. That vital difference gives us not just an insight into Townsend’s imaginative characters, but an always involving, frequently hilarious, sometimes bittersweet insight into an entire world beyond his singular observations.

We follow Adrian from one booze-addled New Year’s Day to the next, as he loses and gains mother, step mother, tonsils, a bully, a pensioner and most of all, a treacle-haired girlfriend… all in the space of 12 months. Oh, and spots, of course.

Part cartoon, part drama, part, well, fly-on-the-wall, Luke “In The Heights” Sheppard gives us a (big and) bouncy energy on a crazily inventive Tom Rogers set. Rebecca Howell obliges with some terrific choreography – Adrian and Pandora getting an unforgettable pas-de-deux, Doreen Slater a chance to let rip, and more – and Alex Parker’s orchestra carry us along for the ride.

Witty dialogue and sparky lyrics, a whole bunch of cracking songs – “Perfect Mother” and “Now That I’m With You” being just two highlights – and a Nativity Play that needs to be written in full (as well as requiring to be seen to be believed).

Even better, the cast are around the correct ages of the characters. Three teams share duties, and on this occasion Adrian was calling himself Ben Lewis. Not being played by Ben Lewis, just for some reason Adrian was calling himself Ben. That’s all. I’m certain of the fact. Similarly, Pandora, undercover as “Asha Banks,” had a soft steel core to render any teenage boy helpless in her presence. Certainly one Amir Wilson, as neatly done sidekick Nigel called himself, agreed. Making up the quartet, Connor Davis (Barry Kent) is not only an able singer and comedian, but can add puppeteer to his CV. Simon Lipkin should be afraid, very afraid – and not just for his dinner money.

In the grown-up department, Dean Chisnall is ever-reliable as George Mole. How the idiot storage heater (bet nobody under 40 remembers those!) salesman let the vivacious Kelly Price (Pauline Mole) go, though, is inexplicable… John Hopkins as Mr “Creep” Lucas really got lucky there. He’s one heck of a headmaster too – “Popeye Scruton” to the max. Slipping too far into Beano territory perhaps, but fun.

As teacher Miss Elf, Lara Denning makes plenty of a smaller role too, but really comes into her own later as George’s hilariously uncouth lover Doreen Slater, with a scene-stealing song and dance routine to match. Gay Soper as Grandma Mole is her usual delight, her bracing advice to her grandson a comedic highlight. Barry James (Bert Baxter) is also fabulously cantankerous, with one of the best commentaries on a Royal Wedding, ever.

Sure, there are faults. Adrian’s trade mark “missing the point every time” isn’t always at the fore, perhaps, and there is a certain softening of general attitudes towards children, gender roles and authority that isn’t true to the spirit of the times. The show itself also takes a while to get going, with the early classroom scene a little long once the basics have been established. Having the adults play extra children so soon is both mildly disconcerting and distracting (pigtailed pensioners, Ms Price keeping the dads in the audience interested; moving on) though some good one-liners just about style it out. The second act has most of the pacier fun too, though again that is probably as it should be.

A few anachronisms also slip in. “Multi-tasking” wasn’t a 1980s phrase, nobody had nylon school rucksacks (we used sports-bags, as Adrian’s own diary notes). Cordless home-phones were a little later, as were spiffy stage-management equipment, super-soaker water-pistols and smart wooden lockers. On the other hand, I think Pandora may well have coined “BHS” as a convenient abbreviation long before Mr Green did so.

None of this matters a jot, though, in this riotously colourful, tuneful and always joyous celebration of adolescence. I admit, I’ll also add a personal pride in knowing one of the creators from “way back when,” too; but that aside, this stands as a definitive version of a much-loved book on stage. Long may it continue to be seen and performed by school and other groups, a celebration of British pre-internet adolescent anxiety – for which one Mole speaks for us all.

4 stars.


Your Reviews: Add your own by clicking here.
Important: Some reviews below can contain "spoilers" - please don't read if this bothers you!

(3 reviews) 

I got a lovely day seat for Adrian Mole. The show was really enjoyable. The show was really nice and I loves all the allusions to the 1980s as I am about the same age as character Adrian.
________________________________________

Saturday 22nd June 2019. Matinee. Stopped at box office around 10am asking for day seat. Being a single may have helped. I got D9 for 25 pounds. Hard to see how there is a better view in that theatre. Close, but not too close. Missed nothing.
________________________________________

Went with teenage daughter to see matinee Thursday 27th June 2019.

Got seats E13 and 14 in the dress circle for just £15 each through Today Tix. Bargain! Excellent and uninterrupted view of the stage. Leg room shocking. I believe these seats go for as much as £80. If I'd paid that I would have been asking for a refund. There's a huge gap between Row E and F so Row F is the best option for comfort. The theatre is very small so I imagine all seats in the circle give an excellent view. Row E should be called the James Bond row...it gives you a view, and then you want to kill someone!!!

As for the show....I thought it was terrific. Hilarious, moving, nostalgic, fast paced and brilliantly sung/acted by a small cast. Teenage daughter thought it was boring, repetitive and eighties era a complete mystery. Margaret Thatcher....who that? So, perhaps a show for children of the sixties....? Also, I loved the way Bert Baxter's VERY non pc opinions were allowed in. When he described what he thought women were for there was an audible gasp from the audience.

 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Performance Schedule:
The monkey advises checking performance times on your tickets and that performances are happening as scheduled, before travelling.

Monday to Saturday at 7.30pm
Thursday and Saturday at 2.30pm and 7.30pm

Runs 2 hours 20 minutes approximately.


Ticket Prices:

Offers May be available - Click Here

View this information in diagram form


Monday to Thursday
Stalls

Rows A to L: £52.50 except
"Premium Seats" rows E to H 5 to 13: £82.50
"Package Seats" row C 5 to 8; D 4 to 9; H 16, 17; J 15, 16; K 7, 8: £64.50
"Package seats" row L 5 to 14: £54.50
Rows M to O: £42.50 except
Row M 4 to 12: £52.50
Row P: £32.50
Rows Q and R: £19.50

Dress Circle

"Premium Seats" rows A to E: £82.50 except
Row C 3 to 6, 17 to 20; D 3 to 6, 17 to 19; E 4, 5, 6, 17, 18: £52.50
Row A 1, 2, 21, 22: £42.50
Rows F and G: £52.50
Rows H and J: £42.50
Row K: £32.50
Row L: £19.50


Friday and Saturday
Stalls

Rows A to L: £57.50 except
"Premium Seats" rows E to H 5 to 13: £82.50
"Package Seats" row C 5 to 8; D 4 to 9; H 16, 17; J 15, 16; K 7, 8: £69.50
"Package seats" row L 5 to 14: £59.50
Rows M to O: £45 except
Row M 4 to 12: £57.50
Row P: £35
Rows Q and R: £19.50

Dress Circle

"Premium Seats" rows A to E: £82.50 except
Row C 3 to 6, 17 to 20; D 3 to 6, 17 to 19; E 4, 5, 6, 17, 18: £57.50
Row A 1, 2, 21, 22: £45
Rows F and G: £57.50
Rows H and J: £45
Row K: £35
Row L: £19.50



"Day Seats": A small number of seats are available to personal callers at the box office before the performance on the day from 10am, at various prices. May be limited to 1 or 2 tickets per person. The monkey always advises taking both cards and cash in case one is preferred over the other. Check with the box office before travelling if this policy is still in operation.

Some details may change. The monkey will update as available.

   

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Buying Tickets Online:

Other Box Office Information

Tickets offered differ between outlets. Outlets also may offer different seats via their phone and online systems. Offers may be available click here.
Theatre Box Office:
Ambassador Theatre Group, the theatre group's own website provide the service for this theatre.

 

Booking fees per ticket for online bookings:
£3.65 per booking, not per ticket, handling fee.

 

Other Online Choices (with S.T.A.R. genuine ticket agencies):
When the theatre does not have the tickets you desire available, it is well worth trying the Theatremonkey Ticketshop agency, telephone 020 7420 9778 (0044 207 420 9778 if calling from outside the United Kingdom), offers seats with a £9.50 booking fee per ticket on £52.50 (£14.90 on £82.50, £7.70 on £42.50, £5.90 on £32.50, £3.60 on £19.50 Monday to Thursday / £14.90 on £82.50, £10.40 on £57.50, £8.10 on £45, £6.30 on £35, £3.60 on £19.50 Friday and Saturday seats). Worth trying as they often have an alternative choice of seats available! Note that this system will confirm exact seat numbers prior to purchase. A £1.95 per booking, not per ticket, handling fee may apply on some transactions by telephone. NO handling fee applies for online purchases.

Another alternative is www.seetickets.com which offers seats with a £7.87 booking fee per ticket on £52.50 (£12.47 on £82.50, £6.37 on £42.50, £4.87 on £32.50, £2.92 on £19.50 Monday to Thursday / £12.47 on £82.50, £8.62 on £57.50, £6.75 on £45, £5.25 on £35, £2.92 on £19.50 Friday and Saturday seats). A £2.75 per booking (not per ticket) handling fee applies.

Ticketmaster.co.uk offers seats with an £8.75 booking fee per ticket on £52.50 (£13.75 on £82.50, £7.25 on £42.50, £5.50 on £32.50, £3.25 on £19.50 Monday to Thursday / £13.75 on £82.50, £9.50 on £57.50, £7.50 on £45, £6 on £35, £3.25 on £19.50 Friday and Saturday seats). There is also £1 per booking, not per ticket, transaction fee and £1.75 per booking, not per ticket, handling fee for collecting tickets from the box office before your performance. This system allows you to select your own seats.

Encore Tickets (telephone 0207 400 1253 / 0044 207 400 1253 if calling from outside the United Kingdom) offers seats with a £15.50 booking fee per ticket on £52.50 (£23.50 on £82.50, £12.50 on £42.50, £9.50 on £32.50, £5.50 on £19.50 Monday to Thursday / £23.50 on £82.50, £16.50 on £57.50, £13 on £45, £10 on £35, £5.50 on £19.50 Friday and Saturday seats). A postage charge of £1.45 per booking, not per ticket may be applied to bookings made from UK K addresses more than 5 days before the performance. The "Flexiticket" Exchange Service, allowing FREE transfer / cancellation (credit note up to 12 months) of your booking up to 3 days before the performance is also available for £1.99 per ticket. Meal and show packages may also be available. Quality and Value hotel / theatre ticket packages are also available.

Londontheatredirect.com offers seats with a £10.50 booking fee per ticket on £52.50 (£16.50 on £82.50, £8.50 on £42.50, £6.50 on £32.50, £4 on £19.50 Monday to Thursday / £16.50 on £82.50, £11.50 on £57.50, £9 on £45, £7 on £35, £4 on £19.50 Friday and Saturday seats). There is a £1 per booking, not per ticket, transaction fee for collecting tickets from the box office before your performance. Alternatively, if time allows, there is a postage to your home option, costing £2.95 (£4.95 to non-UK addresses) per booking, not per ticket. Optional Ticket Insurance is also available. Discounts and Meal and Show Packages may also be available.



Box Office Information:
Tickets offered differ between outlets. Outlets also may offer different seats via their phone and online systems. Offers may be available click here.
Theatre Box Office:
Telephone: 0843 904 0061
Operated by the Ambassador Theatre group's own phoneroom from 9am until 10pm (Sundays 10am until 8pm). Outside these hours the Ticketmaster agency answer calls on their behalf.

Booking fees per ticket for telephone bookings:
£3.65 per booking, not per ticket, handling fee.

 

For personal callers or by post: West Street, London. WC2H 9ND
No booking fee for personal callers.

Special Access Needs Customers:
Wheelchair users and other registered disabled theatregoers can book their seats and enquire about concessionary prices that may be available to them on a dedicated phone line. See Notes.

www.theambassadorstheatre.co.uk is the old venue website, which still has some interesting information about the venue.

 

 
 
Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Theatre Seat Opinions:
Please remember that cheaper seats often do not offer the same view / location quality as top price ones, and that ticket prices are designed to reflect this difference.

www.theambassadorstheatre.co.uk has a useful interior "virtual tour" of the auditorium, accessed from a button in the lower centre of the front page of the website.

 

Seating Plan Diagram

Stalls Dress Circle Notes
STALLS 
Layout:
A single block of seats facing the stage.

The Dress Circle overhangs the stalls at row G, the top of the stage from central row M and outermost 4 seats in H back is not visible.

Seats start to slope quite sharply upwards from row E, with row J being the most noticeably elevated. Rows Q and R are below the rows in front of them.

Legroom:
Uncomfortable for those over around 5ft 8 (though you can put your feet into the space under the seats in front, which helps) in all seats except the front row (A or B, depending on the production), and is worst in most of rows C and D.

Seat C1 has nothing in front; D1 have nothing in front of 95% of its width; D15 and E17 have nothing in front of 50% of the seat width. J18 and O17 have 5% of the seat width clear - space for one leg.

Choosing Seats in General:
Row A has it for legroom, and the view is fine, but a little neck ache may be encountered looking up at the stage. A good discount make these a worthwhile choice in the monkey's opinion.

Seats in rows D to H offer fair value with the exception of the first and last two seats in each row, in monkey opinion. These end seats have a slightly restricted view of the stage with the rear corner not visible.

F to J are the prime picks here. Remember, that for those wishing to really avoid neck ache, the further towards the middle rows, the better.

Rows K, L and M, when priced the same as rows in front feel simply too far from the stage (even in this tiny theatre) to be worthwhile. Choose the Dress Circle over these. Also ignore N. Sitting just one row behind in row O will get you roughly the same view but more cheaply!

Rows O to R huddle at the back of the theatre. A poor rake  (sloped floor to help see over rows in front) and the low circle make these seats worthwhile only when obtained at a good discount - say half the top price - but even a small saving makes them worth a thought for those who prefer to avoid the neck ache of row A or the rear Dress Circle at the same price as O. At top price it is expensive, though.

Rows P to R are closer to the stage than the rear circle but be aware of the limitations, in rake and view. Take the circle to avoid this.

General Hazard Notes:
Low overhanging circle.

Rows P to R rows slope backwards, rather than rise above the rows in front of them - the authentic trench experience.

Changes for the current production:
Row A are cheap "day seats" and well worth a look, as the discount is good. A reader reports the stage is lower than usual for this production.

Row B is top non-premium price and no complaints about neck ache. Best views, though are from row D back.

Premium seats run central E to H, with package seats in C and D too, so go for central B, or the two seats beside the premium ones in E to H, depending on how close you wish to be to the high stage.

Part of row M and all of row N drops a price over L, so go for N 3 to 15 for similar views for less cash if you must - average view, though.

Row P drops a price over row O - but the view isn't great. Then rows Q and R are cheaper still due to being in a real dip at the back - take all this stuff at the back only once same price dress circle row L is gone.

Seat Q5 is next to a sound desk, which won't worry anybody.

Reader Comments:
"
A1 and 2: (James). When in use, we sat here. Very close to the stage, but you get loads of legroom to make up for it."

"A3: "Pressure" (July 2018). Got A3 for the matinee for 15 pounds in the first row. Admittedly a lot of legroom but on the other hand you had a lot of neck-ache as the stage is very high and you couldn't see all of the weather charts which would have been important for the understanding of the play."

"D9: "The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole" (June 2019). I got day seat D9 for 25 pounds. Hard to see how there is a better view in that theatre. Close, but not too close. Missed nothing."

"D14 and 15: Actually third row back for some reason. Offered a close view of the action but you can’t see the stage floor which isn’t great for a dance show; big bonus for me at over 6’ was D15 having nothing in front of it so was able to stretch out like never before in the West End - and it more than compensated for missing a tiny bit of action at the left/rear of the stage."

"E 1 and 2: (Cristopher H). (Though I don't recommend edge seats) these were brilliant."

"(Ali P). Having got to the ladies in record time meant I was able to use the rest of the interval to hang over the circle balcony, being nosey. The rake on the seats in the stalls is minimal and cannot aid the view; plus as the circle overhangs the stall seats by approx two thirds and given the stage height, I can well imagine neck ache could be a problem for probably the first four rows."

"K14: "13" (August 2017). The nice part about this theatre is that there are only a few steps up to the Circle. For this performance the seat was priced at £12.50, which was excellent value for money. Once in the auditorium there are a number of steps up to K row, but for most people it is not a problem. At this performance I had nobody either side of me, which meant I had extra room and although the leg room is not great for most people it is is adequate. I am 5" 10". The seat offers a good clear view of the stage and as the row in front, which was more expensive was empty, the view was even better. I would certainly recommend these seats, especially at a cheap price."

Stalls Boxes
Box A is at the side of the stalls and offers a restricted view of the stage with the side of the stage nearest the box invisible. Boxes are not sold any longer, as they are used for lighting. Box C in the Circle was better than stalls box A, though.



DRESS CIRCLE 
Layout:
Nothing overhangs the Dress Circle in this theatre.

A single block of seats (plus two pairs of seats at the edges of the circle). The main block is split into front and rear blocks by an aisle running across between rows E and F.

A wall runs behind row F, in front of row G.

Legroom:
Poor in row A, very uncomfortable in rows B to E; simply uncomfortable in G to L (except L5 and 6).

The first and last seat in rows D and E have a tiny bit more space.

Excellent legroom in row F and seat L5. L6 also has 95% of the seat clear in front of them too.

Row G seats are cushions on a solid ledge, rather than tip-up seats. The extra height makes it slightly more tolerable here for those of 5ft 6 or less. G 5 and 18 also have space to stretch a toe into the aisle, but no more.

 

Choosing Seats in General:
Front Block:
"Premium Seats" aside, rows A to E offer fair value for money. Unless tall (in which case take row F above all others), choose row B 6 to 17 first for view, then either A or F. Row A can be chosen first if legroom and the extra cost is not a consideration, otherwise do note that row F offers far more legroom.

Row A seats 1, 2, 21 and 22 are pairs of seats apart at the edges of the circle. The view of the stage is sideways, but if offered at a good discount is worth considering over rear circle seats, provided again that legroom isn't a factor. Normally, skip them - there are better seats for the same price or less.

Row F is positioned on the aisle running across the circle. It offers a good view and the best legroom available. If offered at less then top price it is a bargain, even when at top price the legroom (often the best in the theatre) makes them worth considering.

Rear Block:
The architecture makes sitting here feel far from the stage even in such a tiny place. Rows G to L are behind a low wall at the back of the theatre, almost as if the Upper Circle had given up the fight and decided to settle behind its' expensive sister.

Worth avoiding G at top price, pick stalls or row F in front of it when at the same price. Rows H and J at second price can be weighed against row O in the stalls. The monkey would pick the slight extra legroom over the more distant view, but it really is personal choice. It would also miss row J, as row K behind it is cheaper for almost the same view...

Behind these rows K and L are normally a trifle expensive in monkey opinion, a bit of a way from the stage. The back two rows of the stalls are often the same price... so pick between a fuller view of the stage or being a little closer to it in the stalls, feels the monkey. If sitting here, take L5 and 6 for legroom and a clear view straight down the aisle.

General Hazard Notes:
A wall runs in front of row G.

Changes for the current production:
Skip central rows A to E at "premium" prices. The view is good but there is little legroom.

For comfort, row F at top non-premium price is the way to go.

Two pairs of outer seats on row A are sold at second price. Cramped, so give them a miss, feels the monkey.

Miss row G at top non-premium price (a bit far back and cramped). Row H, though, if shorter, may be a better second-price bet than stalls rows M and N at the same cash, cheaper than G for the same view.

K drops another price, but instead take row L at lowest price - and take even row K then J before stalls Q back, feels the monkey, particularly if shorter, as you will see more from up here and not notice the legroom either. L5 may be useful to a smaller person too, with nothing in front.

Reader Comments:
"Row A: "Stomp" (March 2016). front row of circle. Incredible view!!"

"A7 to A9: ("Little Shop of Horrors" August 2007). The Ambassadors Theatre is one of the most intimate I have experienced in London. Leg room in row A is not great – I am 5’9, and would have found it uncomfortable in a longer performance."

"Row B: Although we had a great view of the stage the leg room was really poor. As I am 6ft + I was rather uncomfortable as my knees were really digging into the seat in front. My friend, who is also tall found it uncomfortable also. I would recommend that anyone tall thinks twice about booking these seats. The play was only 90 minutes long. However, I was so cramped that at the end of it I was tempted to give a standing ovation just to relieve my aching legs."

"B4: "Beginning" (March 2018). An excellent view of the stage as the seats are well raked and it is very near the front of the circle. The faces of the actors could be seen clearly. Leg room is also very good. I bought this ticket for £27.50. Seat would normally have been about £57.50, so it was a real bargain. I would definitely recommend the circle at this theatre."

"Row C 9 to 12: Great seats but will agree the legroom is fairly limited, although the seat next to me was empty so I was able to stretch out a bit more."

"E13 and 14: "The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole" (June 2019). Just £15 each through Today Tix. Bargain! Excellent and uninterrupted view of the stage. Leg room shocking. I believe these seats go for as much as £80. If I'd paid that I would have been asking for a refund. There's a huge gap between Row E and F so Row F is the best option for comfort. The theatre is very small so I imagine all seats in the circle give an excellent view. Row E should be called the James Bond row...it gives you a view, and then you want to kill someone!!!"

"F4: As I am quite big, I asked the box office people to allocate me reasonably - and I got Dress Circle F4. Great seat, lots of legroom, okay width of the seat itself ,and the view is pretty good. I got it for £20, and that was definitely reasonable for that seat.

"F10: "Switzerland" (November 2018). Upgraded from a seat right at the back of the Circle because the matinee I attended wasn’t heavily booked. The seat gave a marvellous, central view of the stage and masses of legroom, since the row is also effectively an aisle. People walked past in front of me quite easily, although tucking your feet in while they do so is recommended, especially as the lighting is quite low. Seat was wide, comfortable and had armrests on each side." 

"F12 and 13. Took monkey's advice when buying tickets and agree entirely with his assessment. These two seats fall almost exactly centre stage and as this row also provides the walk way across the circle, the leg room is fantastic. There is quite a steep rake on the circle seats and this, coupled with the fact that the New Ambassador is a really intimate, sweetie of a theatre, meant our seats felt very close to the stage, with a brilliant view. Another advantage was ease of access to the ladies loos and as long as you are quick out of your seat at the interval, you too can be first in the queue!"

"L5: (Gavin). I would recommend as there are no seats in front of it so view and legroom were fine."

Dress Circle Boxes
Box C hangs on the side wall of the circle above rows A to E. It offered a side view of the stage but was far enough back to see the whole of it.  Boxes are not sold any longer, as they are used for lighting. Box C was better than stalls box A, though.

 



Notes
Total 408 seats (398 with row A removed).

Air-conditioned auditorium.

Hearing loop available. Occasional audio described and signed performances. Guide dogs allowed in theatre in aisle seats or row F of the circle. Take row F of the circle for comfort. Wheelchair users who can leave a chair and manage five steps up (aided by a carer, not venue staff) can transfer to two seats in row F of the circle. The view is not terrible, but the access arrangements are difficult. To make up for it, staff will bring users drinks in plastic cups direct to seats. No adapted toilet on the premises. More information from the ATG theatre helpline on 0800 912 6971 / type talk 18001 0871 297 5477. www.artslineonline.com, or call Artsline 020 7388 2227 email  artsline@dircon.co.uk for further info. One reader reports,
"I use sticks, but could manage stairs to the circle. The manager switched my row E seats to row F to allow extra legroom, and other theatre staff were also extremely helpful - even to the extent of standing guard at the gents loo so that I could use it and not have to walk upstairs to the ladies one - how's that for service!"

A "venue access guide" from the team who created book "Theatremonkey: A Guide to London's West End," is available to download in PDF format by clicking here.

No food except Ice-cream and confectionery.

Two bars; 1 Stalls, 1 Dress Circle.

4 Toilets. Stalls 1 gents 1 ladies, Dress Circle 1 gents 1 ladies.


Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Getting to this Theatre
Find this theatre on a Street Map
Nearest Underground Station Buses Car Park
Nearest Underground Station:
Leicester Square - Northern (black) and Piccadilly (dark blue) lines.

The escalator from the platforms deposits passengers into a circular space with a number of staircases leading to the surface. Beside each staircase is a vast white panel listing the places accessible from that exit. So look for the one showing the Ambassadors Theatre. It is marked "Charing Cross Road East" and "Cranbourn Street". When you leave the ticket gates, do a 180 degree "U" turn. This exit is hidden behind you, between the gates! Go up the first little staircase.

At the top are two options - Left is Exit 3, right is Exit 4. Take Exit 3 - Charing Cross Road East. For an alternate route from Exit 4, click here.

Go up the staircase. At the top, in front of you will be Charing Cross Road. 

On the opposite corner, notice the Hippodrome Nightclub and a street. Do not cross to them! Turn to your right, pause to let those who took a wrong exit catch you....

If at the top of the underground stairs you see a narrow street with only a row of shops and offices in front of you, this is Cranbourn Street. You can either use the alternative walking route or turn to your right and walk to the end of the street to continue this one. If you see the Hippodrome Nightclub on the opposite corner across a busy road, good. Do not cross the road to it! If you reach the end of the street and see a large restaurant, The Sussex on the opposite corner, wrong way. Once safely on Charing Cross Road, turn to your right.

Now everyone is together on Charing Cross Road.

Keep walking until Litchfield Street appears on your right on your side of the road:

Turn down this street:

Cross over to the other side of the Street as you walk down it. The St Martins Theatre and The Mousetrap sign are ahead of you:

Cross the road to the St Martin's Theatre, and walk in front of it, to your left hand side:

The Ambassadors is there, just across a paved alley from the St Martin's.

Buses:
None stop outside the theatre. Number 14, 19, 24, 29, 38 and 176 stop on Charing Cross Road or Shaftesbury Avenue. As a starting point, stand in front of the Palace Theatre. Turn your back to it. Cross the road ahead of you to put yourself in front of the large Pizza Hut restaurant. Turn to your left and take the quiet side street next to the restaurant. This is West Street. Walk along it, the theatre is on your left. If you pass many bookshops on a busy road, wrong way.

 

Taxi:
A rank for Black taxis is at Charing Cross Station - some distance from the theatre, if you cannot hail one in the street. To hail one on the street, walking to the end of Litchfield Street and hailing one on Charing Cross Road is probably the best chance of catching a passing one.


Car Park:
Newport Place, China Town. On leaving, use Gerard Street to get you onto Shaftesbury Avenue. On Shaftesbury Avenue look to your right. The brown brick building to your right is the Palace Theatre. Don't bother crossing the road, but turn to your right on Shaftesbury Avenue and walk in the direction of it. When you come to the main road intersection in front of Shaftesbury Avenue, cross Charing Cross Road at the traffic lights. Go straight on, entering the other half of Shaftesbury Avenue for a few moments. Look to your right for West Street. Walk down it and the theatre is clearly visible on your left. Cross the road to it.

The "Theatreland Parking Scheme" may be available. Call Q-Park car parks on 0870 442 0104 or see http://www.q-park.co.uk for details. At this car park, parking under the "Theatreland Parking Scheme" allows a 50% discount in cost. Spaces CANNOT be reserved at these prices, so choose whether you would prefer to book and pay more, or use this scheme.

If you choose the "Theatreland Parking Scheme", you must get your car park ticket validated at the theatre's box office counter (the theatre attendant will insert the car parking ticket into a small machine which updates the information held on the magnetic strip on the reverse, thus enabling the discount). When you pay using the machines at the car park, 50% will be deducted from the full tariff. You may park for up to 4 hours after 12 noon, using this scheme and it is endorsed by the Society of London Theatre.

For a full list of car parks and theatres that participate in the 50% off theatreland scheme see http://www.q-park.co.uk..

 

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